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Bedrock, Cock Rock

We cave dive for beats and talk with Kip Winger and Sonia Dada

You've partied in a warehouse. You've partied in a field. But have you ever partied in a cave? You'll get your chance Friday, July 16, through Sunday, July 18, when the Caveman Experience 2 comes to the Shawnee Saltpetre Cave Natural Amphitheatre in Murphysboro, Illinois (for directions, visit www.intergruv.net). It's a truly awe-inspiring list of DJs who will play over three days (you can camp on the grounds), way out in the middle of nowhere (in other words, 90 minutes from St. Louis).

What do dozens of DJs and caves have in common? More than you might think.

Christopher Lawrence: LA's trance king spun at the premiere party for Terminator 3, which stars caveman look-alike Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Grooverider: People have as hard of a time remembering the difference between the jungle and drum & bass this Brit spins as they do remembering which are stalactites and which are stalagmites. For the latter, use MC Paul Barman's helpful mnemonic device: "Mites crawl up; tights fall down." As for the difference between jungle and drum & bass? Some people feel that drum & bass is a harder, darker form of the already hard, dark jungle sound -- but it's mostly just a good way to start an argument.

Diego RO-K: Drops electro from Argentina, where old Nazis used to hide out. People also hide out in caves. (Whew!)

DJ Needles, DJ Sno and Chilly C: These three local hip-hoppers spin regularly for the Science in the Duck Room, which is pretty damn cave-like. -- Jordan Harper

What's Winger Got to Do with It?
What's Love? A Tribute to Tina Turner has hit the streets of St. Louis, the one-time home of the leggy hitstress. The track listing includes Alannah Myles, Jeff Healey, Tiffany, Michel'le, weak-kneed Olympian Nancy Kerrigan and Kip Winger. Yes, that's right: Kip Winger! From his home in Memphis, Kip spilled the beans about his love for Tina and his ballz-to-the-wallz lifestyle.

The Riverfront Times:What are you currently working on?

Kip Winger:I'm working in Istanbul with a guy; it's kind of pop with a Middle Eastern flavor. It's like a Tears for Fears thing, only much more updated.

You don't seem the most obvious candidate for a Tina Turner tribute album. Has there ever been anything romantic between the two of you?

Yeah right. Never even met her. But I've always been a fan. I'm a fan of pop music. I did a Queen tribute.

In one of your hits, she was "only seventeen. She's everything I need. Daddy says she's too young, but she's old enough for me." What state were you living in then, and what were the age-of-consent laws there?

These are really profound questions. I have to commend you on the depth of how you're conducting this interview. I was living in New York when I wrote all that stuff, and I guess the age of consent is sixteen. I'm not a jailbait hunter, man; I like chicks my own age. My chick's 35.

So, then, she might have actually been seventeen when you wrote that.

Could have been, but she was a fan of grunge. She was a traitor. I converted her, though.

Do you still talk to [Warrant lead singer] Jani Lane and [former White Lion lead singer] Mike Tramp?

I never did talk to them. I was on tour with Jani two years ago. He's a nice guy, but we never hung out. Mike Tramp was an absolute colossal asshole back in the day, but then I hung out with him three years ago in Denmark, and he was the coolest guy you could ever meet.

How does the phrase "cock rock" strike you?

I was one of them, and I got a big one, so it suits me fine. No, but seriously, it makes no connection to me whatsoever. That was all a fabrication of the media and the record companies. How's that for a disappointing answer? What you really want to hear is how many chicks I've fucked, like one a day, for five years.

You know, inBeavis and Butt-head, how their dorky hanger-on Stuart always wore a Winger T-shirt? How does that make you feel?

What are you going to do? Any press is good press. In the final word, my name is there with AC/DC and Metallica. Obviously it was made in a negative connotation and it didn't help my career at the time, but ultimately it made my name much more widespread. Nowadays I can go to Finland and they know me because they know the name from the T-shirt, and they don't really understand the [sarcasm]; all they know is that I must be as huge as Metallica.

So, what did this interview actually have to do with the Tina Turner album?

Very little.

Okay, well, thanks for calling and, you know, enjoy your life. -- Ben Westhoff

Questions Three
With the release of the CD/DVD valu-pak Test Pattern, Chicago's Sonia Dada again leaves us with more questions than answers. The disc's twelve tracks paint a compelling picture of Chi-town's cosmopolitan cityscape, with ambient and ethnic hues on a textured canvas of roots-rock and soul, but it's not a fixed image. Guitarist/founder Dan Pritzker gave us some insight into why the band likes the picture best when it's changing.

The Riverfront Times:The new album is a bit disorienting, but not at all in a bad way. I've listened to it five times or so and I'm still not really certain of what I'm hearing.

Dan Pritzker:We just came back from playing with this band that's fairly well known, and it was basically the same song one after the other. The keys changed and the tempo changed, but the overall hit you got from them -- they're reasonably competent players, but whatever tune they're doing seems to go through their personal cheese grater and get processed out the other side, all Velveeta'd out.

Whereas with Sonia Dada, it seems as if there's no telling where things will go. Your cheese grater is set to "random," I guess. I definitely hear a roots-and-soul core on the record, but you've filtered it through so many different perspectives.

The reason [our music] is what you say is [that] we tend to look at each individual song and approach it as its own thing, sort of remaking the band -- with the same people -- on a song-by-song basis. We're not necessarily married to any particular approach or instrumentation or anything like that. It's the same people playing the stuff, but the diversity of Sonia Dada's musicians allows that sort of thing. I've been doing this for twelve or thirteen years, and if it wasn't that way, I just couldn't do it.

What's been in heavy rotation in Dan Pritzker's stereo?

A lot of Billie Holiday and stuff like that. Old records. I don't really listen to much pop music. It's not that I don't like it, but I don't really know what's out there. The interesting thing I've found as I've started to travel around the country for the last several months and tune in to local stations is the extent to which everything is the same everywhere. It's a real shame. -- John Goddard

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