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The Jazz Edge Orchestra

Every fourth Sunday, 6-8:30 p.m.
phone 314-966-2739
deblaze@gmail.com

Recognized as a dynamic, driving and versatile ensemble, TJEO delivers original charts combined with exciting contemporary R&B, soul and blues. Under the direction of Thomas Moore, its unmatched menu of rhythmic renditions yields great creativity and depth. TJEO has performed with giants Clark Terry, Lester Bowie, James Moody, Frank Foster, Oliver Nelson, Jr., Keyon Harrold, Russell Gunn, Denise Thimes, Frank Wess, Chuck Berry, Geri Allen, The Cunninghams, Wallace Roney and plenty more at venues like Powell Symphony Hall, The St. Louis Arch, and St. Louis Science Center. $10 cover

http://www.kirkwoodstationbrewing.com
Kirkwood Station Brewing Company (map)
105 E. Jefferson Ave
Kirkwood
phone 314-966-2739
The Jazz Edge Orchestra

Audubon and Beyond

Mondays-Thursdays, 7:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Continues through June 15, 2017
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Among those of the ornithological persuasion, the St. Louis region is of prime interest because of our natural flyways. The Mississippi River underwrites that status; it's a superhighway for migrating birds. We have another feathered fact to boast about: While the renowned birdman John James Audubon was still alive, the St. Louis Mercantile Library acquired a rare reserved copy of his masterwork, Birds of America, from his family. This is tantamount to owning a Gutenberg Bible. Celebrate it with the exhibit Audubon and Beyond: Collecting Five Centuries of Natural History at the St. Louis Mercantile Library on the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus (1 University Drive at Natural Bridge Road; 314-516-7240 or www.umsl.edu/mercantile). The extensive exhibit incorporates sections relating to not only birds but also reptiles, mammals, fish, insects, humans, astronomy, geology, meteorology and more. Audubon and Beyond is open 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and noon to 8 p.m. Sunday (November 9 through June 2017). Admission is free. free admission

University of Missouri-St. Louis-Mercantile Library (map)
1 University Dr. at Natural Bridge Road
North St. Louis County
phone 314-516-7240
Audubon and Beyond

Tom Hackney: Corresponding Squares -- Painting the Chess Games of Marcel Duchamp

Wednesdays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Mondays, Tuesdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 11

French avant-garde artist Marcel Duchamp was an avowed chess fanatic. While the analytical portion of Duchamp's brain was playing the game, his artistic side was enchanted with the patterns created by the movement of his pieces. Inspired by Duchamp's unique view of chess, British artist Tom Hackney created geometric paintings of individual games, particularly those played by Duchamp himself. Chess Painting No. 54 (Michel vs. Duchamp, Strasbourg, 1924) features criss-crossing yellow slashes left by both bishops’ progress, the red charge of the king’s knight ending prematurely in an apparent capture, and a white defensive wall of pawns dominating the central foreground. free admission

World Chess Hall of Fame (map)
4652 Maryland Ave
St. Louis - Central West End
phone 314-367-9243
Tom Hackney: Corresponding Squares -- Painting the Chess Games of Marcel Duchamp

Tell Me on a Sunday

Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 27

Andrew Lloyd Webber may be synonymous with big-cast, bigger-budget musicals, but he wasn't always that way. His rarely-produced show Tell Me on a Sunday is an intimate, one-woman show — that's technically the smallest cast possible. The 1979 production is about a girl from North London who comes to America with hopes of finding happiness and a green card, only to discover that American men (and American culture) can alter you in subtle ways. Sarah Porter stars as Emma in New Line Theatre's season-ending performance of Tell Me on a Sunday. It's performed at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday (August 11 to 27) at the Marcelle Theater (3310 Samuel Shepard Drive; www.newlinetheatre.comwww.newlinetheatre.com). Tickets are $15 to $25. $15-$25

Marcelle Theater (map)
3310 Samuel Shepard Dr
St. Louis - Grand Center Tell Me on a Sunday

St. Lou Fringe Fest

Thursdays-Sundays. Continues through Aug. 27
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St. Lou Fringe Fest is back in its new late-summer slot with even more performances (109 different shows) spread across seven venues in Grand Center throughout the next two weeks (August 19 to 27; www.stlfringe.com). From hyper-political puppet shows (Big Hair, Big Dreams: The Mini Donald Trump Musical) to Shakespearean cabaret (Origins of Love), this year's Fringe Fest has something for everyone. No show costs more than $15 to see, and your best value is one of the super-affordable ticket packages — how does five shows for $37 sound? Great, right? $15 or less

