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First Impressions

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through May 27

Pride and Prejudice remains immensely popular more than 200 years after its release thanks to Jane Austen's ability to translate to the page the love, longing and hasty decision-making of young women. For the final production of Slightly Askew Theatre Ensemble's tenth season, the company presents First Impressions, an interesting take on Austen's novel. Inspired by Elizabeth Bennet's reliance on first impressions, Ellie Schwetye and Rachel Tibbetts polled people via social media about their first impressions of the novel. These gathered recollections are woven into the story as a way of celebrating the novel's perpetual pull on readers' hearts and minds. First Impressions is presented at 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday (May 17 to 27) at the Chapel (6238 Alexander Drive; www.slightlyoff.org). Tickets are $15 to $20. $15-$20

The Chapel (map)
6238 Alexander Drive
Clayton First Impressions

Imagery of Chess: St. Louis Artists

Wednesdays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sundays, 12-5 p.m. and Mondays, Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 17

In 1944 Marcel Duchamp, Julien Levy and Max Ernst organized The Imagery of Chess, an exhibition of chess sets reimagined by artists and performers. Their hope was that people's vision of the chess board and pieces would be expanded beyond the then-accepted options of either the classic Staunton design or the "French" set. In 2016, the World Chess Hall of Fame exhibited some of the works from the 1944 show to acknowledge the debt owed to those artists for forever altering the look of chess. Imagery of Chess: St. Louis Artists is the new follow-up exhibit, which invites twenty local artists to have their way with the game pieces. Among those participating are Eugenia Alexander, who cites the Afrofuturism movement as a key influence on her work; fashion designer and Project Runway vet Michael Drummond; and Yuka Suga, a glass and metals artist who also works as a therapist. A second, simultaneous show, Pow! Capturing Superheroes, Chess & Comics, showcases more than 200 chess-themed comic books (you'd be surprised by how many super villains play chess to keep their minds sharp for optimal intricate scheming functionality). There are also superhero-themed chess boards and a comic book reading room. Both exhibitions open a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, March 23, at the World Chess Hall of Fame (4652 Maryland Avenue; www.worldchesshof.org). Imagery of Chess continues through September 14. Pow! remains up through September 17. Admission is a suggested $5 donation. $5 suggested donation

The Hats of Stephen Jones

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3
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You may not recognize Stephen Jones by name, but you've most likely seen his work. The English milliner's creations have been worn by trend-setting celebrities for more than 30 years, from Princess Diana to Lady Gaga. A selection of eight of his avant-garde hats are displayed at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org) in Hats of Stephen Jones, a complementary exhibition to the ongoing exhibition Degas, Impressionism, and the Paris Millinery Trade. Jones' exhibit will remain up from Friday, April 21 to Sunday, September 3. At 2 p.m. Sunday, April 23, Jones visits the museum to discuss his work and his inspirations with New York milliner Jennifer Ouellette. Admission to the lecture is $20 to $25; exhibition admission is $6 to $15. $6-$15

In the Realm of Trees

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3

Classical Chinese artists often used trees as inspirations or the focus of their works. Trees and the natural world are the focus of the new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), In the Realm of Trees, which includes photographs, paintings and decorative works that glorify the beauty found in nature. The centerpiece of the show is a set of contemporary photographs called Sacred Tree on Mount Lu, made by Beijing-based photographer Michael Cherney, which was acquired for the museum's permanent collection in 2016 and will be presented for the first time in this exhibit. In the Realm of Trees opens on Friday, March 10, and remains up through Sunday, September 3, in gallery 225. The gallery is open Tuesday through Sunday, and admission is free. free admission

Learning to See: Renaissance and Baroque Masterworks

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through July 30

Phoebe Dent Weil created the field of sculpture conservation in the early 1970s right here in St. Louis. As you might imagine, her personal collection of art is deep and full of treasures. Her husband Mark Weil was an art historian, and his collection is also heavy with the hits of the Baroque and Renaissance. They have promised their joint art holding to the Saint Louis Art Museum, where the public will be able to enjoy for years to come the fruits of their very fruitful collecting years. Learning to See: Renaissance Baroque Masterworks from the Phoebe Dent Weil and Mark S. Weil Collection features etchings by Rembrandt van Rijn and Albrecht Dürer and sixteenth-century Italian terracotta sculptures and busts, each work a miracle of craftsmanship and artistic vision. free admission

