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Arts & Theater This Weekend

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The Gospel According to the Other Mary

Fri., March 24, 8 p.m. and Sun., March 26, 3 p.m.

Composer John Adams and librettist Peter Sellars addressed Handel's Messiah from the twentieth century with their nativity oratorio El Niño. Now, from the stark weirdness of the 21st century, they bookend that work with The Gospel According to the Other Mary, a symphony/operatic mash-up that tells the story of the Passion from the point of view of Mary Magdalene, her sister Martha and their brother Lazarus. It's a massive work that requires a sound designer, a cimbalom (a large hammered dulcimer sized for concert halls), a half-dozen vocalists and the power of a full chorus. This Gospel (a joint reply to Bach and his Passions) weaves in contemporary social narratives from writers such as medieval mystic Hildegard of Bingen and Dorothy Day, the bohemian who converted to Catholicism and advocated for the poor and homeless as part of the Catholic Worker Movement. It's a much more feminine view of the Passion than the version in the Bible. The St. Louis Symphony presents The Gospel According to the Other Mary at 8 p.m. Friday and 3 p.m. Sunday (March 24 and 26) at Powell Hall (718 North Grand Boulevard; www.slso.org). Tickets are $25 to $111. $25-$111

Buy Tickets
Powell Hall (map)
718 N. Grand Blvd
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-534-1700
The Gospel According to the Other Mary

Lot 49

Fri., March 24, 8-11 p.m.
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The Luminary's second installment of Lot 49 is not a celebration of the Thomas Pynchon novella The Crying of Lot 49. It is, rather, an art auction and celebration of local artists, as well as a fundraiser for the host institution. The name comes from the auction's financial plan: 51 percent of the money from the sale of each piece goes to the artist, while the remaining 49 percent stays with the Luminary (2701 Cherokee Street; www.theluminaryarts.com). More than 50 pieces are up for grabs by artists such as Eric Wesley, Jason Lazarus, Kahlil Irving and Lyndon Barrois Jr. Potential bidders can opt for the VIP cocktail reception and auction preview ticket ($50), which includes complimentary wine and beer, chef-prepared food, the chance to mingle with the artists and the first crack at bidding from 7 to 8 p.m. The public event ($10) runs from 8 to 11 p.m. and features interactive bidding, DJ sets and artist-designed-cocktails. $10-50

The Luminary (map)
2701 Cherokee St
St. Louis - South City
phone 314-773-1533
Lot 49

Imagery of Chess: St. Louis Artists

Wednesdays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sundays, 12-5 p.m. and Mondays, Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 17

In 1944 Marcel Duchamp, Julien Levy and Max Ernst organized The Imagery of Chess, an exhibition of chess sets reimagined by artists and performers. Their hope was that people's vision of the chess board and pieces would be expanded beyond the then-accepted options of either the classic Staunton design or the "French" set. In 2016, the World Chess Hall of Fame exhibited some of the works from the 1944 show to acknowledge the debt owed to those artists for forever altering the look of chess. Imagery of Chess: St. Louis Artists is the new follow-up exhibit, which invites twenty local artists to have their way with the game pieces. Among those participating are Eugenia Alexander, who cites the Afrofuturism movement as a key influence on her work; fashion designer and Project Runway vet Michael Drummond; and Yuka Suga, a glass and metals artist who also works as a therapist. A second, simultaneous show, Pow! Capturing Superheroes, Chess & Comics, showcases more than 200 chess-themed comic books (you'd be surprised by how many super villains play chess to keep their minds sharp for optimal intricate scheming functionality). There are also superhero-themed chess boards and a comic book reading room. Both exhibitions open a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, March 23, at the World Chess Hall of Fame (4652 Maryland Avenue; www.worldchesshof.org). Imagery of Chess continues through September 14. Pow! remains up through September 17. Admission is a suggested $5 donation. $5 suggested donation

World Chess Hall of Fame (map)
4652 Maryland Ave
St. Louis - Central West End
phone 314-367-9243
Imagery of Chess: St. Louis Artists

Zorba

Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through March 25

Kander and Ebb's Zorba is a show that many critics feel hasn't aged well. It's important to keep in mind that critics are a sullen lot, and a musical that loudly and unashamedly declares that life is worth living because of the endless flow of joy and woe is perhaps too much for the mondo dismos of the press. Zorba is an older man who pursues women the same way he dances -- with lusty abandon -- and attaches himself to Nikos, a young man who comes to Crete to get the family's mine back in the black. Under Zorba's tutelage, Nikos learns to live for the moment, because the future is "a pig's behind," according to Zorba's philosophy. Together they chase women, sing, dance and enjoy the inevitable pain because it makes their too-brief joy that much sweeter. New Line Theatre presents Zorba at 8 p.m. Thursday to Saturday (March 2 to 25) at the Marcelle Theater (3310 Samuel Shepard Drive; www.newlinetheatre.com). Tickets are $10 to $25. $10-$25

