Fittingly, one of them was George Orwell's 1984.

Amazon is selling more books, but it isn't helping the publishers any. "Amazon generally demands an exploitative discount schedule from the publishers," explains Jeff Waxman, a bookseller at 57th Street Books in Chicago and the creator of the blog Against Amazon (http://againstamazon.tumblr.com). "Publishers are selling more books because Amazon is such a juggernaut, but they're making less money. They're selling something for less than it's worth, and the money's evaporating."

So where does that leave independent bookstores, with their comparatively low sales volumes and devotion to ink-and-paper books, which they sell at the full cover price?

Owner Kelly von Plonski shows off her fiction 
section.
Jennifer Silverberg
Owner Kelly von Plonski shows off her fiction section.
Subterranean Books' storefront in the Delmar Loop.
Jennifer Silverberg
Subterranean Books' storefront in the Delmar Loop.

Scott Phillips, for one, believes there will always be a place for independent bookstores, at least for curious and adventurous readers. A good bookseller knows what her readers want to pick up next; Amazon can only use its algorithms to venture a guess. "When I go to Subterranean," he says, "I never know what I'm going to find. Many times, I find something wonderful, something I never knew existed."


On March 1, the St. Louis Independent Bookstore Alliance holds its first official meeting at Pudd'nhead Books, consecrated with that bookstore-gathering staple: wine served in plastic cups. Representatives from thirteen new and used bookstores across the metropolitan area show up. (A fourteenth sends regrets but wants to be involved in future events.) Jarek Steele presides, from an overstuffed armchair he shares with Henry (the poodle, not the toddler). "This is the most exciting thing that's happened to me in at least a year," he declares.

At first the gathering has the feel of a support group. No one seems to know their stores exist, the shopkeepers commiserate; there's no good computer inventory system for used bookstores; young people are only interested in turning old atlases into laptop covers.

The only point of contention is...Amazon. "I'm sorry, I love Amazon," says Deborah Herrington, who, along with her husband Peter, owns the venerable used-book temple Dunaway Books on South Grand Boulevard. "We sell 45 percent of our inventory online on Amazon — eBay got too expensive."

Herrington's fellow used-book sellers make noises of agreement.

"Most of the damage Amazon does is to new bookstores," Steele acknowledges. "I know you can't have a used bookstore anymore without it."

The elephant in the room having been gracefully stepped over, Peter Herrington declares, "Everyone in this room is my friend and associate. If we are competitors, I would have failed."

Herrington has never met any of the other booksellers before tonight. That doesn't stop him from offering to share his stock with the other local used-book dealers. As if wishing not to be outdone, Steele invites the new-book contingent to Left Bank's meetings with publishers' reps.

The conversation meanders: Would a universal coupon for all Alliance members work? Might it be better to sell a "passport" that can be redeemed for discounts once customers get stamped at a given number of stores? At what point do universal discounts lapse into price fixing? ("If the justice department came after us, that's the best thing that could happen," protests Steven Hoffmann, co-owner of the Archive, a used-book newcomer on Cherokee Street. "Think of the publicity!") Should they incorporate as a nonprofit? How will they cover start-up costs? Firecracker Press on Cherokee Street has agreed to print the maps at a discount and design a logo for free, Web designer Jim Dunn will take half his fee in books, and Steele and Furrer have already sold tickets for the bookstore cruise. Still, what's a fair amount to ask everyone to chip in?

Peter Herrington settles the debate by pulling out his checkbook and writing a check for $50, which he hands to Steele with a flourish. "If we keep talking, I won't live long enough to see this thing started!" he exclaims. Steele promises to open a checking account first thing in the morning. On that basis, he is elected the group's president. Furrer makes it official by refilling all the plastic cups with wine.

The Alliance has had a rejuvenating effect on everyone involved, but on Kelly von Plonski most of all. Instead of despairing, she has become cautiously optimistic. In the six weeks since Subterranean announced it was in dire straits, business has picked up. February's sales made up for the devastating losses of January.

"I always thought about working with the other bookstores," von Plonski reflects, "but I never got around to it. It was on my list. Maybe what it takes is a fire under you to get things done. I love what I do. I wish it weren't so hair-pullingly difficult. To not have to worry about bills for one week, to order in everything I want to order in...."

She trails off. "If Subterranean went under, I'd go work for Brad [her partner, who runs a computer business], doing bookkeeping, that sort of thing. I'm lucky in that I have a backup."

She pauses. "There's nothing fulfilling in that at all."

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23 comments
susieque2
susieque2

Sorry, I haven't been into the bookstore for a while. What would help economically is if the bookstores sold textbooks for college classes, especially used ones. A nice selection of how-to books would be good. You just don't want to drag that reader thing under the car with you. Advertising a how to book in a section devoted to the same subject on Craigslist is free.

Bunny N
Bunny N

I just tried to find some used book stores in the STL area but only like 4 out of the 50+ stores have decent websites. I don't exactly know how search engine marketing works, but book stores need to get on top of getting themselves known on the internet. At least make it so that if I type "used book stores st louis" your store comes up and I don't have to do detective work to find out where you are. It's even hard to find book stores on sites like Yelp and Citysearch. So yeah, Amazon might be killing indie stores, but they're not using the internet to help themselves either.