Grand Center (map)
N. Grand Blvd. & Lindell Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-1884
St. Lou Fringe Fest

Impressions of War

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Feb. 12, 2017

War is often commemorated in statues and portraiture with a political slant. Our generals are heroic and our troops are manly, while the other guys are all slobs and monsters. But some artists document war without an official commission. Francisco de Goya made his print series The Disasters of War during Napoleon's occupation of Spain, and de Goya pulled no punches in depicting the inhumanity, cruelty and depredations wrought in the name of conquest. These 80 prints are part of Impressions of War, the new exhibition in galleries 234 and 235 at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park (www.slam.org). Impressions of War also includes Max Beckmann's portfolio Hell, which he created in Berlin in the immediate aftermath of World War I. Jacque Callot's series on the religious wars that rent apart Europe in the mid-1800s and Daniel Heyman's Amman Portfolio — the story of what occurred in Abu Ghraib prison, as told by Iraqi inmates — are also part of the exhibit. Impressions of War is on display from August 5 to February 12, 2017. The museum is open Tuesday through Sunday, and admission is free. free admission

Japanese Painting & Calligraphy: Highlights from the Collection

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Feb. 12, 2017

Despite its recent expansion, the Saint Louis Art Museum (www.slam.org) does not have enough space to display all the art in its various collections. This is why exhibitions are rotated periodically, and it's also why the new show Japanese Painting & Calligraphy: Highlights from the Collection is noteworthy. A pair of folding screens painted by Kaihō Yūshō in the sixteenth century are the main draw, having not been on display for seven years. Yūshō painted an ethereal landscape using ink and gold that represents the illusory nature of the material world. Japanese Painting and Calligraphy is on display Tuesday through Sunday (August 19 to February 12) in gallery 225. Admission is free. free admission

The Ordinary Must Not Be Dull: Claes Oldenburg

Wednesdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through Oct. 15

Pop artist Claes Oldenburg set himself counter to the staid abstract expressionists who ruled the modern art world in the '50s with his sense of humor and his flair for the dramatic. His oversized, brightly-colored sculptures of familiar objects such as lipstick and three-way plugs were ridiculed in the early days, but are now recognized as important works by a major artist. The Pulitzer Arts Foundation's (3716 Washington Boulevard; www.pulitzerarts.org) new exhibit, The Ordinary Must Not Be Dull: Claes Oldenburg's Soft Sculptures, showcases a selection of some of the artist's most playful works. Soft Switches (1964) is a ductile pair of light switches in glistening red, gravity tugging them into bonk-eyed uselessness, but Oldenburg's Green Beans (1964) are a Jolly Green Giant-sized pile of viridian pods with plump, glistening beans peeking out of either end. The Ordinary Must Not Be Dull opens with a free reception from 6 to 9 p.m. on Friday, July 29. Oldenbug's sculptures remain on display through Saturday, October 15, at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation (3716 Washington Boulevard; www.pulitzerarts.org). Admission is free, and the museum is open Wednesday through Saturday. free admission

Pulitzer Arts Foundation (map)
3716 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-754-1850
The Ordinary Must Not Be Dull: Claes Oldenburg

Inherit the Wind

Sundays, 2 p.m. and Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 28

Bert Cates teaches his high school class about the theory of evolution, an act that's illegal in his unnamed home state in the 1920s. The great orator Matthew Harrison Brady comes to town to prosecute the case, while famous attorney Henry Drummond offers to defend Cates. The outcome is never in doubt, but Drummond takes a heroic stand in defense of intellectual freedom and the rights of man to exercise free will. Jerome Lawrence and Robert Edwin Lee's drama Inherit the Wind fictionalizes the Scopes Monkey Trial, but the play is built on the bones of the McCarthy witch hunts. Insight Theatre Company closes its current season with Inherit the Wind. Performances are at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday (August 12 to 28) at the Heagney Theatre (530 East Lockwood Avenue, Webster Groves; www.insighttheatrecompany.com). Tickets are $10 to $35. $10-$35