Marcelle Theater (map)
3310 Samuel Shepard Dr
St. Louis - Grand Center Zorba

In the Realm of Trees

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3

Classical Chinese artists often used trees as inspirations or the focus of their works. Trees and the natural world are the focus of the new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), In the Realm of Trees, which includes photographs, paintings and decorative works that glorify the beauty found in nature. The centerpiece of the show is a set of contemporary photographs called Sacred Tree on Mount Lu, made by Beijing-based photographer Michael Cherney, which was acquired for the museum's permanent collection in 2016 and will be presented for the first time in this exhibit. In the Realm of Trees opens on Friday, March 10, and remains up through Sunday, September 3, in gallery 225. The gallery is open Tuesday through Sunday, and admission is free. free admission

Saint Louis Art Museum (map)
1 Fine Arts Dr
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-721-0072

Rosalyn Drexler: Who Does She Think She Is?

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through April 17

This full-career survey of playwright, novelist and visual artist Rosalyn Drexler offers a rare opportunity to see the breadth of the self-taught artist’s work. Her paintings feature bright colors and figures appropriated from films and print media, which she cropped, enlarged and printed on her canvases and then painted over them. The effect is somewhere between photo-realism, pop art and the visual language of a dream. Chubby Checker depicts a large Chubby mid-twist against squared fields of scarlet and blue and yellow, with couples dancing in 45-sized circles to the left; a smaller Checker echoes the larger one to the right. Love And Violence is far more sharp, a suited man looming over a crumpled blonde woman, grabbing her chin. A triptych of blue windows beneath the tableau show the same man helping to assault a fellow in a trench coat. free admission

Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form

Wednesdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through May 13

Italian sculptor Medardo Rosso was ahead of his time. Rather than creating heroic sculptures of figures from myth or doing a lucrative business in the monumental bronzes that were popular in the late nineteenth century, Rosso's sculptures seem to be caught emerging from bronze or wax. These almost-manifesting faces and forms are incredibly responsive to light, giving his work a fluid, ephemeral nature not often associated with sculpture. Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form, the new exhibition at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation (3716 Washington Boulevard; www.pulitzerarts.org), includes almost 100 examples of the artist's best work, including some of his photographs and drawings. Experiments in Light and Form opens with a free reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, November 11. The show continues through May 13, and the museum is open Wednesday through Saturday. Admission is free. free admission

Pulitzer Arts Foundation (map)
3716 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-754-1850
Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form

The Royale

Wednesdays-Fridays, 8 p.m., Sundays, 2 & 7 p.m. and Saturdays, 4 & 8 p.m. Continues through March 25

The scene is the early 1900s. Professional boxer Jay "The Sport" Jackson has a dream: to be the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world. Unfortunately, the times are not kind to a black athlete like Jackson, with racial segregation being the norm even in boxing. The Royale, written by Marco Ramirez and presented by the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, draws inspiration from the life of Jack Johnson, who became a boxing legend after defeating the undefeated James J. Jeffries in a match that was called "The Fight of the Century." This defeat was seen as a moment of advancement for African-Americans. Step up to the ring and stand by Jackson as he fights for both his title and his humanity. The Royale will be performed Tuesday through Sunday (March 10 to 26) at the Loretto-Hilton Center (130 Edgar Road; www.repstl.org). Tickets are $43.50 to $67.50. $43.50-$67.50

Degas, Impressionism, and the Paris Millinery Trade

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through May 7

Edgar Degas may be best known for his paintings and sculptures of dancers, but he was also fascinated by high-fashion hats and the young women who made them in the fashion capital of the world. This multimedia exhibition includes 60 paintings and pastels that depict high-fashion millinery, some by Degas and others by his contemporaries Manet, Renoir, Cassatt and Toulouse-Lautrec, who were all influenced by Degas’ work. More than 40 period hats will be on display as well, many of them by the acknowledged masters of Belle Epoque millinery, including Madame Georgette and Caroline Reboux. The exhibit is free on Fridays; admission is otherwise $6 to $15. $5-$6, free on Friday

Saint Louis Art Museum (map)
1 Fine Arts Dr
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-721-0072
Degas, Impressionism, and the Paris Millinery Trade

Motown the Musical

Through March 24, 7:30 p.m., Sat., March 25, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Sun., March 26, 1 & 6:30 p.m.

