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The Kiss & Tells: The Big Bang

Sun., July 24, 12-4 p.m.
thekissntells@gmail.com

@ R Bar STL, 3960 Chouteau Ave St. Louis, MO 63110
In order to decide the fate of humanity, a council of deities must convene. Intrigues and alliances abound and egos clash as all humankind hangs in the balance. Will this peculiar pantheon decide to pull the plug or will they keep their hands off the population? Does humanity have a future or is it lights out ladies and gents? Guests will be treated to a bawdy night of burlesque, drag, kitschy comedy, variety and more! Featuring the Kiss & Tells and out of town special guest Jessica Jacques (Columbia, MO). GA: $15 VIP: $20

http://thekissandtells.com
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R-Bar (map)
3960 Chouteau Ave
St. Louis - The Grove The Kiss & Tells: The Big Bang

Beer Garden & Fish Fry

Sun., July 24, 12-4 p.m.
phone 618-786-2331
marketing@pmlodge.net
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Featuring live bluegrass music, delicious fried fish and Green Jack Ales. Green Jack Ales are well-known for their “hoppy character”. With malted wheat and barley, traditional English cone hops are blended with hops from the New World in generous proportions to give the ales floral, citrus and fruity aromas. No entry fees or reservations are taken for this event but seating is limited so feel free to bring your lawn chairs and picnic blankets just in case. Come spend a relaxing day filled with entertainment, a gorgeous view, tasty beer, awesome food and an ambiance that cannot be found anywhere Free

http://www.pmlodge.net/2015/11/beer-garden-fish-fry/
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Pere Marquette Lodge (map)
13653 Lodge Blvd.
Grafton/ Godfrey/ Alton
phone 618-786-2331ý
Beer Garden & Fish Fry

Planet of the Apes

Sun., July 24, 2 & 7 p.m.
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Forget, if you can, the iconic ending of the original Planet of the Apes, and consider the rest of the movie. The 1968 film was based on Pierre Boulle's original novel, with a script by Rod Serling that was rewritten by Michael Wilson. It was expensive, it was risky (what major studio was doing serious science fiction in the late '60s?) and it became a massive hit. Everything from Charlton Heston's unforgettable performance, John Chambers' revolutionary makeup effects and the tense, sinewy Jerry Goldsmith score came together in perfect synchronicity. It's an American masterpiece, which is why Turner Classic Movies is celebrating the film with a pair of showings in movies theaters across the country. You can see Planet of the Apes locally at 2 and 7 p.m. today at the Weherenberg Des Peres 14 Cine (12701 Manchester Road, Des Peres; www.fathomevents.com). TCM host Ben Mankiewicz discusses the background of the film and its making as part of the screening. Tickets are $12.50. $12.50

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Wehrenberg Des Peres 14 Cine (map)
12701 Manchester Rd
Des Peres
phone 314-822-4903
Planet of the Apes

Goo Goo Dolls

Sun., July 24, 7 p.m.

w/ Collective Soul, Tribe Society TBA

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Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre (map)
I-70 & Earth City Expwy.
Maryland Heights
phone 314-298-9944

Tom Hackney: Corresponding Squares -- Painting the Chess Games of Marcel Duchamp

Wednesdays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Mondays, Tuesdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 11

French avant-garde artist Marcel Duchamp was an avowed chess fanatic. While the analytical portion of Duchamp's brain was playing the game, his artistic side was enchanted with the patterns created by the movement of his pieces. Inspired by Duchamp's unique view of chess, British artist Tom Hackney created geometric paintings of individual games, particularly those played by Duchamp himself. Chess Painting No. 54 (Michel vs. Duchamp, Strasbourg, 1924) features criss-crossing yellow slashes left by both bishops’ progress, the red charge of the king’s knight ending prematurely in an apparent capture, and a white defensive wall of pawns dominating the central foreground. free admission

World Chess Hall of Fame (map)
4652 Maryland Ave
St. Louis - Central West End
phone 314-367-9243
Tom Hackney: Corresponding Squares -- Painting the Chess Games of Marcel Duchamp