ConradVonSupertramp
ConradVonSupertramp

I found this paper, and then this article off of a suggestion from a friend. I'm an independent publisher, and business consultant, and lover of bookstores truly inspired to see the kind of people I hope to associate with already making a mark on the 21st century gorilla warfare of business. Can't wait to take the tour. Good luck.

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guest
guest

I have some honest constructive criticism for Left Bank books. I live in downtown St. Louis and have been to their store a few times and bought a couple of books. I'm politically conservative and I read a lot (and I buy a lot of books). Now before the scowls come out, don't make the assumption that I'm some kind of hatemogering rube-- that template is just another tired old form of prejudice that needs to go.

There were a lot of good books at LBB, but the political section was HORRIBLY skewed to the left. I was looking for a few big name books written by conservative authors which were selling huge at the time, nationwide- yet were completely absent from the shelves there. I understand you guys may hate people like Sarah Palin, George W. Bush etc--and maybe by not carrying their books, you're making some statement, but I don't think you're aware of how unwelcoming that kind of omission bodes for the local reader who is open minded, yet politically on the right. I may be going out on a limb, but I think you have your noses in the air just a little and give off an impression of looking down on those on the other side of the aisle-- I had cash in hand ready to spend, but since the product wasn't there, I had to take my business to Borders.

I saw some petition on your counter complaining about "whitewashing"-- the underrepresentation of "people of color" on magazine covers. I felt like screaming at the top of my lungs about the lack of diversity of thought in your book selection. It was laughable.

I don't want you guys to fail. I want you to succeed. Part of that success is going to be whether you want the hard earned money of people like me, I'm not some easily reduced caricature of what you think a conservative is. I wasn't always conservative either; you should have seen me ten years ago-- In those halcyon days I would have made you guys look like Ann Coulter! :)

I think if you really want to capture market-share, you have to take a look in the mirror and decide to offer a selection of books that is more welcoming to those outside of your own political milieu. I used to be a 20-something slacker working in a record store, scoffing like those guys in the film HIgh Fidelity whenever somebody would come in looking for something lame. I realize now that those "schmucks" spent a lot more money than the kid who had good taste in tunes but was going to either buy used CDs or download everything for free.

The thing about conservatives, is that like it or not, we are hard working and have money to spend.

When we go into Borders and see that the smart a*s people working there have snarkily hidden Sarah Palin's book in the Fiction section, or have filed George W. Bush's book in the True Crimes, we make a mental note of that nastiness-- it's a chain, what do the hourly people at Borders care whether they sell more books? They're not personally invested. You guys can go in the other direction and present these books along with the stuff more akin your own beliefs and let the readers make their own selections.

I like going into a more intimate, independent bookstore where my ears aren't bludgeoned by James Blunt piping through the speakers (lame), and where the environment is a little more cozy and relaxing-- a place where I could get lost for a few hours. I want to go where I feel like my business is wanted and where I feel like my beliefs are treated with some modicum of respect. Reach out to us a little, we're out here.

Thanks for listening.

ralpheatsbeef
ralpheatsbeef

Indies need to re-define the battle. They cannot compete with Amazon on price and volume ... not with coupons, bookstore cruises, or anything else ... because Amazon can sell the books for less than your cost. Gimmicks cannot overcome the monstrous economic disadvantage.

To survive, you must sell what they cannot. What does Amazon NOT have? People -- knowledgeable, helpful, caring, interesting people. Setting -- A good bookstore is a place people feel they have ownership; a comfort zone with friends and potential friends, and a warmth that cannot be stockpiled in a warehouse and delivered by FedEx on demand. Plot --- Where people and place come together, stories happen and intertwine.

A good bookstore is like a good book, come to life. It is that experience and relationship that sets it apart from the electronic newcomers, with their cold efficiency. You have to get people, especially young people raised in the glow of their many devices, to look up and walk in, and give them a chance to recognize the value you are providing.

You may not be in the business of selling books, as much as the business of selling people, place and plot.

Bill Hannegan
Bill Hannegan

Honestly, if Kelly returns to take charge of her book store, Subterranean will revive. She has to realize that she can't hire anyone to take her place.

Braucau
Braucau

I have felt Subterranean has been mismanaged since I moved to U City four years ago. Look at the second paragraph of this article: the store is consciously stocked with books that neither a popular audience nor Wash U students will want. Who is supposed to buy the stock at a store in the Delmar Loop? I have at least half a dozen grad student friends who have walked in wanting staples like George Eliot, Joyce, or any number of well-known poets and they have come out empty handed. If humanities academics and your average St. Louisian walking in off the street both cannot find the sorts of things they want to read, who will? A couple dozen Looprat hipsters can't keep a bookstore open by buying issues of The Believer every month.

