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PAW Patrol Live!

Sat., May 27, 10-11:30 a.m., 2-3:30 & 6-7:30 p.m.

Based on the hit animated TV series on Nickelodeon, PAW Patrol Live! “Race to the Rescue” brings everybody’s favorite pups to the stage for an action-packed, high-energy, musical adventure. Join Ryder, Chase, Marshall, Rocky, Rubble, Zuma, Skye and Everest when they take the stage at Peabody Opera House in St. Louis on Friday, May 26 and Saturday, May 27, 2017. Tickets for all five will be available for purchase at the Scottrade Center Box Office, online at www.ticketmaster.com or by phone at 800-745-3000. $21.00 - $123.00

http://www.pawpatrollive.com
Buy from Ticketmaster
Peabody Opera House (map)
1400 Market St
St. Louis - Downtown
phone 314-241-1888
PAW Patrol Live!

The Grapes of Wrath

Sat., May 27, 8 p.m., Wed., May 31, 8 p.m., Fri., June 9, 8 p.m., Thu., June 15, 8 p.m., Sat., June 17, 1 p.m., Wed., June 21, 1 p.m. and Sun., June 25, 7 p.m.

The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck's novel of the Great Depression, follows the Joad family across America as they pursue a better life. Chased out of Oklahoma by the Dust Bowl, the Joads head for California to try their luck as migrant fruit pickers. Once there, they discover they're a drain on the local labor force, pawns for the wealthy and subhumans to everyone else. Their only crime is poverty, yet the denizens of the promised land are determined to keep them suffering from it. Ricky Ian Gordon and Michael Korie adapted Steinbeck's morality play for opera audiences in 2007, and this year present the premiere of their new performing version at Opera Theatre of St. Louis. The Grapes of Wrath is performed at 8 p.m. Saturday, May 27, at the Loretto-Hilton Center (130 Edgar Road; www.opera-stl.org). Tickets are $25 to $129. The opera is performed six more times in repertory through June 25. $25-$129

First Impressions

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through May 27

Pride and Prejudice remains immensely popular more than 200 years after its release thanks to Jane Austen's ability to translate to the page the love, longing and hasty decision-making of young women. For the final production of Slightly Askew Theatre Ensemble's tenth season, the company presents First Impressions, an interesting take on Austen's novel. Inspired by Elizabeth Bennet's reliance on first impressions, Ellie Schwetye and Rachel Tibbetts polled people via social media about their first impressions of the novel. These gathered recollections are woven into the story as a way of celebrating the novel's perpetual pull on readers' hearts and minds. First Impressions is presented at 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday (May 17 to 27) at the Chapel (6238 Alexander Drive; www.slightlyoff.org). Tickets are $15 to $20. $15-$20

The Chapel (map)
6238 Alexander Drive
Clayton First Impressions

4000 Miles

Saturdays, 8 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m. Continues through May 28

Leo didn't intend to end up at his grandmother Vera's apartment in Manhattans West Village, and she certainly wasn't expecting him -- especially not in the middle of the night. But at 91, she's learned a great deal about life, and she can tell something is wrong with her grandson. Something terrible happened during his cross-country bicycle journey, that's for certain. Vera doesn't mind his company; things have been awfully quiet in her life since her husband passed away. Leo's sudden appearance might turn out to be just what both of them need at this point in their lives. Amy Herzog's intimate play 4000 Miles is about the distance between age 21 and age 91, and how small it really is. The New Jewish Theatre closes its season with 4000 Miles. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, 8 p.m. Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday (May 11 to 28) in the Wool Studio at the Jewish Community Center (2 Millstone Campus Drive, Creve Coeur; www.newjewishtheatre.org). Tickets are $39.50 to $43.50. $39.50-$43.50

The Hats of Stephen Jones

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3
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You may not recognize Stephen Jones by name, but you've most likely seen his work. The English milliner's creations have been worn by trend-setting celebrities for more than 30 years, from Princess Diana to Lady Gaga. A selection of eight of his avant-garde hats are displayed at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org) in Hats of Stephen Jones, a complementary exhibition to the ongoing exhibition Degas, Impressionism, and the Paris Millinery Trade. Jones' exhibit will remain up from Friday, April 21 to Sunday, September 3. At 2 p.m. Sunday, April 23, Jones visits the museum to discuss his work and his inspirations with New York milliner Jennifer Ouellette. Admission to the lecture is $20 to $25; exhibition admission is $6 to $15. $6-$15

