Livin' Large at Laumeier

Enter Mark di Suvero

SAT 10/4

We have the answer to the hotly contested question "does size matter?", and it's a resounding "yes" and "no."

When you look at a picture of a Mark di Suvero sculpture, maybe you're taken with his use of steel and bright colors, or maybe not -- for most casual art fans, it's probably an "I-can-take-it-or-leave-it" ambivalence.

The gigantic art of Mark di Suvero, barely contained by this tiny photograph
Courtesy of the artist and Storm King Art Center
The gigantic art of Mark di Suvero, barely contained by this tiny photograph

When you see one of his pieces up close, though, the natural reaction of awe takes over, because these things are damned big: Carnegie-Deli-pastrami-sandwich-big, sequoia-big, John-Holmes-big.

The four monumental, outdoor di Suvero sculptures just installed at Laumeier Sculpture Park are...monumental. Ranging from 20 to 60 feet in height, the works were installed with a 55-ton crane this past week. From the parking lot, they look interesting, but as you walk closer, they get more interesting -- the nearer you get to them, the more you're dwarfed by them.

Bigger shouldn't mean better when it comes to art, but sometimes it just does. So let's just say that size in art works like size in, um, other things: eye-catching at first, but all by itself, not enough for a real relationship. (Di Suvero's works are on view indefinitely at 12580 Rott Road, www.laumeier.org, 314-821-1209.) -- Byron Kerman

Ice Castles
Katarina's Witt me

SAT 10/4

Most non-metrosexual men won't admit it, but when left home alone, we watch figure skating. Yes, attractive, muscular young women in small skirts and ankle boots are part of the appeal, but the manly appreciation for the physical skill that figure skating demands also plays a role in our secret appreciation for this oft-denigrated sport. When those ice maidens glide backwards around the rink at top speed, it's as exhilarating as watching a skilled defenseman swoop backwards onto his blue line -- except the defenseman won't hook his leg behind his head and twirl. Young Olympic hopefuls demonstrate their skating prowess today at Brentwood Ice Arena (2505 South Brentwood Boulevard, 314-963-8689) from 6-7:45 p.m. Tickets are $7, and the proceeds go to the skaters so they can travel to a national competition. -- Paul Friswold

 
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