The story of Motown founder and songwriter Berry Gordy Jr. is one of determination and luck. He met singer Jackie Wilson through family friends, and sold him a song he'd written with the help of his sister and songwriter/producer Billy Davis. That modest hit led to more songs for Wilson and an eventual No. 1 hit. Gordy used his money to segue into producing, which is how he met Smokey Robinson. Before too long, he had a fledgling record company -- Motown Record Corporation, you may have heard of it -- and was well on his way toward chart domination, crossover success with a young white audience, and ascension to the top of the music business. Motown the Musical is based on Gordy's 1994 autobiography and uses more than 50 Motown classics to tell the story of Gordy's meteoric rise. Along the way it shines the spotlight on stars such as Diana Ross, the Four Tops, Marvin Gaye and Rick James. The jukebox musical is performed at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday through Friday, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 and 6:30 p.m. Sunday (March 21 to 26) at the Fox Theatre (527 North Grand Boulevard; www.fabulousfox.com). Tickets are $25 to $95. $25-$95

Buy Tickets
The Fox Theatre (map)
527 N. Grand Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-534-1111
Motown the Musical

Dispositive Environments

Fri., March 24, 6-8 p.m.
phone 314-246-7171
slateamb@webster.edu

Curated by Dr. Jeffrey Hughes, the exhibition Dispositive Environments will highlight the tension between technology and permanence, as well as the too often neglected ecological consequences of technology’s rapid expansion. Featured artists: Ursula Biemann Chris Jordan Eva Ju Libby Reuter & Joshua Rowan John Sabraw The Walter Collective Mel Watkin free

http://www.dadahwebsteru.com/

Selected Plays by Rosalyn Drexler: Utopia Parkway and Room 17C

Fri., March 24, 6-8 p.m.
phone 314-935-4523
ida.mccall@wustl.edu
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Students in the Performing Arts Department in Arts & Sciences, under the direction of Senior Lecturer Andrea Urice, perform dramatic readings of Utopia Parkway and Room 17C, two one-act plays by Rosalyn Drexler. During the past six decades, Drexler has won three Obies and authored a diverse range of plays that mingle the absurd and the vulgar, wit and humanity, evincing connections to figures as Samuel Beckett, Eugene Ionesco, and the Marx Brothers. This pair of plays first appeared in the production Transients Welcome, which earned Drexler an Obie Award in 1984. Free and open to the public. 0

http://www.kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu/events/performance/11737

Lot 49

Fri., March 24, 7-10 p.m.
Info@theluminaryarts.com
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The Luminary is pleased to announce our 2nd annual Lot 49 contemporary art auction + fundraiser on Friday, March 24th from 7pm to 10pm. Lot 49 is a unique artist-centric auction initiated and shaped by artists as an annual fundraiser for The Luminary and a direct means of support for artists in the region and beyond. The interactive auction will feature acclaimed artists nominated by their peers, with participating artists receiving 51% of all proceeds and the remaining 49% going to support our ambitious programs - hence the name, Lot 49. $50

https://www.facebook.com/events/715020925332265/?active_tab=about
Buy Tickets
The Luminary (map)
2701 Cherokee St
St. Louis - South City
phone 314-773-1533
Lot 49

Art Through All Eyes

Fri., March 24, 6-9 p.m., Sat., March 25, 12-3 p.m. and Sun., March 26, 12-3 p.m.
robert@bullivantgallery@gmail.com
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Join Bullivant Gallery and Delta Gamma Center for Children with Visual Impairments on March 24-26 for multi-sensory art exhibit to celebrate the difference ways people create, experience, and appreciate art and encourage exploration by all visitors, both sighted and visually impaired. Featuring Renowned Artist John Bramblitt After losing his sight in 2001, John Bramblitt has become the world’s number one blind painter with artwork sold in over thirty countries all over the world and featured in hundreds of stories on TV, Radio and newspapers including: The New York Times, The Washington Post, BBC, Discovery Channel, and CNN.

http://www.bullivantgallery.com/?page_id=1649
Bullivant Gallery (map)
3321 Washington Blvd
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-865-0077
Art Through All Eyes

Harlem Renaissance: Contemporary Response

Fri., March 24, 6-7:30 p.m. and Sun., May 14

Harlem Renaissance: Contemporary Response is a juried and invitational visual art exhibition featuring works by Emerging or Young Artists inspired by artists associated with the Harlem Renaissance (1918-1937), a theme that will also be explored through the performing arts in COCA’s production of Uptown in Founders’ Theatre April 7-9, 2017. Visual artists such as Jacob Lawrence, Romare Bearden, Henry Ossawa Tanner, Archibald J. Motley, Aaron Douglass, and Gordon Parks as well as the literature, music, and dance of the time provide the inspiration. All explorations and interpretations of the theme are invited. Please join us Friday, March 24, 6-7:30PM for an opening reception.

http://www.cocastl.org/event/spring-exhibition/
Center of Creative Arts (COCA) (map)
524 Trinity Ave.
Delmar/ The Loop
phone 314-725-6555
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