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St. Louis Blues vs. Arizona Coyotes

Mon., March 27, 7 p.m.

Who are the 2017 St. Louis Blues? The team has been doing its best roller coaster imitation with a long winning streak followed by a long losing streak -- and then, just to mix things up, another solid winning streak. Management traded away a top defenseman (Kevin Shattenkirk) during that streak of streaks, so it feels like the Blues aren't championship contenders this year. But maybe they’re still playoff contenders? Recent wins against the Minnesota Wild and the Los Angeles Kings have shown there's still fight left in this team. Maybe the Blues can bang into the post-season and then play spoiler. Don't underestimate the power of schadenfreude -- ruining the Blackhawks' season is always a pleasure. Tonight at 7 p.m. the Blues take on the Arizona Coyotes, who are hanging out near the bottom of the standings once again, at Scottrade Center (1401 Clark Avenue; www.stlblues.com). The Coyotes have nothing to play for but pride, so expect a tight-checking game (that spoiler role is also an option near the end of the regular season for some teams). Tickets are $20 to $319. $20-$319

Scottrade Center (map)
1401 Clark Ave.
St. Louis - Downtown
phone 314-241-1888
St. Louis Blues vs. Arizona Coyotes

Audubon and Beyond

Mondays-Thursdays, 7:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Continues through June 15
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Among those of the ornithological persuasion, the St. Louis region is of prime interest because of our natural flyways. The Mississippi River underwrites that status; it's a superhighway for migrating birds. We have another feathered fact to boast about: While the renowned birdman John James Audubon was still alive, the St. Louis Mercantile Library acquired a rare reserved copy of his masterwork, Birds of America, from his family. This is tantamount to owning a Gutenberg Bible. Celebrate it with the exhibit Audubon and Beyond: Collecting Five Centuries of Natural History at the St. Louis Mercantile Library on the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus (1 University Drive at Natural Bridge Road; 314-516-7240 or www.umsl.edu/mercantile). The extensive exhibit incorporates sections relating to not only birds but also reptiles, mammals, fish, insects, humans, astronomy, geology, meteorology and more. Audubon and Beyond is open 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and noon to 8 p.m. Sunday (November 9 through June 2017). Admission is free. free admission

University of Missouri-St. Louis-Mercantile Library (map)
1 University Dr. at Natural Bridge Road
North St. Louis County
phone 314-516-7240
Audubon and Beyond

Imagery of Chess: St. Louis Artists

Wednesdays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sundays, 12-5 p.m. and Mondays, Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 17

In 1944 Marcel Duchamp, Julien Levy and Max Ernst organized The Imagery of Chess, an exhibition of chess sets reimagined by artists and performers. Their hope was that people's vision of the chess board and pieces would be expanded beyond the then-accepted options of either the classic Staunton design or the "French" set. In 2016, the World Chess Hall of Fame exhibited some of the works from the 1944 show to acknowledge the debt owed to those artists for forever altering the look of chess. Imagery of Chess: St. Louis Artists is the new follow-up exhibit, which invites twenty local artists to have their way with the game pieces. Among those participating are Eugenia Alexander, who cites the Afrofuturism movement as a key influence on her work; fashion designer and Project Runway vet Michael Drummond; and Yuka Suga, a glass and metals artist who also works as a therapist. A second, simultaneous show, Pow! Capturing Superheroes, Chess & Comics, showcases more than 200 chess-themed comic books (you'd be surprised by how many super villains play chess to keep their minds sharp for optimal intricate scheming functionality). There are also superhero-themed chess boards and a comic book reading room. Both exhibitions open a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, March 23, at the World Chess Hall of Fame (4652 Maryland Avenue; www.worldchesshof.org). Imagery of Chess continues through September 14. Pow! remains up through September 17. Admission is a suggested $5 donation. $5 suggested donation

Rosalyn Drexler: Who Does She Think She Is?

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through April 17

This full-career survey of playwright, novelist and visual artist Rosalyn Drexler offers a rare opportunity to see the breadth of the self-taught artist’s work. Her paintings feature bright colors and figures appropriated from films and print media, which she cropped, enlarged and printed on her canvases and then painted over them. The effect is somewhere between photo-realism, pop art and the visual language of a dream. Chubby Checker depicts a large Chubby mid-twist against squared fields of scarlet and blue and yellow, with couples dancing in 45-sized circles to the left; a smaller Checker echoes the larger one to the right. Love And Violence is far more sharp, a suited man looming over a crumpled blonde woman, grabbing her chin. A triptych of blue windows beneath the tableau show the same man helping to assault a fellow in a trench coat. free admission

