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Print Bazaar on Cherokee

Sat., Dec. 3, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

This is a tough time of year for people who hate shopping for gifts. Maybe you loathe the task because you make terrible decisions, or maybe you're just not cut out for the mall scene. Whatever the reason, you still have to find something heartfelt, personal and unique for the special people in your life. Guess what? Those adjectives pretty much describe the art of printmaking, and this Saturday is Print Bazaar on Cherokee. The annual sale of works by the city's finest printmakers features dozens of artists selling handmade, idiosyncratic pieces for a fair price. From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. you can roam Cherokee Street looking for the art that speaks to your soul. Maybe it's the "off-kilter view" of seasoned printmaker Arden Goewert. Perhaps you'll find it at the inclusive, LGBT-friendly Westminster Press (3156 Cherokee Street). Printmaking is a democratic art — it's made by all kinds of people, for all kinds of people. Get out there and get you some. There will be artist demonstrations, on-site framing and food trucks. Visit www.cherokeeprintbazaar.com for the full list of artists and participating locations. free admission

Cherokee Street (map)
Lemp Ave. & Cherokee St.
St. Louis - South City Print Bazaar on Cherokee

RFT Holiday Spirits

Sat., Dec. 3, 7-10 p.m.

If you've been banned from the company Christmas party this year, come to ours. RFT Holiday Spirits gives you hors d'oeuvres, unlimited craft cocktail tastings and a commemorative tasting glass, and you won't even have to see your boss dancing. Wood Hat Spirits, Saint Louis Distillery and Narwhal's Crafted Urban Ice proffer specially concocted winter-theme cocktails, while local businesses Anthonino's Taverna, Beast Craft BBQ and the Kitchen Sink handle the food. DJ Alexis Tucci -- Nightchaser will create a lively atmosphere for the evening; you get all of this for just $30. RFT Holiday Spirits takes place from 7 to 10 p.m. tonight at Delmar Hall (6133 Delmar Boulevard; www.rftholidayspirits.com). $30

Delmar Hall (map)
6133 Delmar Blvd.
Delmar/ The Loop
phone 314-726-6161
RFT Holiday Spirits

Bruno David Fall Exhibitions

Wednesdays-Saturdays. Continues through Dec. 23

It was slightly delayed, but the Bruno David Gallery's fall show is now open at its new home. It's a big exhibition, too, with six artists — Chris Kahler, Ann Wimsatt, Sarah Harford, Kahlil Irving, Michael Jantzen and Van McElwee —all presenting new work. For Wimsatt, Irving and Harford, this is their inaugural show with the gallery. The paintings in Wimsatt's Not a Passive Journey begin as small watercolors of a city's public places and skylines, but they are then digitally modified in an echo of the constant growth and accretion that takes place in urban environments. Undocumented displays masses of Irving's ceramic forms, which are stand-ins for bodies. His formations symbolize gatherings — either social in nature (say, a party or family reunion) or advocating for social justice (marches and rallies). Harford's installation Swing is a chandelier made of broken automotive headlights and taillights. The still-functional lights are controlled by a timer, which turns them on suddenly and throws broken shadows around the room, or shuts off suddenly and leaves darkness. The show opens with a free reception from 5 to 9 p.m. Thursday, November 10, at Bruno David Gallery (7513 Forsyth Boulevard, Clayton; www.brunodavidgallery.com). The show continues through December 23, and the gallery is open Wednesday to Saturday. free admission

Bruno David Gallery (map)
7513 Forsyth Blvd.
Clayton
phone 314-531-3030
Bruno David Fall Exhibitions

Driving Miss Daisy

Saturdays, 8 p.m., Wednesdays, Thursdays, 7:30 p.m., Sun., Dec. 4, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun., Dec. 11, 2 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 18, 2 p.m. Continues through Dec. 18