Jennifer Colten: Higher Ground

Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m., Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and Tuesdays, 12-8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 26

Back in the old days, the insanities of racism and segregation kept black people and white people out of the same graveyards. Washington Park Cemetery was for many years the largest final resting place for black St. Louis. Its proximity to Lambert St. Louis International Airport doomed it, however. Highway 70 ran through the middle of the cemetery in the 1950s, and more bodies were moved in the '90s when MetroLink tracks were laid and the airport expanded. Photographer Jennifer Colten documented the current state of the cemetery for the new multimedia exhibition Higher Ground: Honoring Washington Park Cemetery, Its People and Place. Her large-scale, color photographs are supported by historical documentation, video and oral histories (by Denise Ward-Brown) and an art installation by Dail Chambers, all toward the goal of illuminating the racial politics and tangled history behind a black cemetery’s sacrifice in the name of progress. free admission

Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900
Jennifer Colten:  Higher Ground

Tennessee Williams: The Playwright and the Painter

Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through July 23

In addition to his work as a playwright, Tennessee Williams painted. The subject of his expressionist paintings varies; often he painted close friends, but some of his creations reference scenes from his plays, or reveal his personal feelings. David Wolkowsky, a close friend of Williams, has graciously loaned seventeen paintings from his personal collection to the Saint Louis University Museum of Art as part of this year's Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis. This is only the second time they’ve been exhibited outside of Key West, so fans should take advantage of this rare viewing. The show is supplemented by an audio recording of Williams reading his poetry and a short video of Wolkowsky discussing his friend. free admission

Urban Planning: Art and the City 1967-2017

Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 13

Agnes Denes' photograph Wheatfield -- A Confrontation: Battery Park Landfill, Downtown Manhattan is one of the more incongruous images you're likely to see. The artist stands holding a staff in a hip-deep golden field of wheat; rising up from the other side of the street is a battalion of skyscrapers. You don't think of Manhattan as agriculturally active, but wheat grew wild near the landfill in 1982. The image is part of the Contemporary's summer exhibition, Urban Planning: Art and the City 1967-2017, which takes a contemplative approach to documenting the ebb and flow of city life. Urban Planning comprises photographs, sculptures and installations that address gentrification, white flight and the decay that follows -- and the occasional rebirth of a city. free admission

Shimon Attie: Lost in Space (After Huck)

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through June 25

American artist Shimon Attie is interested in making people aware of the historical import of public spaces that appear common. In New York he projected the written memories of long-time residents of Manhattan's Lower East Side onto former tenement buildings. For Portraits of Exile, his exhibition in Copenhagen, he submerged light boxes in a canal so that the portraits of Jewish refugees whom the government shipped to safety during World War II would remind Denmark of its heroic actions to save refugees in need, and underline the current administration's malign ambivalence to refugees. Lost in Space (After Huck), his new installation for the Saint Louis Art Museum, uses sculpture, video and audio to evoke the memories of St. Louis mytho-poetic past. A cast epoxy resin raft is the center of the piece; a corn-cob pipe, an oar and a bindle wait for their absent owners in the menacing glow of a police light. Digitally projected constellations of light appear and then wink out in the darkness surrounding the raft, while streaks of lighting race through the artificial night. free admission

Diego and Frida: A Smile in the Middle of the Way

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 4

Diego Rivera became a legend in his native Mexico for his vibrant murals. Perhaps unfortunately for him, his enshrinement happened early in his life; it's difficult to be a man and a legend at the same time. Frida Kahlo chose to become a painter only after a serious car crash derailed her dream of being a doctor. Her self-portraits are revered for their depiction of the feminine experience, and they are informed both by her continuing physical pain and the emotional turmoil of her marriage to Rivera, whom she eventually divorced and then remarried. They made a vicarious, creative and combative couple, and were often photographed together and separately by friends and family. Diego and Frida: A Smile in the Middle of the Way, the new exhibit at the International Photography Hall of Fame and Museum (3415 Olive Boulevard; www.iphf.org), showcases a large collection of formal and informal photographs of the pair. Included in the exhibit are pictures captured by Guillermo Kahlo (Frida's father), Ansel Adams, muralist Lucienne Bloch, who photographed much of Rivera and Kahlo's work, and prolific Mexican photographer Agustin Victor Casasola. Diego and Frida is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday (Saturday, May 13, to Friday, August 4). Admission is $3 to $5. $5

