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Audubon and Beyond

Mondays-Thursdays, 7:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Continues through June 15
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Among those of the ornithological persuasion, the St. Louis region is of prime interest because of our natural flyways. The Mississippi River underwrites that status; it's a superhighway for migrating birds. We have another feathered fact to boast about: While the renowned birdman John James Audubon was still alive, the St. Louis Mercantile Library acquired a rare reserved copy of his masterwork, Birds of America, from his family. This is tantamount to owning a Gutenberg Bible. Celebrate it with the exhibit Audubon and Beyond: Collecting Five Centuries of Natural History at the St. Louis Mercantile Library on the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus (1 University Drive at Natural Bridge Road; 314-516-7240 or www.umsl.edu/mercantile). The extensive exhibit incorporates sections relating to not only birds but also reptiles, mammals, fish, insects, humans, astronomy, geology, meteorology and more. Audubon and Beyond is open 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and noon to 8 p.m. Sunday (November 9 through June 2017). Admission is free. free admission

University of Missouri-St. Louis-Mercantile Library (map)
1 University Dr. at Natural Bridge Road
North St. Louis County
phone 314-516-7240
Audubon and Beyond

Imagery of Chess: St. Louis Artists

Wednesdays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sundays, 12-5 p.m. and Mondays, Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 17

In 1944 Marcel Duchamp, Julien Levy and Max Ernst organized The Imagery of Chess, an exhibition of chess sets reimagined by artists and performers. Their hope was that people's vision of the chess board and pieces would be expanded beyond the then-accepted options of either the classic Staunton design or the "French" set. In 2016, the World Chess Hall of Fame exhibited some of the works from the 1944 show to acknowledge the debt owed to those artists for forever altering the look of chess. Imagery of Chess: St. Louis Artists is the new follow-up exhibit, which invites twenty local artists to have their way with the game pieces. Among those participating are Eugenia Alexander, who cites the Afrofuturism movement as a key influence on her work; fashion designer and Project Runway vet Michael Drummond; and Yuka Suga, a glass and metals artist who also works as a therapist. A second, simultaneous show, Pow! Capturing Superheroes, Chess & Comics, showcases more than 200 chess-themed comic books (you'd be surprised by how many super villains play chess to keep their minds sharp for optimal intricate scheming functionality). There are also superhero-themed chess boards and a comic book reading room. Both exhibitions open a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, March 23, at the World Chess Hall of Fame (4652 Maryland Avenue; www.worldchesshof.org). Imagery of Chess continues through September 14. Pow! remains up through September 17. Admission is a suggested $5 donation. $5 suggested donation

The Hats of Stephen Jones

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3
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You may not recognize Stephen Jones by name, but you've most likely seen his work. The English milliner's creations have been worn by trend-setting celebrities for more than 30 years, from Princess Diana to Lady Gaga. A selection of eight of his avant-garde hats are displayed at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org) in Hats of Stephen Jones, a complementary exhibition to the ongoing exhibition Degas, Impressionism, and the Paris Millinery Trade. Jones' exhibit will remain up from Friday, April 21 to Sunday, September 3. At 2 p.m. Sunday, April 23, Jones visits the museum to discuss his work and his inspirations with New York milliner Jennifer Ouellette. Admission to the lecture is $20 to $25; exhibition admission is $6 to $15. $6-$15

In the Realm of Trees

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3

Classical Chinese artists often used trees as inspirations or the focus of their works. Trees and the natural world are the focus of the new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), In the Realm of Trees, which includes photographs, paintings and decorative works that glorify the beauty found in nature. The centerpiece of the show is a set of contemporary photographs called Sacred Tree on Mount Lu, made by Beijing-based photographer Michael Cherney, which was acquired for the museum's permanent collection in 2016 and will be presented for the first time in this exhibit. In the Realm of Trees opens on Friday, March 10, and remains up through Sunday, September 3, in gallery 225. The gallery is open Tuesday through Sunday, and admission is free. free admission

Learning to See: Renaissance and Baroque Masterworks

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through July 30

Phoebe Dent Weil created the field of sculpture conservation in the early 1970s right here in St. Louis. As you might imagine, her personal collection of art is deep and full of treasures. Her husband Mark Weil was an art historian, and his collection is also heavy with the hits of the Baroque and Renaissance. They have promised their joint art holding to the Saint Louis Art Museum, where the public will be able to enjoy for years to come the fruits of their very fruitful collecting years. Learning to See: Renaissance Baroque Masterworks from the Phoebe Dent Weil and Mark S. Weil Collection features etchings by Rembrandt van Rijn and Albrecht Dürer and sixteenth-century Italian terracotta sculptures and busts, each work a miracle of craftsmanship and artistic vision. free admission

Jennifer Colten: Higher Ground

Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m., Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and Tuesdays, 12-8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 26