Daisy Werthan's driving days are done. She's wrecked another car, and her son Boolie orders her to use the chauffeur he's hired. But that doesn't mean she has to like it. She resents her driver, Hoke, and treats him poorly, and not just because he's a black man. In the Georgia of 1948, however, it's not like an older Jewish woman and her black driver are going to be friends. Still, despite their cultural differences, Daisy and Hoke have a lot in common, as they discover throughout the course of their long relationship. New Jewish Theatre continues its season with Alfred Uhry's Pulitzer Prize winning drama Driving Miss Daisy. Performances take place at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, 8 p.m. Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday (December 1 to 18) in the Wool Studio Theatre at the Jewish Community Center (2 Millstone Campus Drive, Creve Coeur; www.newjewishtheatre.org). Tickets are $39.50 to $43.50. $39.50-$43.50

Jewish Community Center-Wool Studio Theatre (map)
2 Millstone Campus Drive
Maryland Heights
phone 314-442-3283
Driving Miss Daisy

Buyer & Cellar

Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Dec. 17

The rich ain't like you and me — their incredible resources allow them to make their dreams a reality, no matter how ludicrous they might be. Barbra Streisand, for example, has created a faux shopping mall in the basement of her mansion to house her collections of vintage clothes, furniture, dolls and other indulgences. They're arranged in shops designed to mimic a turn-of-the-century Main Street shopping district. This is all true, by the way. Jonathan Tolins' one-man comedy Buyer & Cellar gussies up the absurd real-life situation by imagining that Babs has hired someone to create displays and maintain the stores — that's where Alex comes in. He's an out-of-work actor who gets to be Streisand's subterranean shop boy, and soon find himself engaging in improv with her. It's an odd show, but a funny one. Stray Dog Theatre presents Buyer & Cellar at 8 p.m. Thursday to Saturday (December 1 to 17) at the Tower Grove Abbey (2336 Tennessee Avenue; www.straydogtheatre.org). Tickets are $20 to $25. $20-$25

Tower Grove Abbey (map)
2336 Tennessee Ave.
St. Louis - South Grand
phone 314-865-1995
Buyer & Cellar

Impressions of War

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Feb. 12, 2017

War is often commemorated in statues and portraiture with a political slant. Our generals are heroic and our troops are manly, while the other guys are all slobs and monsters. But some artists document war without an official commission. Francisco de Goya made his print series The Disasters of War during Napoleon's occupation of Spain, and de Goya pulled no punches in depicting the inhumanity, cruelty and depredations wrought in the name of conquest. These 80 prints are part of Impressions of War, the new exhibition in galleries 234 and 235 at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park (www.slam.org). Impressions of War also includes Max Beckmann's portfolio Hell, which he created in Berlin in the immediate aftermath of World War I. Jacque Callot's series on the religious wars that rent apart Europe in the mid-1800s and Daniel Heyman's Amman Portfolio — the story of what occurred in Abu Ghraib prison, as told by Iraqi inmates — are also part of the exhibit. Impressions of War is on display from August 5 to February 12, 2017. The museum is open Tuesday through Sunday, and admission is free. free admission

Saint Louis Art Museum (map)
1 Fine Arts Dr
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-721-0072
Impressions of War

Japanese Painting & Calligraphy: Highlights from the Collection

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Feb. 12, 2017

Despite its recent expansion, the Saint Louis Art Museum (www.slam.org) does not have enough space to display all the art in its various collections. This is why exhibitions are rotated periodically, and it's also why the new show Japanese Painting & Calligraphy: Highlights from the Collection is noteworthy. A pair of folding screens painted by Kaihō Yūshō in the sixteenth century are the main draw, having not been on display for seven years. Yūshō painted an ethereal landscape using ink and gold that represents the illusory nature of the material world. Japanese Painting and Calligraphy is on display Tuesday through Sunday (August 19 to February 12) in gallery 225. Admission is free. free admission

Saint Louis Art Museum (map)
1 Fine Arts Dr
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-721-0072
Japanese Painting & Calligraphy: Highlights from the Collection