Heagney Theatre (map)
530 E. Lockwood Ave.
Webster Groves
phone 314-968-1505
Inherit the Wind

Kindertransport

Sundays, 2 p.m. and Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Sept. 4

England's kindertransport program was a moment of humanity in the run-up to World War II. Close to 10,000 Jewish children were ushered safely to England after Kristallnacht, but what felt like a miracle for the parents must have felt more like rejection to the youngsters who didn't understand why they were being sent away. Eva is one of the transported. At least she gets a soft landing with Lil, a good-natured woman treats her kindly. But Lil is not Jewish, and makes no effort to maintain any of Judaism's laws or tenets. Diane Samuels' drama Kindertransport is a play about identity and the past — mainly the forgetting of them. Mustard Seed Theatre marks its first decade with the show. Kindertransport is performed at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and at 2 p.m. Sunday (August 19 to September 4) at the Fontbonne University Fine Arts Theatre (6800 Wydown Boulevard; www.mustardseedtheatre.com). Tickets are $30 to $35. $30-$35

Fontbonne University Fine Arts Theatre (map)
6800 Wydown Blvd.
Clayton
phone 314-862-3456
Kindertransport

Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night

Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 5
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There was a time in America when wearing black was reserved only for those mourning the death of a loved one. When did black make the jump to evening wear, and then to everyday use? Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; 314-746-4599 or www.mohistory.org), charts the hue's long journey to daylight through the most versatile of garments. The exhibit showcases more than 60 dresses from the museum's collection, offering a broad view of how women's fashions have changed. The tapered-waist, puff-sleeved "second-day dress" from 1895 (worn by a bride the day after her wedding) looks more uncomfortable and rigid than a mourning dress from the same decade, while the 1933 halter evening gown looks elegant and chic. What a difference 40 years, a world war and the flapper movement makes. Little Black Dress is open daily (April 2 through September 5). Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night

Route 66: Main Street Through St. Louis

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through July 16, 2017

Before the interstate highway system was developed, Route 66 was the safest, fastest way to cross the western half of the country. Starting in Chicago and ending Santa Monica, the "Main Street of America" came right though St. Louis, but not in the mostly straight lines we're accustomed to now. At various points in time, Route 66 traversed Watson Road, Manchester Road, the Martin Luther King Bridge and the Poplar Street Bridge. That shifting route helped spur the growth of cities and businesses along the way, as travelers stopped overnight at the Coral Court Motel or grabbed a bit to eat at the Parkmoor Restaurant. Route 66: Main Street Through St. Louis, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; 314-746-4599 or www.mohistory.org), tells the story of the byway through roadside signs and gas pumps, historic vehicles, bus tours and photographs. Route 66 opens Saturday, June 25, and remains open through July 16, 2017. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
Route 66: Main Street Through St. Louis

Self-Taught Genius

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through Sept. 11

The art world is a vast organism that eventually absorbs and repurposes all ideas, even those of non-artists. While outsider artists — those who are not classically trained but still make visual art — were by definition outside the world of galleries and museums during their lifetimes, the establishment has embraced their work as a valid and even important development. Self-Taught Genius: Treasures from the American Folk Art Museum, the new exhibit at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park (314-721-0072 or www.slam.org), showcases the breadth and depth of non-traditional work throughout American history. The exhibit's organizers at the American Folk Art Museum break down practitioners into seven categories, from Reformers (those who sought to change the world with their output) to Encoders (artists whose work defies understanding by choice). Self-Taught Genius showcases more than 100 objects that span the length of American history, from colonial times to the present. The exhibit is open Tuesday through Sunday (June 19 to September 11). Tickets are $6 to $12 but free on Friday. $6-$12, free on Friday

Annie and the Fur Trappers

Thu., Aug. 25, 6-9 p.m.
phone 314-489-3162

Annie and the Fur Trappers will be playing traditional jazz music at Foam on August 25th. There will be plenty of room for swing dancing. 5.00

Foam Coffee & Beer (map)
3359 Jefferson Ave.
St. Louis - South City
phone 314-772-2100
Annie and the Fur Trappers

Katie Louise

Thu., Aug. 25, 6-9 p.m.
phone 314-349-2850
Howards.soulard@yahoo.com

Never a cover at Howards! Free

Howard's in Soulard (map)
2732 S 13th St
St. Louis - Soulard
phone 314-349-2850
Katie Louise
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