St. Louis Art Capsules

Jessica Baran encapsulates the St. Louis arts scene

Newly Reviewed
Constellate Reviewed in this issue.

Diary of Consequence This modest show of drawings, prints and manipulated books by St. Louis-based abstract painter Gary Passanise presents a backlog of personal ephemera reflecting certain diaristic urges and sketchbook dreams. In the works on paper, line drawings of skeletal structural frameworks reappear — on studio-abused scrap paper, in formal screen-print series — and alternately suggest something delicately private and publicly monumental. In the collaged and repurposed book-based works, a similar tension exists: An old journal is literally nailed shut, while a small sheaf of torn-out vintage text (from a book entitled Life Among the Lowly) is hand-bound with needle and thread. From nails, chains and shards of glass to the small wavering marks of the hand, it's a show of broad-stroke romantic tropes at odds with their antidotes: earnestness, economy and restraint. Through June 6 at Snowflake/City Stock, 3156 Cherokee Street; www.snowflakecitystock.com. Hours: 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat.

Ongoing
American Interiors: Photographs by David R. Hanlon These oblique photographs of unpopulated interiors capture the peculiar poetics of immemorial interior spaces occupied by the spirit of waiting rooms during off-hours. Hotel lobbies, hotel rooms, conference quarters and assorted landings — while each space is viewed as though through a peripheral glance, the photographs themselves are pieces of meticulous and exquisite craft. The series forms an observational catalogue of mass-fabricated materials — Roll-A-Tex, doily-patterned bed shams, paisley wallpaper trim and matching wall-to-wall carpet — forlorn in its lack of history. Yet each discrete image suggests vague cinematic potential — as though some daily but resonant drama just occurred or is about to, illuminated by office-grade fluorescence or the sober light of day. Through May 23 at the Sheldon Art Galleries, 3648 Washington Boulevard; 314-533-9900 or www.thesheldon.org. Hours: noon-8 p.m. Tue., noon-5 p.m. Wed.-Fri., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat.

Tony Fitzpatrick: The City Etchings 1993-2003 This series of line renderings of imaginary cartoon icons haloed, Virgin of Guadalupe-style, in carnivalesque heaps of urban artifacts has the intimate, serial quality of daily entries in a notebook and the imagistic content of an illuminated manuscript drawn by a dime-store comic-book artist. With its raw emotional breadth, the work, which negotiates the passing of Fitzpatrick's father, defies this Chicago-born artist's tough-guy persona. The specter of Philip Guston looms large here, manifested in a spirit of wryly internalized loss, Piero della Francesca compositions, and the form of tragicomic characters like hooded Klansmen and blank De Chirico-esque faces. Fitzpatrick adds to this surreal cast with representative symbols of a personally fabled Chicagoland — teetering skyscrapers, water towers and tangles of train track — and that region's immigrant, working-class Catholicism and weather-worn survivalism. Hands clasped in prayer and wrapped in barbed wire float above a clip-art goose or a weeping robot against a shallow backdrop of iron bridges and piled brick. Despite the proliferation of imagistic references, the cumulative effect is honorific, nostalgic and ultimately Fitzpatrick's: a small riffraff world trying to hustle away the irrevocable with the eternal promise of art. Through May 23 at Gallery 210, TeleCommunity Center, University of Missouri-St. Louis, 1 University Drive (at Natural Bridge Road); 314-516-5976 or www.umsl.edu/~gallery. Hours: 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat.

Ideal (Dis-) Placements: Old Masters at the Pulitzer This exhibition of canonical canvases of slain martyrs, pious virgins and other grand dilemmas borrowed from two encyclopedic museums and replaced in naturally lit contemporary galleries is a reaffirmation of the human scale. The minimalism of Tadao Ando's building design is diffused by ornate, gilt-framed compositions that date from the fourteenth to the eighteenth century, the two historical extremes meeting precisely at the fragile effects of daylight on the predominantly figural pieces. Contemplative and reverent, the show fulfills its premise so well that it seems capable of providing a discretely intimate experience for each and every viewer. Through October at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, 3716 Washington Boulevard; 314-754-1850 or www.pulitzerarts.org. Hours: noon-5 p.m. Wed., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.

Locusts & Honey: New Work by Jennifer Angus In a kind of alchemical transformation, Wisconsin-based Angus pins locust, grasshopper, and other bewilderingly large and intricate insect specimens in floral, geometrical patterns on the walls of Craft Alliance's Grand Center gallery space to produce delicately beautiful wallpaper patterns. The effect is something aesthetically marvelous of the purely decorative variety — trumping all the more topical curiosities that the bugs, the process of their acquisition and application, and the installation's biblical allusions, evoke. With the other domestic-decorative accents of early-twentieth-century dark-wood occasional tables, jewelry drawers and display vitrines punctuating the space, what remains is a work less about fear, plague and/or bounty than about the peculiar mystery that old Americana holds. Or, more simply, how certain rooms in a home seem to have a spirit and life of their own. Through May 17 at the Craft Alliance Gallery (Grand Center), 501 North Grand Boulevard; 314-534-7528 or www.craftalliance.org. Hours: noon-6 p.m. Wed.-Sat., noon-5 p.m. Sun.

Joel Meyerowitz, Vintage/Modern: Color Work 1976-2008 The fields of Tuscany, Cape Cod's seaside and the Gateway Arch appear, here, as you'd expect — postcard picturesque — in this survey of landscape photographs by Brooklyn native Meyerowitz. An ad exec who never returned to the office after leaving one day to photograph life on New York streets, Meyerowitz has a cool, professional eye for casual instances of writ-large profundity. Light, air, water — the fundamental elements — are his ultimate subjects, captured in the form of young redheads' bright swimsuits, the hazy aftermath of luxuriant outdoor lunches and the blue hue of swimming pools. Maybe it's the photographs' matte printing or a darker edge underlying the photographer's temperament (Meyerowitz also has the distinction of having been the only independent photographer admitted to the World Trade Center site immediately following 9/11 to document the damage), but the pieces manage to swerve just shy of excessive, stock sublimity. Rather, they seem to observe grandeur as if through a kitchen window — albeit one in a fabulously located place. Through May 30 at Greenberg Van Doren Gallery, 3540 Washington Boulevard; 314-361-7600 or www.greenbergvandoren.com. Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. and by appointment.

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