From Caravans to Courts: Textiles from the Silk Road

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 21

The Silk Road carried goods and trade items from China to Europe, which fostered the exchange of different cultures and artistic styles. One of the most prized of Eastern artistic items was the carpet. These textiles incorporated sacred symbols, tribal iconography and traditional patterns, depending on who wove them. A carpet made by Central Asian nomads doesn't look like one made by Indian artisans, despite Europeans lumping them all under the catch-all descriptor "Oriental rug." From Caravans to Courts: Textiles from the Silk Road, the new exhibition in gallery 100 at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park (314-721-0072 or www.slam.org), features ten carpets that exemplify the high level of artistry and craftsmanship found in traditional Asian textile work. The exhibit is open Tuesday through Sunday (April 1 to August 21), and admission is free. free admission

Urban Wanderers

Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through July 24
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Stray Rescue regularly finds dogs in terrible conditions and worse shape and then works hard to heal them so they can be happily adopted. More than 80 artists were invited to create art inspired by Stray Rescue's success stories for the exhibition Urban Wanderers. Photographs, paintings and sculptures of the dogs who made it will fill the Saint Louis University Museum of Art (3663 Lindell Boulevard; www.strayrescue.org) tonight from 5 to 8 p.m. for the opening reception. And along with the artworks will be some of the dogs, some of which also made their own portraits (with paint and paws). All of the work will be auctioned off online to raise money for Stray Rescue's ongoing mission of mercy. The show remains up through July 24. free admission

Julian Rosefeldt: American Night

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 7

You'll swear that a certain squint-eyed, mustachioed man in Julian Rosefeldt's five-channel film installation American Night is Charles Bronson -- but you'll be wrong. Instead, the man is an actor, one of several in the film who resembles an archetypal cowboy film star. American Night is shot in widescreen, 16mm CinemaScope -- a popular format for the Western -- and uses actual dialogue from classic films, George W. Bush's speeches and footage of modern combat troops to show how the mythology of the Hollywood Western has infiltrated American culture and politics. It's a long hard look at the fictions that drive our reality, as seen by an outsider (Rosefeldt is German). free admission

Great Rivers Biennial 2016

Wednesdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 14

Lyndon Barrois Jr., Nanette Boileau and Tate Foley are the winners of the 2016 Great Rivers Biennial, CAM’s ongoing program that recognizes local artists with a cash prize and a solo show in the museum. Barrois incorporates sculpture, installation and painting in Of Color, which comprises eight life-size assemblages and an asphalt basketball court. The pieces are all abstractions of human identities represented by shoes and clothing, challenging the viewer’s perceptions of race and socio-economic background. Boileau exhibits the three-channel video installation Dakota Territory, which documents the lives of Wyoming and South Dakota ranchers in the style of a biologist’s field notes. Her work strips away the mythology of the frontier from the reality of the contemporary American West. Printer and bookmaker Foley attacks the weighted value of language in his large-scale sculptures and videos. He uses printing technology from the 1980s to create phonetically spelled words out of wheat paste, which are then attached to his free-standing sculptures. The accompanying videos use hand-painted words, also spelled phonetically, to further separate words from their accepted meanings. free admission

Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (map)
3750 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-535-4660
Great Rivers Biennial 2016

The Drowsy Chaperone

Tuesdays-Fridays, 8 p.m., Saturdays, 4 & 8 p.m., Sundays, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sundays, 2 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 21, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Continues through Aug. 14

A few years ago, Stages St. Louis presented an excellent production of The Drowsy Chaperone. Audiences have clamored for a return engagement, and for its 30th anniversary season, Stages St. Louis gives the people what they want. The musical tells the story of the Man in the Chair, a lonely New Yorker whose only solace is his large collection of cast albums from Broadway shows. Paramount among them: his prized edition of the 1920s Jazz Age gem, The Drowsy Chaperone. As he plays it again, the show comes to life in his apartment, right before our eyes. It's fast-paced and funny, with songs that celebrate everything goofy and grand about the Golden Age of stage musicals. David Schmittou reprises his role as the Man in the Chair, and Edward Juvier returns as the dramatic lover, Adolpho. It's a near-perfect show that will improve your week. It took the combined talents of Lisa Lambert, Greg Morrison, Bob Martin and Don McKellar to bring this production to the stage, so don't let their efforts go to waste. The Drowsy Chaperone is performed Tuesday through Sunday (July 22 to August 1) at the Robert G. Reim Theatre (111 South Geyer Road; www.stagesstlouis.org). Tickets are $46 to $62. $46-$62

Robert G. Reim Theatre (map)
111 S. Geyer Road
Kirkwood
phone 314-821-2407
The Drowsy Chaperone

Grey Gardens -- The Musical

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m. Continues through July 30