St. Charles Christmas Traditions

Sundays, 12-5 p.m., Saturdays, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. and Wednesdays, Fridays, 6-9 p.m. Continues through Dec. 24

How many Santas is too many? Because St. Charles Christmas Traditions has enough Santas to field a couple of basketball teams. The familiar St. Nicholas and Kris Kringle patrol the streets of historic downtown St. Charles (South Main Street and Jackson Street, St. Charles; www.historicstcharles.com), and so do the lesser-known Frontier Santa and Civil War Santa. When you throw in Santa's assorted helpers — Germany's Knecht Ruprecht, who accompanies St. Nicholas; Snegurochka, Russia's Snow Maiden; Le Befana, the Italian woman who preceded Santa with small gifts — and you could make a basketball league. More than 50 holiday figures from around the world are part of St. Charles Christmas Traditions, and each of them has a trading card you can collect. There are even special "bonus cards" for Christmas baddies such as the Krampus, the Ice Queen and Dwight Schrute's favorite, Belsnickel. While you're seeking out these festive friends, you can enjoy shopping, holiday carolers, a fife-and-drum corps and season treats. St. Charles Christmas Traditions opens with a big brouhaha from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, November 25. The fun resumes from 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesday and Friday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday (November 26 to December 24). Admission is free. free admission

St. Charles Christmas Traditions (map)
S. Main St. and Jackson St.
St. Charles St. Charles Christmas Traditions

Radar Home, 11.8.13: New Work by Amy Reidel

Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Saturdays, 12-8 p.m. and Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 14, 2017

St. Louis artist Amy Reidel draws her inspiration from color MRIs, family portraits and weather radar imagery. Nobody who has lived in the Midwest for any length of time can fail to see the menace implicit in the deep reds of a heavy storm looming over the metro area. By overlaying that data on the face of a relative, Reidel combines the predictive powers of technology with the emotional patterns we learn to recognize from infancy. The result is imagery that speaks to our sense of home and security, and the threatening nature of the outside world -- and those we let in. free admission

Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900
Radar Home, 11.8.13: New Work by Amy Reidel

U.S. Bank Wild Lights

Wednesdays-Sundays, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Through Dec. 23, 5:30-8:30 p.m. and Through Dec. 30, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Continues through Dec. 11

Don't take your kids to any old holiday light display — take them to one of the ten best zoo light displays in America, as ranked by USA Today. U.S. Bank Wild Lights at the Saint Louis Zoo (1 Government Drive; www.stlzoo.org) opens this weekend from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Friday to Sunday (November 25 to 27), and it's currently in the running for the best of the bunch (voting continues online through December 5 if you want to weigh in). U.S. Bank Wild Lights offers light displays, sure, but families can also enjoy stories, campfire s'mores, ice carving demonstrations on weekends and special nighttime viewings of Kali the polar bear, Penguin & Puffin Coast, the Monsanto Insectarium and the Sea Lion Sound exhibition. Sessions resume from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday to Sunday (November 30 to December 11, and then every night except Christmas Eve and Christmas from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. (December 14 to 30). Tickets are $7 to $10, and kids younger than two are free. $7-$10

Saint Louis Zoo (map)
1 Government Dr
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-781-0900
U.S. Bank Wild Lights

Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form

Wednesdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through May 13, 2017

Italian sculptor Medardo Rosso was ahead of his time. Rather than creating heroic sculptures of figures from myth or doing a lucrative business in the monumental bronzes that were popular in the late nineteenth century, Rosso's sculptures seem to be caught emerging from bronze or wax. These almost-manifesting faces and forms are incredibly responsive to light, giving his work a fluid, ephemeral nature not often associated with sculpture. Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form, the new exhibition at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation (3716 Washington Boulevard; www.pulitzerarts.org), includes almost 100 examples of the artist's best work, including some of his photographs and drawings. Experiments in Light and Form opens with a free reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, November 11. The show continues through May 13, and the museum is open Wednesday through Saturday. Admission is free. free admission