In the Realm of Trees

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3

Classical Chinese artists often used trees as inspirations or the focus of their works. Trees and the natural world are the focus of the new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), In the Realm of Trees, which includes photographs, paintings and decorative works that glorify the beauty found in nature. The centerpiece of the show is a set of contemporary photographs called Sacred Tree on Mount Lu, made by Beijing-based photographer Michael Cherney, which was acquired for the museum's permanent collection in 2016 and will be presented for the first time in this exhibit. In the Realm of Trees opens on Friday, March 10, and remains up through Sunday, September 3, in gallery 225. The gallery is open Tuesday through Sunday, and admission is free. free admission

Learning to See: Renaissance and Baroque Masterworks

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through July 30

Phoebe Dent Weil created the field of sculpture conservation in the early 1970s right here in St. Louis. As you might imagine, her personal collection of art is deep and full of treasures. Her husband Mark Weil was an art historian, and his collection is also heavy with the hits of the Baroque and Renaissance. They have promised their joint art holding to the Saint Louis Art Museum, where the public will be able to enjoy for years to come the fruits of their very fruitful collecting years. Learning to See: Renaissance Baroque Masterworks from the Phoebe Dent Weil and Mark S. Weil Collection features etchings by Rembrandt van Rijn and Albrecht Dürer and sixteenth-century Italian terracotta sculptures and busts, each work a miracle of craftsmanship and artistic vision. free admission

Jennifer Colten: Higher Ground

Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m., Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and Tuesdays, 12-8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 26

Back in the old days, the insanities of racism and segregation kept black people and white people out of the same graveyards. Washington Park Cemetery was for many years the largest final resting place for black St. Louis. Its proximity to Lambert St. Louis International Airport doomed it, however. Highway 70 ran through the middle of the cemetery in the 1950s, and more bodies were moved in the '90s when MetroLink tracks were laid and the airport expanded. Photographer Jennifer Colten documented the current state of the cemetery for the new multimedia exhibition Higher Ground: Honoring Washington Park Cemetery, Its People and Place. Her large-scale, color photographs are supported by historical documentation, video and oral histories (by Denise Ward-Brown) and an art installation by Dail Chambers, all toward the goal of illuminating the racial politics and tangled history behind a black cemetery’s sacrifice in the name of progress. free admission

Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900
Jennifer Colten:  Higher Ground

Tennessee Williams: The Playwright and the Painter

Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through July 23

In addition to his work as a playwright, Tennessee Williams painted. The subject of his expressionist paintings varies; often he painted close friends, but some of his creations reference scenes from his plays, or reveal his personal feelings. David Wolkowsky, a close friend of Williams, has graciously loaned seventeen paintings from his personal collection to the Saint Louis University Museum of Art as part of this year's Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis. This is only the second time they’ve been exhibited outside of Key West, so fans should take advantage of this rare viewing. The show is supplemented by an audio recording of Williams reading his poetry and a short video of Wolkowsky discussing his friend. free admission

Erica Iman: Formation

Wednesdays, Saturdays, 1-4 p.m. Continues through May 31

The steppes of Mongolia are an austere landscape broken by mountains and the encroaching Gobi desert. The starkness of the region reshaped ceramicist Erica Iman's work during her stint in the Peace Corps. Her functional, hand-built vessels mimic the primordial nature of Mongolia's open terrain, appearing more as geological eruptions of rock and hard-packed soil with their raw edges and weathered finishes. Erica Iman: Formation, the new exhibit at the Reese Gallery (3410 Wisconsin Avenue; www.thereesegallery.com), offers a selection of Iman's recent work. The show opens with a free reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, April 28. The gallery is open from 1 to 4 p.m. on Wednesday and Saturday, and Formation remains up through Wednesday, May 31. Admission is free. free admission

Urban Planning: Art and the City 1967-2017

Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 13

Agnes Denes' photograph Wheatfield -- A Confrontation: Battery Park Landfill, Downtown Manhattan is one of the more incongruous images you're likely to see. The artist stands holding a staff in a hip-deep golden field of wheat; rising up from the other side of the street is a battalion of skyscrapers. You don't think of Manhattan as agriculturally active, but wheat grew wild near the landfill in 1982. The image is part of the Contemporary's summer exhibition, Urban Planning: Art and the City 1967-2017, which takes a contemplative approach to documenting the ebb and flow of city life. Urban Planning comprises photographs, sculptures and installations that address gentrification, white flight and the decay that follows -- and the occasional rebirth of a city. free admission

