St. Louis Art Capsules

Jessica Baran encapsulates the St Louis arts scene

 Newly Reviewed
Currents 103: Claudia Schmacke Reviewed in this issue.

Saudade Cracked eggshells, cleared of yolk, pile into the crevices of chunks of salvaged Sheetrock, bolted together in half-closed, half-ravaged shelflike units. A tin can, nearly entirely gnawed out by rust, serves as a small pedestal for two shells; two found pieces of scrap wood, crudely nailed together, cradle another broken set. These small assemblages by St. Louis-based artist Jessica Kiel-Wornson make nests of industrial refuse, importing a romantic delicacy to the otherwise abused, abandoned and rough-hewn. It's a familiar ambition of a sweeping love-song variety, but Kiel-Wornson seems aware of this (the exhibition's title is a Portuguese word that describes a kind of longing, which the artist discovered via the singer Nick Cave). The pieces, as a result, act like sketches of a proposal to plumb high sentiment to its unapologetic depth — a proposal worth accepting. Through June 13 at PSTL Gallery at Pace Framing, 3842 Washington Boulevard; 314-531-4304 or www.paceframing.com. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat.

Ongoing
Chantal Akerman: Moving Through Time and Space An explicit treatment of film as art, this survey of two decades' worth of the Belgian documentarian's work distills the medium to two essential parts: narration and gaze. Projected and screened in truncated swatches in a dark warren of loosely partitioned spaces, Akerman's work appears as a menagerie of endless highways, anonymous passersby and the overlapping cadences of the cigarette-ravaged voiceover of the filmmaker herself. Because two of her films explore canonically familiar American subjects — the culture of the Deep South and the Mexican immigrant experience — the issue of otherness, or how someone else's perspective can transform the well known, becomes saliently relevant. How much, actually, is different when seeing the familiar through another's eyes? Complementing Akerman's work is British artist Carey Young's Speech Acts, a series of pieces capitalizing on the creative potential of call centers, telephone operators and that disembodied voice at the end of a long line that calmly leads you through the nebulous airspace of critical questions and their ostensibly revelatory answers. It's an attractive form that suggests perhaps all of us have a need for the ritual of bureaucratic help — as a kind of general panacea, with nothing actually resulting from its use. Through August 2 at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, 3750 Washington Boulevard; 314-535-4660 or www.contemporarystl.org. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Wed.-Sat., 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sun.

Diary of Consequence This modest show of drawings, prints and manipulated books by St. Louis-based abstract painter Gary Passanise presents a backlog of personal ephemera reflecting certain diaristic urges and sketchbook dreams. In the works on paper, line drawings of skeletal structural frameworks reappear — on studio-abused scrap paper, in formal screen-print series — and alternately suggest something delicately private and publicly monumental. In the collaged and repurposed book-based works, a similar tension exists: An old journal is literally nailed shut, while a small sheaf of torn-out vintage text (from a book entitled Life Among the Lowly) is hand-bound with needle and thread. From nails, chains and shards of glass to the small wavering marks of the hand, it's a show of broad-stroke romantic tropes at odds with their antidotes: earnestness, economy and restraint. Also showing: an installation by Jessica Kiel-Wornson, and work in the flat files by Maria Marshall, Clyde Ashby and Peter Pranschke. Through June 6 at Snowflake/City Stock, 3156 Cherokee Street; www.snowflakecitystock.com. Hours: 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat.

Marcel Duchamp: Chess Master This thorough and engaging re-examination of the father of conceptual art's sudden choice to resign from making art to become a full-time chess player sees Duchamp's ostensible career change as yet another brilliant creative maneuver. Duchamp, who was responsible for some of the most formidable innovations in twentieth-century art — most resonant, the idea that choice-making itself is an artistic act — found chess to be not only a universal language but the ultimate distillation of his fundamental interests: winning, losing and fastidious strategy. The exhibition presents ephemera and art related to the artist's late years as a chess champion, chess writer, chess correspondent and chess aesthetician (even the chessboard and pieces held particular interest for Duchamp and his like-minded contemporaries), the sum of which is an elegant argument for the game's expansive and allegorical merits, as well as the boundless intellectual agility of the ever-clever master himself. Through August 16 at the Saint Louis University Museum of Art, 3663 Lindell Boulevard; 314-977-2666 or www.sluma.slu.edu. Hours: 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Wed.-Sun.

Ideal (Dis-) Placements: Old Masters at the Pulitzer This exhibition of canonical canvases of slain martyrs, pious virgins and other grand dilemmas borrowed from two encyclopedic museums and replaced in naturally lit contemporary galleries is a reaffirmation of the human scale. The minimalism of Tadao Ando's building design is diffused by ornate, gilt-framed compositions that date from the fourteenth to the eighteenth century, the two historical extremes meeting precisely at the fragile effects of daylight on the predominantly figural pieces. Contemplative and reverent, the show fulfills its premise so well that it seems capable of providing a discretely intimate experience for each and every viewer. Through October 3 at the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, 3716 Washington Boulevard; 314-754-1850 or www.pulitzerarts.org. Hours: noon-5 p.m. Wed., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.

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