SMSS

(Single musician seeks same)

THUR 3/25

Blind dates are never comfortable. Whether they're set up through ads or benevolent (?) intermediaries, simply showing up is, perhaps, revealing more than you'd usually care to show to a complete stranger. Whether you're killing an evening, looking for something fun to do on weekends or searching for that elusive, long-term partnership, there's no such thing as a no-pressure situation. Bring a friend for safety if you like, or just dive in for an experimental group thing, because fortune favors the bold.

The Independent Musicians' Workshop is your chance to mingle, network and add some numbers to that little black book (what did you think we were talking about?). Musicians of all ages, skills and tastes are encouraged to jam, riff and trade ideas for the benefit of their art. Independent is an optimistic word to describe solo musicians. Confident, maybe. Competent, possibly. Satisfied and fulfilled being single? Probably not. Let's face it: Music, like any art, needs stimulation that comes from interaction with other artists. This is an event that can help you progress, whether your goal is to get fresh input, form a collaborative or find the courage to perform. To reserve space for this free event, contact err1@cec.wustl.edu, then bring an instrument to the Commonspace (615 North Grand Boulevard) between 7:30 and 10 p.m. -- Jedidiah Ayres

The next hyphenated genre of music could be birthed 
at the Independent Musicians' Workshop.
Dan Zettwoch
The next hyphenated genre of music could be birthed at the Independent Musicians' Workshop.

Nothing Lost in Translation
Rakugo is universal

SAT 3/27

The image of the Japanese people as stoic samurai is a false one; these are people who enjoy a good joke, and no language barrier is going to hide their great mirth. Rakugo is a traditional form of Japanese comedy, but it's not the standup-before-a-brick-wall-yuk-yuk comedy Westerners endure; instead, predicaments from everyday life are recounted through monologue and adroit facial expressions, and the story is accompanied by a shamisen player (like a three-string guitar, but Japanese). Oh, and the comics remain seated (very urbane!). The Visiting East Asian Professionals Program of Washington University (Forsyth and Skinker boulevards, 314-935-8772 for info) presents an afternoon of traditional rakugo comedy (but in English, so you don't miss out on any of the jokes) at 3 p.m. in Brown Hall, Room 100. -- Paul Friswold

How Big Is It?
It's big BIG

SUN 3/28

Why do all the superheroes always show up in the city? To keep the villains from taking over the world? Ha! That's only what they want you to believe. It's actually because they are checking out all the really cool, cool city homes (do you think that bat guy enjoys living out in the country with just his butler? It's tough explaining that to the ladies!). In fact, some of them are bound to fly, web-swing or drive to the fifth annual Big, BIG Tour and Home Fair. The tour starts at 11 a.m. at the Central Reform Congregation (Waterman and Kingshighway boulevards), where you can pick up a program guide with a map of open houses, plus information about the many benefits of city living/home buying. Then you're off to look at properties all over the city of St. Louis. For more info call 314-368-6373 or check out www.mstl.org/projects/big-BIG-tour.html. -- Amy Helms

Now He's a Single Jet

SAT 3/27

Back in the late '80s, Dexter Romweber was the howling, crooning, guitar-bashing half of Flat Duo Jets; this means if there was ever a "cutting edge" of clapboard-and-moonshine roots rock, Dex was on the sharpest section of that rusty, pitted scythe. Currently solo, Dex brings his proto-rockabilly stylings to Frederick's Music Lounge (4454 Chippewa Street, 314-351-5711) for a 9 p.m. show. Truly, this is a marriage made in the backwoods of heaven. Tickets are $7. -- Paul Friswold

 
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