Perhaps you can understand, after a wave of hateful legislation and a galling discussion by justices and attorneys in the country's highest court, that there are those who are not content with jurisprudence.

All this legal eloquence comes after generations of families picked crops on their way to citizenship, only to encounter lawyers and lawmakers who are worse than any field boss.

Monica Alonzo's father crossed the border from Mexico. His family worked in the cotton fields. They earned less, picked more and kept their mouths shut. Kids in school were slapped if they were overheard speaking Spanish.

Arizona Governor Jan Brewer signing SB 1070 into law.
Stephen Lemons
Arizona Governor Jan Brewer signing SB 1070 into law.

Details

The U.S. Supreme Court will rule this month on legislation that forces police to scrutinize Latinos, both immigrants and citizens. President Barack Obama has deported 1.5 million people. And 41 states are attempting to limit the voting rights of young people and minorities. In this week's special feature, "Crossing the Line," Village Voice Media offers a selection of viewpoints and artwork to honor the passing of the American dream.

Days of Rage: Phoenix-based Village Voice Media columnist Stephen Lemons suggest that civil disobedience might provide the answer to the immigration debate.

Welcome Back, Jim Crow: From Miami, a report from Chuck Strouse about how new voting laws might well take out Obama this fall.

Love the Beans, Hate the Beaner: "Ask a Mexican" columnist Gustavo Arellano notes that Americans' love of south-of-the-border cuisine is at odds with our politics.

"They mistreated the Mexicans the worst in El Mirage [Arizona]," says Alonzo. "Mexicans went straight to jail or were roughed up for minor offenses."

"They were made to feel like worthless people," she recalls. "Many Mexicans instilled in their children the importance of speaking only English. Not in my house. For my father, the treatment created a lot of resentment towards whites. We weren't allowed to speak English at home for some time. We would get in trouble if he knew we were mixing with the Anglos."

There was a common warning in her home: "Beware of the blue-eyes."

Alonzo says her family and their friends feared deportation, even after they were living here legally.

"They didn't want to draw attention to themselves."

That's done and gone.

In Arizona thousands have taken to the street in protest against SB 1070. Grandmas are joined by kids without papers. Together they commit civil disobedience and force arrests.

The Supreme Court doesn't grasp that its decision is not the final word on the subject.

Media everywhere erupted with the recent news that whites now account for a minority of births in America for the first time. Latinos have the highest fertility rate and are already the largest minority.

"If [reform] doesn't happen as part of a revolution," says Alonzo, "the sheer numbers will eventually force change."

See that little roly-poly, hija rock & rolly, wearing Pull-Ups, sporting earrings and sitting on her mama's lap?

She is your future.

More from "Crossing the Line":

Days of Rage: Phoenix-based Village Voice Media columnist Stephen Lemons suggest that civil disobedience might provide the answer to the immigration debate.

Welcome Back, Jim Crow: From Miami, a report from Chuck Strouse about how new voting laws might well take out Obama this fall.

Love the Beans, Hate the Beaner: "Ask a Mexican" columnist Gustavo Arellano notes that Americans' love of south-of-the-border cuisine is at odds with our politics.

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