St. Louis Art Capsules

Jessica Baran encapsulates the St. Louis arts scene

Ideal (Dis-) Placements: Old Masters at the Pulitzer This exhibition of canonical canvases of slain martyrs, pious virgins and other grand dilemmas borrowed from two encyclopedic museums and replaced in naturally lit contemporary galleries is a reaffirmation of the human scale. The minimalism of Tadao Ando's building design is diffused by ornate, gilt-framed compositions that date from the fourteenth to the eighteenth century, the two historical extremes meeting precisely at the fragile effects of daylight on the predominantly figural pieces. Contemplative and reverent, the show fulfills its premise so well that it seems capable of providing a discretely intimate experience for each and every viewer. Through October 3 at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, 3716 Washington Boulevard; 314-754-1850 or www.pulitzerarts.org. Hours: noon-5 p.m. Wed., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.

Joel Meyerowitz, Vintage/Modern: Color Work 1976-2008 The fields of Tuscany, Cape Cod's seaside and the Gateway Arch appear, here, as you'd expect — postcard picturesque — in this survey of landscape photographs by Brooklyn native Meyerowitz. An ad exec who never returned to the office after leaving one day to photograph life on New York streets, Meyerowitz has a cool, professional eye for casual instances of writ-large profundity. Light, air, water — the fundamental elements — are his ultimate subjects, captured in the form of young redheads' bright swimsuits, the hazy aftermath of luxuriant outdoor lunches and the blue hue of swimming pools. Maybe it's the photographs' matte printing or a darker edge underlying the photographer's temperament (Meyerowitz also has the distinction of having been the only independent photographer admitted to the World Trade Center site immediately following 9/11 to document the damage), but the pieces manage to swerve just shy of excessive, stock sublimity. Rather, they seem to observe grandeur as if through a kitchen window — albeit one in a fabulously located place. Through May 30 at Greenberg Van Doren Gallery, 3540 Washington Boulevard; 314-361-7600 or www.greenbergvandoren.com. Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. and by appointment.

Arny Nadler This exhibition of sketches and studies for the large-form sculpture series Beacons, which debuted this past fall at Philip Slein Gallery, reveals the material nuance and nearly domestic origins of these otherwise crude and imposing works. In their maquette state, the vessel forms of expertly welded steel resemble closed and unfillable vases, delicately painted a slate shade that appears half metallic and half earthen. The finished works, on the other hand, were larger than life and suggested a desire to endure hard weather, and possibly to serve as staunchly fortified refuges. To see the work in both scales underscores the way it reimagines the classic twentieth-century dichotomy of the industrial behemoth versus the minutiae of the human hand. Through May 24 at the Millstone Gallery at the Center of Creative Arts, 524 Trinity Avenue, University City; 314-725-6555 or www.cocastl.org. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., noon-5 p.m. Sat.-Sun. or by appointment.

Relics of a Glorious Past: Imperial Russian Artifacts from the Collection of Dr. James F. Cooper This assemblage of orthodox icons and the daily stuff of royalty forms a two-part essay on lost cultural splendor and the bygone transcendent art object. Framed in gilt halos, pounded metal and semiprecious stones, the small tempera-on-wood devotional paintings exemplify an anonymous milieu in which studied replication was prized over innovation, and communion with the immaterial was the subject matter of choice. Similarly, the gold-rimmed teaspoons, military regalia and assorted decorative pieces from the show's secular portion involve such an engaged level of tactile detail that they could be considered devotionally crafted. The exhibit as a whole serves as a useful reference point for contemporary art's renewed interest in gold, which seems to signify a nostalgia for creative acts deemed sacred and authentic. Through December 20 at the Saint Louis University Museum of Art, 3663 Lindell Boulevard; 314-977-2666 or sluma.slu.edu. Hours: 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Wed.-Sun.

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