St. Louis Art Caps

Malcolm Gay encapsulates the local art scene.

Thaddeus Strode: Absolutes and Nothings In this show at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, Strode, who grew up surfing and skating in southern California, takes the pop-cultural iconography of comics — the obese, hooded executioner, the jug-sipping moonshiner — and juxtaposes it against a multicolored and ambiguous field that could be a seascape, or maybe it's a valley; then again, it could just as easily the graffito-ed wall. It's this sort of deliberate ambiguity that lies at the heart of Strode's dynamic mash-ups. Filled with dripping paint and spray-painted designs, these mixed-media paintings defy a unified interpretation. Instead, they pull together a mish-mash of non sequitur imagery and allow the viewer full imaginative range for the composition. Also at the Kemper: On the Margins, an engaging series of mixed-media work that concentrates on the role of art in a world defined by military conflict. Through April 21 at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, Forsyth & Skinker boulevards (on the campus of Washington University); 314-935-4523 (www.kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu). Hours: 11 a.m.-6 p.m. daily (closed Tue., open till 8 p.m. Fri.). (MG)

Talk to Me: Voices of Kiln-Formed Glass Curator Susan Taylor Glasgow gives us an international roster of glass artists whose deeply personal work evokes the passage of time and its mutation of meaning. Kiln-formed glass is well suited to the task. Says Glasgow: "Unlike blown glass or glass work directly from the furnace, kiln forming is an indirect method of shaping, allowing for delicate details and complex imagery." The result is a collection that challenges our everyday understanding of glass and its rigidity. Here glass is formed to look like sheets of paper curling away from one another, or a group of cubes whose interchangeable sides have been inscribed with images of soldiers, dancing girls or leafless trees. Showing concurrently in the rear gallery is Eden Found, featuring the work of metalsmith John Baltrushunas. Through April 20 at the Craft Alliance Gallery, 6640 Delmar Boulevard, University City; 314-725-1177 (www.craftalliance.org). Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Thu., 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun. (MG)

Urban Fossil: Cast Paper Artifacts by John Tuccillo Tuccillo takes the region's rust belt legacy as his jumping-off point. After taking urethane molds of the manhole covers, metal grates and crumbling concrete around his home in Peoria, Illinois, Tuccillo reconstitutes these urban relics in a thick paper pulp, which he then paints to resemble the original object. In the gallery's rear is Ensemble, a group show featuring ceramics, painting, photography and sculpture by artists Joe Chesla, Rebecca Eilering, Leslie Holt, Ken Konchel, David Lancaster, Metra Mitchell, Jeff Palmer, Stan Trampe, David Wallace, Rebecca Trawick and Lin Xu. Standouts include Mitchell's figurative paintings, which turn the brush on the artist in a series of psychologically revealing self-portraits, and Chesla's prints, which incorporate the process of oxidizing metals. Through May 3 at phd Gallery, 2300 Cherokee Street; 314-664-6644 (www.phdstl.com). Hours: noon-4 p.m. Thu.-Sun. (MG)

Working Hard at Playing With Yourself It might sound like masturbation, but Mad Art Gallery has staged a group show that features the works of Gabe Lanza, Beth Bojarski, Chris Miller and Mark Winter, four whimsical artists whose cartoony work draws heavily from pop culture. Lanza, a painter and sculptor living in Chicago, takes his inspiration from the "flat world" — TV, cereal boxes, etc. — and creates mash-ups that combine pop-cultural reference points with a folk-art sensibility. Bojarski paints on a variety of surfaces — doors, cabinets, tree stumps — relying on the play between her painted images and snippets of text to deliver her meaning. Miller, another painter, concentrates on capturing life's moments, which he then subjects to his moody analysis. Rounding out the quartet is Mark Winter, whose career in auto-body repair has informed his work as a sculptor of welded scrap metals. Through April 24 at Mad Art Gallery, 2727 South 12th Street; 314-771-8230. Hours: by appointment 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat. (MG)

Works by Ronald Christ and Ken Anderson Duane Reed Gallery presents the works of two Midwestern artists whose styles are quite different. Christ, an art professor at Wichita State University, paints imagined scenes that he insists are "possible but not probable." His gorgeous, calming, dreamlike canvases call to mind the work of Giorgio de Chirico and the early Renaissance painters who, having freshly discovered the technique of perspectival painting, imagined pristine cityscapes of impossible symmetry. Anderson concerns himself with earthier issues in his mixed-media series of low-relief abstract wood assemblages. Drawing heavily on the world of textiles, Anderson, an art professor at UMSL, uses a muted, earth-toned palette as he arranges strips of painted wood into abstract patterns that begin to resemble woven rugs. Through May 3 at Duane Reed Gallery, 7513 Forsyth Boulevard, Clayton; 314-862-2333 (www.duanereedgallery.com). Hours 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Fri., noon-4 p.m. Sat. and by appointment. (MG)

« Previous Page
 |
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
All
 
My Voice Nation Help
0 comments
 
Loading...