Someone says later in this article that people want bookstores to be community places where "you can drink a cup of coffee and just hang out." Totally agree. Too bad you can't do either at Subterranean. I said all of these things in the customer survey, because I do my civic duty and buy books from them every month or two, but, perplexingly enough, the owner says they only received positive feedback. There's no reason the Loop couldn't support a well-run indie bookstore, but it needs to be managed by someone who knows what he or she is doing. For me, the upshot of this article is that it sounds like the owners are now getting some solid advice from the proprietors of successful stores like Left Bank. Hopefully they'll take some good advice and improve the store.

Tom
Tom

Physical bookstores and public libraries will ALL be gone in 5-10 years. The same thing happened to stories that sold vinyl records. Nothing can be done to stop this evolution. These small bookstores must turn into coffee and bagel shops. That's it.

Laura Hamlett
Laura Hamlett

I may be biased, but Jim Dunn's an amazing web designer and contributor to the community. And he's always available for freelance work. :)

Bill Hannegan
Bill Hannegan

"By her own admission, she's not much of a schmoozer and, since the birth of her son Henry in 2009, she has done most of her work from home."

I think Kelly not being in the shop has hurt more than she knows. When I have bought books at Subterranean, I looked for her and figured she must have sold the place. The lady behind the counter didn't know me and wouldn't take my check. That pissed me off. I haven't been back much after that. I am glad to find out that Kelly still owns the place and I have to say I have huge respect for her previous unselfish efforts to help small, independent businesses in St. Louis through Build St. Louis. She needs all the loyalty St. Louis can possibly give her now. I'll be back buying at Subterranean and will bring along as many friends as possible.

Elyse_kelly
Elyse_kelly

I sincerely hope that the Alliance is a success for all of our independent bookstores. It would be a tragic loss for St. Louis if any of them were to go under. Support our local bookstores!!

Winnie
Winnie

This was an excellent, informative article, and an effective rallying call for those of us who talk the talk of supporting local businesses and loving indie bookstores. I like their efforts to mobilize and band together (and the RFT's idea for a cover that played off of the iconic Band of Brothers image). Er, but that's not to say I haven't bought used books on Amazon (or new books from Borders), either.

Bill Hannegan
Bill Hannegan

Never buy a book again from a chain. What is so hard about that?

Bowen1977
Bowen1977

I think saving this bookstore should be taken seriously! Small businesses are the backbone of the city. Research grants, low interest loans and other such options. If anyone has suggestions or real solutions, please share!

Michael
Michael

It's about time this happened. If they don't band together, there won't be any left.

rw
rw

What a great article! BUY LOCAL BOOKS!

Guest
Guest

Fantastic story! Thank you so much for bringing this to light.

Treasure Hunter
Treasure Hunter

Hey bibliophile friends,<3 the tour idea! While reading this interesting article, I clicked the www.stlindibook.com link hoping to purchase a ticket now while I have the funds, but I didn't find one. Any plans to add a Paypal link soon? The tour sounds like fun. I want a seat on that bus!

Michael Borich
Michael Borich

"A bookstore is one of the only pieces of evidence we have that people are still thinking." — Jerry Seinfeld (SeinLanguage)

Kelly
Kelly

Hmm, not sure whether responding is encouraged or discouraged but here I go. The store is purposely stocked with things that the neighborhood would want--the neighborhood of families, hipsters, students, tourists--which means indie bookstore best-sellers (they tend more toward the literary than the commercial although those terms are hornets' nests themselves), modern fiction, weird humor books based on blogs, children's picture books, etc... all sorts of things that this varied clientele wants. Make no mistake, the clientele of the Loop is extremely diverse. We used to stock a lot more literary classics and academic titles but those don't sell. Each book has to earn its space; we can't afford wallpaper. And the literary classics that do earn their space are almost always in stock (Joyce is one, Eliot not so much--although she used to be until people quit buying her and she got returned). If a book is still sitting on the shelf and no one has bought it then it gets returned. If all of the people who came through our doors in that 6 month period passed up buying that book, well then it gets sent back for something else. I've found that in this neighborhood lots of folks want their classics cheap and used (or downloaded for free)--things we've chosen not to do. We tried the used book route but when one of the main criteria is cheap, well we just can't compete with $.69. We do, however, order in things for folks all the time. Most academics realize that their tastes often run a bit to the obscure and that the economics of a small store mean that we can't possibly stock all the university press titles we'd like to, not to mention that the small press runs of many academic titles means a microscopic discount for the store. We don't serve coffee because we don't want to cut into Meshuggah's business, nor do we have much room for hanging out--we're only 1200 square feet. And what I actually said was that the overwhelming majority of the comments were good and that we were seriously studying the bad ones to see what we needed to fix. That part just got left out of the article. And I'm hoping you'll notice the changes we've made and the programs we’ve instituted and the massive effort we're undertaking to become more a part of the community. That was something I always felt we were lacking in and I think we've made a start in addressing it. And as with the survey, I truly appreciate the feedback and your taking the time to respond to the article.--Kelly

Nikki
Nikki

There are record stores all over St. Louis. Euclid Records just opened a second location in New Orleans, and vinyl sales are higher than they've been in decades.

 
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