Black Dance - USA

Thu., May 25, 9 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri., May 26, 9 a.m.-10 p.m. and Sat., May 27, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
phone 314-367-3440 ext. 103
blackanceusa@betterfamilylife.org
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@ Better Family Life, Inc., 5415 Page Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63112
Black Dance - USA is an incredibly energetic, educational and high spirited national dance festival that consists of dance workshops in traditional West Afrikan (Mali, Gambia, Senegal and Guinea), Afro Cuban and Salsa (ritual and social), African Caribbean, Hip-Hop, the Original Buckshop, and Kemetic yoga, as well as Djembe percussion, all taught by some of the world’s best choreographers, dancers, and instructors.

http://blackdanceusa.com
Buy Tickets
Better Family Life (map)
5415 Page Blvd
St. Louis - North City
phone 314-367-3440
Black Dance - USA

Floral and Botanical Art Show

Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 28
phone 314-402-1959
greendoorartgallery@aol.com
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Green Door art gallery presents “Florals and Botanicals" Reception Friday, May 12, 2017 from 5-9 pm featuring Susan Greene’s paintings, Confluence Gallery winners from their online Floral and Botanical juried show, abstract imagery paintings of Jane Miles, paintings by Dimitrina Kutriansky and jewelry by Julie Bell, Ellen Klamon and Pam Bohling, plus artwork by 30 other artists-Artwork available from May 10 until June 28, 2017. Located at 21 N. Gore, Webster Groves MO 63119 near St. Louis 314-402-1959 www.GreenDoorartgallery.com/events. free

http://www.greendoorartgallery.com
Green Door Art Gallery (map)
21 N. Gore Ave.
Webster Groves
phone 314-402-1959
Floral and Botanical Art Show

Bunny Burson: And Still I Rise

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 3
info@brunodavidgallery.com
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Bunny Burson will create an installation of swirling shards of the actual confetti, which had been loaded into air cannons and were to have fallen from the glass ceiling at the Javits Center had Hillary Clinton become President on November 8, 2016. Opening reception from 5 to 9 p.m. Thursday, May 4. This exhibition can be seen 24/7 from the window on Forsyth Boulevard and will be on view through July 22, 2017. Free

http://www.brunodavidgallery.com/index.cfm
Bruno David Gallery (map)
7513 Forsyth Blvd.
Clayton
phone 314-696-2377
Bunny Burson: And Still I Rise

Judy Child: Revelations

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 3
info@brunodavidgallery.com
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As a painter, Judy Child, has always been fascinated by how versatile paint can be. This new series of paintings explores that versatility. She left behind brushes, palette knives and, most importantly, color. By stripping away color and narrative, she focuses on the natural beauty of serendipitous and complex configurations of the paint. The physical act of pouring and manipulating the paint plus the effects of gravity and the drying process determine the outcome of her paintings. Opening reception from 5 to 9 p.m. Thursday, May 4. Free

http://www.brunodavidgallery.com/index.cfm
Bruno David Gallery (map)
7513 Forsyth Blvd.
Clayton
phone 314-696-2377
Judy Child: Revelations

Kelley Johnson: Somewhere Between Here and There

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 3
info@brunodavidgallery.com
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Kelley Johnson continues in his interest in a painting’s ability to create optical space while at the same time interacting with the viewer as an object. Johnson thinks of the new work as installations that talk about the possibilities and limitations of painting along with the viewers role as participant. Using external elements such as lines or patterns that move through the picture plane onto the floors and or walls of the gallery, he creates interactions between internal and external spaces that function as a kind interactive painting. Opening reception from 5 to 9 p.m. Thursday, May 4. Free

http://http://www.brunodavidgallery.com/index.cfm
Bruno David Gallery (map)
7513 Forsyth Blvd.
Clayton
phone 314-696-2377
Kelley Johnson: Somewhere Between Here and There
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