Back in the old days, the insanities of racism and segregation kept black people and white people out of the same graveyards. Washington Park Cemetery was for many years the largest final resting place for black St. Louis. Its proximity to Lambert St. Louis International Airport doomed it, however. Highway 70 ran through the middle of the cemetery in the 1950s, and more bodies were moved in the '90s when MetroLink tracks were laid and the airport expanded. Photographer Jennifer Colten documented the current state of the cemetery for the new multimedia exhibition Higher Ground: Honoring Washington Park Cemetery, Its People and Place. Her large-scale, color photographs are supported by historical documentation, video and oral histories (by Denise Ward-Brown) and an art installation by Dail Chambers, all toward the goal of illuminating the racial politics and tangled history behind a black cemetery’s sacrifice in the name of progress. free admission

Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900
Jennifer Colten:  Higher Ground

Shimon Attie: Lost in Space (After Huck)

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through June 25

American artist Shimon Attie is interested in making people aware of the historical import of public spaces that appear common. In New York he projected the written memories of long-time residents of Manhattan's Lower East Side onto former tenement buildings. For Portraits of Exile, his exhibition in Copenhagen, he submerged light boxes in a canal so that the portraits of Jewish refugees whom the government shipped to safety during World War II would remind Denmark of its heroic actions to save refugees in need, and underline the current administration's malign ambivalence to refugees. Lost in Space (After Huck), his new installation for the Saint Louis Art Museum, uses sculpture, video and audio to evoke the memories of St. Louis mytho-poetic past. A cast epoxy resin raft is the center of the piece; a corn-cob pipe, an oar and a bindle wait for their absent owners in the menacing glow of a police light. Digitally projected constellations of light appear and then wink out in the darkness surrounding the raft, while streaks of lighting race through the artificial night. free admission

Cinema at Citygarden

Through June 30, 5-10 p.m.
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It's been a little while since this town has hosted a film festival, but just like that, Cinema St. Louis and Gateway Foundation plug the gap with Cinema at Citygarden. The biennial program invites filmmakers to create new works on a single theme to enter in a juried competition. This year's theme is Nature, and the winning entrants are David Rocco ("Summer Louis"), Natalie Rainer ("Hypervide") and Yihuang Lu ("Ocean Breathes"). Their films, along with entries from Zlatko Cosic, Yuhan Zhang and Cole Hieronymus, and a handful of other filmmakers, will screen from 5 to 10 p.m. daily (Friday, May 26 to Friday, June 30) on Citygarden's video wall (801 Market Street; www.citygardenstl.org). Admission is free. free admission

Citygarden (map)
801 Market St
St. Louis - Downtown
phone 314-241-3337
Cinema at Citygarden

Glenda Hares: Color Play

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Continues through June 30
phone 314-645-4040
Info@NortonsFineArt.com

@ Norton's Fine Art & Framing, 2025 S Big Bend Blvd 63117
New acrylic paintings and collages by popular St Louis artist Glenda Hares, featuring landscapes, still-lifes and florals. This exhibit and sale starts on Saturday, May 6th with our wine & cheese artist reception from 6pm – 8pm. It continues through June 30th. The exhibit is free and open to the public. free

http://nortonsfineart.com/events/
Norton's Fine Art & Framing (map)
2025 S. Big Bend Blvd.
Richmond Heights
phone 314-645-4040
Glenda Hares: Color Play

Garden of Glass

Through Aug. 13, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

The Missouri Botanical Garden (4344 Shaw Boulevard; www.mobot.org) continues its tradition of summer exhibitions this year with the flora-inspired Garden of Glass. Comprising 30 works of fused glass created by Craig Mitchell Smith, the exhibit features larger-than-life replicas of orange blossoms, orchids, dandelions and other flowers that are installed throughout the Climatron. Viewings of Garden of Glass are available from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily (May 13 to August 13). Admission is $4 to $17, and that includes regular garden admission. Evening hours for the Climatron only start Thursday, May 25, and last from 7 to 11 p.m. Thursday through Sunday through August 12. Evening admission is $6 to $16. $4-$17

Drawing from the Collection: 40 Years at Laumeier

Through July 16, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Forty years ago, Laumeier Sculpture Park was just a 72-acre plot gifted to the county and a dream. Today it's home to 60 large-scale, outdoor works of art that each began as a dream in the mind of an artist. How does one begin to puzzle out what the three dimensions should be for Jonathan Borofsky's 24-foot-tall fiberglass man with a briefcase, or one of Andy Goldsworthy's earthworks? Many of the sculptures started as rough drafts in two dimensions, as drawings, photographs or collages. Drawing from the Collection: 40 Years at Laumeier presents a collection of these works in progress. It's both a celebration of four decades of the park's history and of the creative spirit that continues to drive Laumeier into the future.

NOLA Swing Night

Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-12 a.m.
phone 504-344-6946
oliviabrinich@gmail.com
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NOLA Swing Night is a New Orleans style swing dance night Tuesdays from 8 PM to 12 AM hosted by HandleBar STL and organized by Olivia Red. Join us for a free swing dance lesson at 8 PM and music from 8:30 PM - 12:00 AM! Every Tuesday at HandleBar is Happy Hour all day with $1 off drafts, 1$ off cocktails, and weekly New Orleans style drink specials. No cover

https://www.facebook.com/nolaswingnight/
HandleBar (map)
4127 Manchester Ave.
St. Louis - The Grove
phone 314-652-2212
NOLA Swing Night
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