Albert and David Maysles' iconic 1975 documentary Grey Gardens captures the precarious situation of Edith and Edie Beale. The reclusive mother-daughter team was holed up in their run-down East Hamptons mansion, which they shared with various raccoons and glorious memories of Little Edie's salad days. It would have been just another hard-luck tale for a once-wealthy family, except the Beales were direct relations of Jackie Kennedy. The hermetic dream world the two lived in, Little Edie's fabulous fashion sense and the cheerful-mournful dynamic between them has been translated into the musical Grey Gardens, with book by Doug Wright, music by Scott Frankel and lyrics by Michael Korie. Max & Louie Productions presents the highly anticipated Grey Gardens -- The Musical at 8 p.m. Wednesday to Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday (July 8 through 30) in the Wool Studio Theatre at the Jewish Community Center (2 Millstone Campus Drive, Creve Coeur; www.maxandlouie.com). Tickets are $35 to $45. $35-$45

Jewish Community Center-Wool Studio Theatre (map)
2 Millstone Campus Drive
Maryland Heights
phone 314-442-3283
Grey Gardens -- The Musical

John & Jen

Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m. Continues through July 31

Andrew Lippa and Tom Greenwald's musical John & Jen is the story of a young woman who vows to protect her little brother from their abusive father during childhood, but finds that keeping her promise means never engaging with her own best future. Her choice ultimately costs Jen her brother John, but she gets a second chance with her own son, also named John. But too often history repeats itself, and it's difficult if not impossible to escape the curse of turning into your own parents. This is an unusual musical that explores the stages of womanhood and the familiar but always strange terrain of brother-sister relationships, as well as the mother-son dynamic. Insight Theatre Company presents John & Jen at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday (July 15 to 31) at the Heagney Theatre (530 East Lockwood Avenue, Webster Groves; www.insighttheatrecompany.com). Tickets are $10 to $35. $10-$35

Heagney Theatre (map)
530 E. Lockwood Ave.
Webster Groves
phone 314-968-1505
John & Jen

The LaBute New Theater Festival

Sundays, 3 p.m. and Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through July 31

St. Louis Actors' Studio's LaBute New Theater Festival is your chance to experience seven new, bracing one-act plays by emerging and established playwrights in an intimate setting. The format breaks the program into two sets of two weekends, with a new play by Neil LaBute as a linchpin for both programs. The festival is better attended every year, with rapt, attentive audiences the norm and not the exception (no damn cellphone interruptions). The LaBute New Theater Festival takes place at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and at 3 p.m. Sunday (July 8 to 31) at the Gaslight Theater (358 North Boyle Avenue; www.stlas.org). Set one of the plays is performed July 8 to 17, and set two takes place from July 22 to 31. Tickets are $30 to $35. $30-$35

Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night

Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 5
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There was a time in America when wearing black was reserved only for those mourning the death of a loved one. When did black make the jump to evening wear, and then to everyday use? Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; 314-746-4599 or www.mohistory.org), charts the hue's long journey to daylight through the most versatile of garments. The exhibit showcases more than 60 dresses from the museum's collection, offering a broad view of how women's fashions have changed. The tapered-waist, puff-sleeved "second-day dress" from 1895 (worn by a bride the day after her wedding) looks more uncomfortable and rigid than a mourning dress from the same decade, while the 1933 halter evening gown looks elegant and chic. What a difference 40 years, a world war and the flapper movement makes. Little Black Dress is open daily (April 2 through September 5). Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night

Route 66: Main Street Through St. Louis

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through July 16, 2017

Before the interstate highway system was developed, Route 66 was the safest, fastest way to cross the western half of the country. Starting in Chicago and ending Santa Monica, the "Main Street of America" came right though St. Louis, but not in the mostly straight lines we're accustomed to now. At various points in time, Route 66 traversed Watson Road, Manchester Road, the Martin Luther King Bridge and the Poplar Street Bridge. That shifting route helped spur the growth of cities and businesses along the way, as travelers stopped overnight at the Coral Court Motel or grabbed a bit to eat at the Parkmoor Restaurant. Route 66: Main Street Through St. Louis, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; 314-746-4599 or www.mohistory.org), tells the story of the byway through roadside signs and gas pumps, historic vehicles, bus tours and photographs. Route 66 opens Saturday, June 25, and remains open through July 16, 2017. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
Route 66: Main Street Through St. Louis
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