#1 in Civil Rights

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through April 15, 2018

St. Louis' history as a wellspring of civil rights activism is deep and impressive. Dred and Harriet Scott's legal fight to be free, Mary Meachum's bold actions leading slaves to freedom across the Mississippi River, the Jefferson Bank protesters organizing to get access to better jobs, Percy Green and the daring VP Ball invaders who challenged St. Louis' powerful elite and the exclusionary nature of their private party — all of these people fought the good fight in St. Louis. #1 in Civil Rights, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; www.mohistory.org) chronicles the history of the civil rights movement in the metro area through artifacts, historical photos, oral histories, art work and actors' performances. Every key moment in the black struggle for equality is covered up to the present day, with artifacts collected by the museum staff following the killing of Michael Brown and the resulting civil unrest in Ferguson playing a major role in the exhibit. #1 in Civil Rights opens on Saturday, March 11, and continues through April 15, 2018. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
#1 in Civil Rights

Route 66: Main Street Through St. Louis

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through July 16

Before the interstate highway system was developed, Route 66 was the safest, fastest way to cross the western half of the country. Starting in Chicago and ending Santa Monica, the "Main Street of America" came right though St. Louis, but not in the mostly straight lines we're accustomed to now. At various points in time, Route 66 traversed Watson Road, Manchester Road, the Martin Luther King Bridge and the Poplar Street Bridge. That shifting route helped spur the growth of cities and businesses along the way, as travelers stopped overnight at the Coral Court Motel or grabbed a bit to eat at the Parkmoor Restaurant. Route 66: Main Street Through St. Louis, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; 314-746-4599 or www.mohistory.org), tells the story of the byway through roadside signs and gas pumps, historic vehicles, bus tours and photographs. Route 66 opens Saturday, June 25, and remains open through July 16, 2017. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
Route 66: Main Street Through St. Louis

In the Realm of Trees

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3

Classical Chinese artists often used trees as inspirations or the focus of their works. Trees and the natural world are the focus of the new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), In the Realm of Trees, which includes photographs, paintings and decorative works that glorify the beauty found in nature. The centerpiece of the show is a set of contemporary photographs called Sacred Tree on Mount Lu, made by Beijing-based photographer Michael Cherney, which was acquired for the museum's permanent collection in 2016 and will be presented for the first time in this exhibit. In the Realm of Trees opens on Friday, March 10, and remains up through Sunday, September 3, in gallery 225. The gallery is open Tuesday through Sunday, and admission is free. free admission

Morpho Mardi Gras

Tuesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Continues through March 31

You may think of Mardi Gras as purple, green and gold, but what about blue? The Butterfly House hosts Morpho Mardi Gras: Bugs, Butterflies and Beads. Experience the joy of watching more than 1,000 gorgeous Blue Morpho butterflies flap their wings, and participate in some Mardi Gras-related activities, with one of the most interesting being creating your own masquerade mask. Also on display will be a large Blue Morpho sculpture by Craig Mitchell Smith, best known for his glass art. Morpho Mardi Gras takes place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday (February 1 through March 31) at the Butterfly House (15193 Olive Boulevard, Chesterfield; www.mobot.org). Admission is $4 to $8. $4-$8

Butterfly House (map)
15193 Olive Blvd.
Chesterfield
phone 636-530-0076
Morpho Mardi Gras

Degas, Impressionism, and the Paris Millinery Trade

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through May 7

Edgar Degas may be best known for his paintings and sculptures of dancers, but he was also fascinated by high-fashion hats and the young women who made them in the fashion capital of the world. This multimedia exhibition includes 60 paintings and pastels that depict high-fashion millinery, some by Degas and others by his contemporaries Manet, Renoir, Cassatt and Toulouse-Lautrec, who were all influenced by Degas’ work. More than 40 period hats will be on display as well, many of them by the acknowledged masters of Belle Epoque millinery, including Madame Georgette and Caroline Reboux. The exhibit is free on Fridays; admission is otherwise $6 to $15. $5-$6, free on Friday

Never the Sinner

Wednesdays, Thursdays, 7:30 p.m., Saturdays, 8 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m. Continues through April 2

Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb shocked Chicago when they murdered Robert Franks, a fourteen-year-old relative of Loeb's. When the two were caught they became an American scandal. Wealthy, well-educated, attractive and charming, the two friends didn't seem like the typical murderers. The more that was revealed about them, the more horripilated the public became. Followers of Nietzsche, the duo believed they were beyond law and morality and could kill without fear of punishment. Driven by their love for each other and their ever-escalating need to thrill, they seemed to be beautiful monsters. John Logan's drama Never the Sinner uses original research and a keen eye for human nature to explore the psychology of young, well-to-do thrillkillers. New Jewish Theatre presents Never the Sinner at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, 8 p.m. Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday (March 16 to April 2) at the Wool Studio Theatre on the campus of the Jewish Community Center (2 Millstone Drive, Creve Coeur; www.newjewishtheatre.org). Tickets are $39.50 to $43.50. $39.50-$43.50

Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form

Wednesdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through May 13

Italian sculptor Medardo Rosso was ahead of his time. Rather than creating heroic sculptures of figures from myth or doing a lucrative business in the monumental bronzes that were popular in the late nineteenth century, Rosso's sculptures seem to be caught emerging from bronze or wax. These almost-manifesting faces and forms are incredibly responsive to light, giving his work a fluid, ephemeral nature not often associated with sculpture. Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form, the new exhibition at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation (3716 Washington Boulevard; www.pulitzerarts.org), includes almost 100 examples of the artist's best work, including some of his photographs and drawings. Experiments in Light and Form opens with a free reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, November 11. The show continues through May 13, and the museum is open Wednesday through Saturday. Admission is free. free admission

Pulitzer Arts Foundation (map)
3716 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-754-1850
Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form

QFest: Lovesong and The Boys in the Band

Wed., March 29, 7 p.m. and March 30-April 2
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For its tenth installment, QFest moves into a new home. The annual festival of LGBT films takes over .Zack (3224 Locust Street; www.cinemastlouis.org) for five nights (Wednesday through Sunday, (March 29 to April 2) of features, classics and documentaries, with topics including the fight for the right to get married in your hometown and ex-girlfriends who share a true crime podcast. Qfest opens with a free screening of Lovesong at 7 p.m. Wednesday. So Yong Kim directs the story of two friends, Sarah and Mindy (Riley Keough and Jena Malone), who take a road trip together mostly because Sarah is tired of being ignored by her husband. Somewhere out there on the road, they both feel a more romantic spark for each other -- but Mindy pulls back and returns home. Several years later, Sarah goes after Mindy and attempts to rekindle the feelings they shared on the ill-fated trip, but arrives shortly before Mindy's own wedding. William Friedkin's 1970 film version of Matt Crowley's seminal play, The Boys in the Band, screens at 9 p.m. ($10 to $13). Michael hosts a birthday party for his pal Harold and their small circle of friends -- all of whom are gay and out. When Michael's college roommate Alan unexpectedly shows up, his thinly veiled revulsion for homosexuality leads to spats, fights and a cruel game designed to humiliate everyone that plays it. $10-$13

.Zack (map)
3224 Locust St
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-304-3602
QFest: Lovesong and The Boys in the Band

Mark Dew:

Wednesdays, Fridays-Sundays, 8 p.m.

To walk into the Hideaway is to enter a place that seems frozen in time, where the dozen or so seats around the piano are packed with your grandparents' friends, decked out in chunky jewelry and tilted fedora hats. Ostensibly, they're here to listen to Mark Dew play — he's here Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights — but you're just as likely to hear one of those old-timers sitting around the piano trill Charlie Rich's "The Most Beautiful Girl." And when Dew finally has his turn at the mic, he'll say something humble, like, "I apologize; it should have been in the key of F." No matter. Dew is the conductor of this time-traveling train, and everyone's on board. Dew, who is blind, has been the piano man here for nearly a quarter-century and jokes that the best part about working here is, well, getting paid. He marvels at the younger set trickling in and its knowledge of the Cash and Sinatra songbooks: "The more the crowd gets into it, the more I play," Dew says. And that's enough to keep him around. "I'm not quite ready to be out to pasture," he says. "Yet." free

Mission: Mars

Mondays-Saturdays, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. and Sundays, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
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NASA is currently working toward the goal of putting humans on Mars in the 2030s, which is not as far away as it sounds. The space agency just last week opened the astronaut application process for the class of 2017, which indicates a certain urgency. If you're eager to see what the future holds, the Mission: Mars exhibition at the Saint Louis Science Center (5050 Oakland Avenue; 314-289-4400 or www.slsc.org) is the place to be. This interactive display is developed by the science center, Washington University and NASA and is divided into two parts. Mission Control gives you the chance to program and remotely drive a simulated Mars rover, complete with the time delay caused by the signal transit time between Earth and Mars. Mission Mars — Base lets you take on the role of an explorer on the Red Planet in the year 2076. You'll conduct scientific operations at key points using one of the science center's two rovers. Mission: Mars is open daily, and admission is free. free admission

DJ Mahf:

Tuesdays, 10 p.m.

From the 2013 RFT Music awards: DJ Mahf works from some place in his brain that pumps out enough enthusiasm to make his work look easy. Performing with a chilled zeal, the Indyground DJ interplays dense minutes of thumping samples with crackling movie clips and fine-tuned, one-and-two-handed scratches. He has already banged around Kansas City's spirited Middle of the Map Festival with labelmate Brett Gretzky, crossed the northern American border and cut and pasted for Red Bull's Thre3style competition this year. Whether live or replayed through Indyground's streaming footage, Mahf exudes the enjoyment he feels: In tempo he bobs at the waist, moving faster in the moments when he is inundated with the floor's energy, always looking pleased. It is Mahf's obvious enjoyment of his craft that puts his sets so squarely in the spotlight. free

Pin-Up Bowl (map)
6191 Delmar Blvd.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-727-5555
DJ Mahf
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