Pulitzer Arts Foundation (map)
3716 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-754-1850
Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form

Real/Radical/Psychological: The Collection on Display

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 17, 2017

Washington University's Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts and the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum both celebrate tenth anniversaries this year. The birthday duo share a joint party with the opening of Real/Radical/Psychological: The Collection on Display, an exhibition that showcases work drawn from the museum's deep collection, which was begun in 1881. Three curators have organized the show into three sections that explore how our ideas of what's real, what's radical and what's psychological (artistically speaking) has changed. The opening reception includes live music, food trucks, open studios and demos by Sam Fox School artists and a special commission designed by alumnus Ebony G. Patterson in conjunction with La Patisserie Chouquette. The show opens with a free public reception from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday, September 9, at the Mildred Lane Kemper Museum (1 Brookings Drive on Washington University's campus; www.kemperartmuseum.org). The show continues through January 17. Admission is free. free admission

Vita Eruhimovitz: Synthetic Landscapes

Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sundays, 12-5 p.m., Wednesdays, Thursdays, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. and Fridays, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through Dec. 18

Vita Eruhimovitz's new show, Synthetic Landscapes, is all about the artist's fears of a mechanized future and the rise of man-made environments over the natural world. Her mixed-media pieces combine sculptural and electronic elements with traditional painting methods. A vertical abstract painting that could be a noxious landscape has metal washers stuck to its surface; artificial clouds of colored Plexiglass are bolted to the painting in rising tiers. Synthetic Landscapes opens with a free reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, November 4, at the Kranzberg Arts Center (501 North Grand Boulevard; www.kranzbergartscenter.org). The work remains up through Sunday, December 18, and the gallery is open Wednesday through Sunday. free admission

Buy Tickets
Kranzberg Arts Center (map)
501 N Grand Blvd
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-0367
Vita Eruhimovitz: Synthetic Landscapes

Kelley Walker: Direct Drive

Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 31

American artist Kelley Walker will have his first solo American museum show right here, thanks to the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis. The museum throws wide its doors for Walker, allowing him to take over the entire building with works both old and new. Walker likes to explore the ways an image travels from one culture to the next, and how each culture perceives the image once it is theirs. His new series, Black Star Press, digitally prints chocolate (white, milk and dark) on canvas, depicting images of racial strife in a very unusual medium. As the images in the series are rotated 90 degrees, the power dynamic on display is obscured, altered and eventually reversed. Direct Drive opens with a free reception from 7 to 9 p.m. on Friday, September 16, at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org). The gallery is open Wednesday through Sunday and the show remains up through December 31. Admission is free. free admission

Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (map)
3750 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-535-4660
Kelley Walker: Direct Drive

All Is Calm

Sundays, 2 & 5 p.m. and Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Dec. 4

Peter Rothstein's All Is Calm is perhaps the best Christmas entertainment ever conceived, bar none. There is no nostalgia nor false sentiment in this a capella musical about one of the spontaneous truces that broke across the front lines of World War I. Instead there is a sense of slowly dawning terror as the combatants on both sides realize the war they thought would be over before Christmas turns into a long, nightmarish slog into death. And then on Christmas Eve, they decide to lay down their arms and embrace each other — they chose amity over enmity, and just like that the war stopped ... for the moment. This will be the fourth and final time Mustard Seed Theatre performs All Is Calm, so do not miss it. There are a few new song arrangements and dialogue, and the cast is slightly different, but the heart of the show remains true. All Is Calm is presented at 8 p.m. Thursday to Saturday and at 2 and 5 p.m. Sunday (November 11 to December 4) in the Fontbonne Fine Arts Theatre (6800 Wydown Boulevard; www.mustardseedtheatre.com). Tickets are $30 to $35. $30-$35

Fontbonne University Fine Arts Theatre (map)
6800 Wydown Blvd.
Clayton
phone 314-862-3456
All Is Calm
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