Night & Day

May 5 - 12, 1999

wednesday
may 5
The HotHouse Theatre Company's 1998-99 season (The Family Institutionalized: The Search and Splintering of the Ties That Bind) becomes extinct with Pterodactyls. This absurdist play deals with the Duncan family, described as a cross between the Cleaver and Addams families, and probably not too much unlike your own little nuclear ensemble. The show begins with previews tonight and tomorrow; the regular performance schedule begins on Friday. (see Performing Arts)

thursday
may 6
It seems as if the Cardinals have decided to take on the whole state of Pennsylvania: First the Pittsburgh Pirates come to town, with a four-game engagement starting tonight; then a three-game home stand against the Philadelphia Phillies starts on Monday. The Phillies may come from the City of Brotherly Love, but in my house, brotherly love was shown with a good ass-kicking. (see Sports)

A classic struggle of good vs. evil takes shape in Dianne Newsome's gospel musical The Devil Made Me Do It, performed at the Fox Theatre through the weekend. Herein lies the story of the archangel Gabriel matching wits, faith, skill and understanding with Satan's imp for the salvation of the Christ Lives Church. (see Performing Arts)

friday
may 7
Tired of being a big Phish in a small pond, lead singer Trey Anastasio takes his solo acoustic set out into uncharted waters. Just as Phish invites comparisons to the Grateful Dead, it looks as if Anastasio is following the model of the late Jerry Garcia by working on his own project. How far will they go in their similarities? Can a Phurther Phish Phest be phar behind? (see Concerts)

It's the debut of one of two new theater companies in St. Louis this weekend. The Only Simple Theatre company presents Chickenfeed, by Washington, Mo., playwright Ben Swoboda. The company's goal is to produce original pieces of theater at little to no cost, so 5 bucks a head ain't that bad. The play runs through the weekend at the St. Marcus Theatre. It's sink-or-swim time -- let's see how this goes. (see Performing Arts)

saturday
may 8
Dimensions Dance Company performs an Afternoon Dance Concert, with pieces choreographed by Sandra Morgan, Angela Culbertson (of the noted Atrek Dance Company) and others, setting jazz, ballet and modern dance to music by Sting and Santana. The performance is held in the always intriguing, ever-changing City Museum. If art is a reflection of life, then this concert will be like adding a hall of mirrors to the Cassillys' castle in the city. (see Performing Arts)

The Cherokee Recreation Center and the St. Louis Department of Parks, Recreation and Forestry host the annual St. Louis Games for the Disabled, a series of competitions for people of all ages with any type of disability. Events include weightlifting, target tennis and slalom racing, and participants may choose to take part in any or all of the activities. (see Sports)

If you like to dance and get a kick out of being part of a community fundraiser, tonight is your night. Depending on your particular terpsichorean strength, you can hit Totally Tango, a benefit party for the Center of Contemporary Arts held at COCA, or Swing into Spring, a benefit swing dance for the National Children's Cancer Society with music by Bob Coleman and the Legacy Big Band, at the Sheldon Concert Hall. (see Special Events)

sunday
may 9
Hollywood Hulk Hogan, Goldberg, Ric Flair, Sting and the Macho Man may have come to town today for the WCW's Slamboree, but perhaps some of these fine athletes will take a few moments to acknowledge their softer, more vulnerable sides at the Joe & Marl All-

Barbie Doll Show & Sale, with more than $6 million in Barbie collectibles on display and for sale, at the airport Renaissance Hotel. Even if those guys don't show up, Jackie Joyner-Kersee's affection for the dolls is well known. Keep an eye out for her. (see Special Events)

monday
may 10
Left Bank Books presents National Public Radio host Ray Suarez (Talk of the Nation), reading and discussing his book The Old Neighborhood: What We Lost in the Great Suburban Migration, 1966-1999, a study of the decline of urban centers. Those of us here in the Midwest, who really invented sprawl, have a lesson to learn from this book: We may have taken that "Go west, young man" business much too literally. Suarez speaks toward this end tonight at Crossroads School. (see Literary Events)

tuesday
may 11
Just as the good weather finally looks as if it's going to hold, the outdoor-entertainment season is starting: Riverport Amphitheater is open, the Muny begins its summer program in a couple of weeks and Twilight Tuesdays, the first outdoor concert series of the summer, celebrating the Spirit of St. Louis, is held on the lawn of the Missouri History Museum in Forest Park. The first act is a celebration of gospel music featuring singer Ruth Latchison-Nichols. (see Concerts)

wednesday
may 12
As part of the Chamber Music St. Louis Series at the Sheldon Concert Hall, members of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra present Critical Reaction, a collection of now-famous works by Schoenberg and Brahms that were originally given the thumbs-down by critics. The concert includes a talk by St. Louis Post-Dispatch editorial writer Philip Kennicott, who will discuss why good writers write articles condemning pieces that could end up becoming the world's next masterpieces. (see Concerts)

 
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