Current Shows

Ivy Cooper encapsulates the St. Louis art scene

Airstream! An Architectural History of a Land YachtSure, everyone recognizes an Airstream when they see it: that shiny, bullet-shape "land yacht," the American Dream on wheels. But the Airstream trailer is more than just midcentury kitsch. This modest exhibition traces the history of the Airstream from its 1931 Art Deco design to its state-of-the-art aluminum alloy construction to the life of its colorful founder Wally Byam all the way up to contemporary designers Christopher Deam and Nic Bailey, who have proposed contemporary reworkings of the interior. "Building Dreams Is Our Business," a short company film, plays alongside photos of Airstreams on classic family vacations -- to the lake and the forest, to Moscow, Egypt and beyond. What a trip! Through August 20 at the Sheldon Art Galleries, 3648 Washington Boulevard; 314-533-9900. Gallery hours noon-8 p.m. Tue. and Thu., noon.-5 p.m. Wed. and Fri., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat.

Animated Earth: The Many Permutations of Clay Curators Matt Wilt and Paul Dresang selected works by sixteen artists who incorporate animal (and human) imagery into functional and sculptural clay objects. The show sidesteps New Age-y explorations of earth spirits and animal avatars in favor of smart, strong works with an awareness of history. Kurt Weiser turns in Caucasia, a lidded urn with finely detailed fantasy figures. Beth Cavener Stichter's J'ai Une Ame Solitaire is an enormous prehistoric beast on a rude wooden cart, looking quite lonely indeed. Maryann Webster's Mesoamerican-style doll figures are chilling fetish figures containing "magical" objects. There's no shortage of wonderful, engaging work here; what's lacking is information about the various techniques and media used to produce each piece. [Editor's note: The curators are colleagues of RFT art writer Ivy Cooper at SIU Edwardsville.] Through July 24 at Craft Alliance, 6640 Delmar Boulevard, University City; 314-725-1177. Gallery hours 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun.

Art Struck: The William D. Merwin Collection The first of what is to be a regular showcasing of art from local collections features Merwin's interest in post-1960s artists and works on paper. Jaw-dropping color prints by the likes of David Hockney, Robert Motherwell, Jim Dine and Roy Lichtenstein anchor the show; subtler pieces such as some exquisite Kiki Smiths and Christo collages round it out nicely. Topping it off are a small-scale sculpture by Mark DiSuvero, a gorgeous Jane Sauer birch piece and glass by Dale Chihuly and Dante Marioni (once, he was a local) -- plus dozens more. There's an overriding sense of the joy Merwin must take in collecting -- each of these works is ebullient. Through July 17 at the Saint Louis University Museum of Art, 3663 Lindell Boulevard; 314-977-3399. Museum hours 1-4 p.m. Tue.-Sun.

Kurt Weiser's Permutations, on view through July 24 at Craft Alliance in University City
Kurt Weiser's Permutations, on view through July 24 at Craft Alliance in University City
Kurt Weiser's Permutations, on view through July 24 at Craft Alliance in University City
Kurt Weiser's Permutations, on view through July 24 at Craft Alliance in University City

Brancusi and Serra in Dialogue The Pulitzer is getting a lot of mileage out of Richard Serra, particularly a few large-scale pieces (Joplin and Standpoint in particular) that have graced the main gallery since the Serra solo show opened two years ago. (They're really heavy; I wouldn't move them either.) Now Serra's sculptures and drawings are paired with sculptures and photographs by Constantin Brancusi, whose interests intersect with Serra's in some fascinating ways. Their approaches to materials couldn't be more different -- Brancusi hacked away at wood and polished stone and bronze to a high, classical finish -- but all kinds of intriguing observations emerge out of this "dialogue," including the ways in which both artists treat (or dispense with) the pedestal, their interest in stacking pieces and relating individual parts to the sculptural whole. The small Cube Gallery now features an intense confrontation between Serra's Pacific Judson Murphy (1978), a black paint-stick piece that spans two walls; and Brancusi's Agnes E. Meyer (1929), a stately, totemic polished work of black marble. It's an inspired pairing, equaled by the strong juxtapositions throughout the show. Through July 23 at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, 3716 Washington Boulevard; 314-754-1850. Museum hours noon-5 p.m. Wed., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat.

Hurrell's Men As chief photographer at MGM Studios in the 1930s, and as owner of his own studio after that, George Hurrell (1904-1992) developed a signature style that epitomized glamour, grace and the glory of old Hollywood. Though he photographed dozens of women throughout his career, this exhibition concentrates on his gorgeous, bronze-toned portraits of actors. Hurrell's subjects -- like Clark Gable, Johnny Weissmuller, Tyrone Power and Ramon Navarro -- are posed and in character, yet they appear intimate and genuine at the same time. Anyone who can make David Soul look sexy has got to be a genius! Don't miss the text panel on Pancho Barns, the flamboyant aviatrix who befriended Hurrell in the 1920s and collected all these photos. Through August 13 at the Sheldon Art Galleries, 3648 Washington Boulevard; 314-533-9900. Gallery hours noon-8 p.m. Tue. and Thu., noon.-5 p.m. Wed. and Fri., 10 a.m.- 2 p.m. Sat.

Junko Chodos: The Breath of Consciousness This California-based artist enjoys her first Midwest showing with this exhibition, curated by museum director Terrence Dempsey. It's a beautiful survey of three decades of work engaging heady questions of spirituality and the intersection between living beings and machines. Junko, who grew up in Japan during World War II, has plenty of visual and visceral experiences from which to draw inspiration for her wildly expressive prints, paintings and drawings. The "Concerning Art and Religion" series (2003) plots photographs of engines amid a roiling chaos of inky waves and drips -- it's nigh apocalyptic, and quite effective in the context of the museum's ecclesiastical design. "Compact Universe" features smaller versions of earlier abstract paintings and collages enclosed in CD jewel cases -- the ultimate in portable art. Most intriguing of all are the elegiac paintings in the "Requiem for an Executed Bird" series, and the collection of collages that layer minuscule cutout images into dense, frenzied fields. Through July 31 at the Museum of Contemporary Religious Art, Fusz Hall, Saint Louis University, 3700 West Pine Boulevard; 314-977-7170. Gallery hours 11 a.m.- 4 p.m. Tue.-Sun.

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