Crossin' Over

Sundays, 2 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. and Thursdays, 7 p.m. Continues through June 18

Ron Himes and Charles Creath first debuted their musical revue Crossin' Over in 2005, when we were fighting a war on terror and our civic freedoms were being restrained in the name of public safety. Twelve years later the show returns to a changed America, one that's seen the gains in liberty and equality achieved under our first black president under assault from yet another power-mad dum-dum. Crossin' Over charts the path of the African diaspora, from the middle passage to the civil rights movement. The show incorporates the entire trajectory of black spiritual music, from traditional West African drumming to church hymns and gospel standards, right up to the contemporary gospel of the moment. Throughout, the music runs the constant refrain of survival and resistance -- we shall overcome, no matter the odds. Crossin' Over is performed at 7 p.m. Thursday, 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday (May 26 to June 18) in the Emerson Performance Center at Harris-Stowe State University (3026 Laclede Avenue; www.theblackrep.org). Tickets are $10 to $40. $10-$40

A Human Being Died that Night

Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. and Sun., May 28, 2 p.m. Continues through May 27

Eugene de Kock is a nightmare figure in the history of South Africa. The commanding officer of the notorious C10 police squad, de Kock was personally responsible for the torture and murder of numerous anti-apartheid activists, including members of the African National Congress. He admitted all this freely in court after apartheid was abolished and a new government was established, and was sentenced to 212 years in prison for his crimes. Psychologist Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela interviewed de Kock several times, trying to understand how a man who thought of himself as moral could so brutally and callously treat other human beings. Nicholas Wright adapted Gobodo-Madikizela's book about de Kock and other killers into the two-person play A Human Being Died That Night. Upstream Theater presents the chilling work at 8 p.m. Thursday to Saturday (May 12 to 27), 7 p.m. Sunday (May 14 and 21) and 2 p.m. Sunday, May 28, at the Kranzberg Arts Center (501 North Grand Boulevard; www.upstreamtheater.org). Tickets are $25 to $30. $25-$30

Buy Tickets
Kranzberg Arts Center (map)
501 N Grand Blvd
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-0367
A Human Being Died that Night

Shimon Attie: Lost in Space (After Huck)

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through June 25

American artist Shimon Attie is interested in making people aware of the historical import of public spaces that appear common. In New York he projected the written memories of long-time residents of Manhattan's Lower East Side onto former tenement buildings. For Portraits of Exile, his exhibition in Copenhagen, he submerged light boxes in a canal so that the portraits of Jewish refugees whom the government shipped to safety during World War II would remind Denmark of its heroic actions to save refugees in need, and underline the current administration's malign ambivalence to refugees. Lost in Space (After Huck), his new installation for the Saint Louis Art Museum, uses sculpture, video and audio to evoke the memories of St. Louis mytho-poetic past. A cast epoxy resin raft is the center of the piece; a corn-cob pipe, an oar and a bindle wait for their absent owners in the menacing glow of a police light. Digitally projected constellations of light appear and then wink out in the darkness surrounding the raft, while streaks of lighting race through the artificial night. free admission

Diego and Frida: A Smile in the Middle of the Way

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 4

Diego Rivera became a legend in his native Mexico for his vibrant murals. Perhaps unfortunately for him, his enshrinement happened early in his life; it's difficult to be a man and a legend at the same time. Frida Kahlo chose to become a painter only after a serious car crash derailed her dream of being a doctor. Her self-portraits are revered for their depiction of the feminine experience, and they are informed both by her continuing physical pain and the emotional turmoil of her marriage to Rivera, whom she eventually divorced and then remarried. They made a vicarious, creative and combative couple, and were often photographed together and separately by friends and family. Diego and Frida: A Smile in the Middle of the Way, the new exhibit at the International Photography Hall of Fame and Museum (3415 Olive Boulevard; www.iphf.org), showcases a large collection of formal and informal photographs of the pair. Included in the exhibit are pictures captured by Guillermo Kahlo (Frida's father), Ansel Adams, muralist Lucienne Bloch, who photographed much of Rivera and Kahlo's work, and prolific Mexican photographer Agustin Victor Casasola. Diego and Frida is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday (Saturday, May 13, to Friday, August 4). Admission is $3 to $5. $5

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