St. Louis Art Capsules

Jessica Baran encapsulates the St. Louis art scene

Richard Aldrich and the 19th Century French Painting The uniform 84-by-58-inch white-primed canvases that compose New York-based painter Richard Aldrich's exhibition appear, in their close-hung repetition, like pages in a notebook. Upon each page paper clippings, splints of wood or the erratic trace of a brush's single gesture are collected, producing the effect of a most intimate journal, perhaps written by a cloud. The gestural focus is underscored by what is presented as Aldrich's historical forebears, a select four paintings, drawn from the Saint Louis Art Museum's collection, by French intimist painters Vuillard and Bonnard (with one Irishman's self-portrait added, for discontinuity's sake). These nineteenth-century footnotes, describing in obsessional detail daily artifacts such as fruit, the domestic space and the more immemorial varieties of light, place Aldrich's contemporary fixations (Syd Barrett, slide film, BAM Cinema ticket stubs) firmly in an elegant tradition. Granted, these "newer" artifacts are throwbacks in themselves, suggesting a more complex relationship to the daily in which the present, and our most banal and intimate moments, are no longer a safe source for nonderivative authenticity but yet another space to compose the myth of oneself. Our masterpiece is, indeed, the private life. Through May 1 at Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, 3750 Washington Boulevard; 314-535-4660 or www.camstl.org. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat. (open till 8 on Thu.), 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sun.

Saturday the Birds Fell from the Sky The End of Days will arrive in spectral hues straight out of Repo Man. So sayeth the local duo of Cameron Fuller and Travis Russell. A car patched together from cardboard, sporting a wood-grain motif, seems to have fallen, along with the birds of this exhibition's title, from somewhere lofty and dystopic, depositing a neon-colored faux oil spill at its point of impact. The gallery walls are papered with images of the gorgeously bombed-out buildings so familiar to St. Louisans, which loom not with menace but with punk impunity. No one here is pointing a finger at urban decay, but at those who fail to see its majesty. Faceted mock-Brancusi columns made of cardboard and painted black punctuate the space, their angularity echoed in trompe l'oeil "drawings" (made with tape) and in a cardboard nook tucked into a corner. In this grotto's black-lit inner sanctum, neon handprints and meaningless hieroglyphs aglow on the walls, it's nearly impossible not to experience the kind of heedless, unaffected happiness a childhood fort once brought. Think of this show as a diorama depicting joy's brazen revolt against lost youth and the world's imminent collapse. Through April 9 at Good Citizen Gallery, 2247 Gravois Avenue; 314-348-4587 or www.goodcitizenstl.com. Hours: noon-5 p.m. Fri.-Sat. and by appointment.

Do Ho Suh, Staircase ‑ Pulitzer Version, 2010. Polyester fabric and stainless steel rods, 246 3/8 x 247 9/16 x 246 inches
Do Ho Suh and Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York.
Do Ho Suh, Staircase ‑ Pulitzer Version, 2010. Polyester fabric and stainless steel rods, 246 3/8 x 247 9/16 x 246 inches Do Ho Suh and Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York.

William Kentridge: Two Films The animated shorts Weighing...and Wanting (1998) and Journey to the Moon (2003) embody South African artist William Kentridge's signature stop-motion technique, in which single charcoal drawings are erased and redrawn to form atmospheric narratives of a post-apartheid culture. Moving between the personal and political, Kentridge's invented alter-ego, the industrialist Soho Eckstein, rises and falls in from the small heaps of charcoal detritus, allegorizing attempts to resurrect personal integrity, if not a fresh national identity. Also showing — Visual Musings: Prints by William Kentridge Two recent series of hybrid aquatint, drypoint and engraved prints are also on view, one inspired by Nikolai Gogol's short story "The Nose"; the other, Thinking Aloud, a fantasia of personal imagery. Other prints explore Kentridge's long-time relationship to theater and, in this case, opera, with themes from Mozart's Magic Flute and Shostakovich's adaptation of "The Nose" putting in frequent appearances. Through May 22 at the Saint Louis Art Museum, 1 Fine Arts Drive (in Forest Park); 314-721-0072 or www.slam.org. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sun. (10 a.m.-9 p.m. Fri.)

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