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Elephant and Piggie: We are in a Play

Sun., Feb. 26, 1 & 5 p.m.
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Children's books by author Mo Willems come to life in the musical that young audiences will love, Elephant and Piggie: We Are in a Play, presented by Kennedy Center on Tour. This high-energy show follows the characters of Elephant Gerald and Piggie as they help solve some of life's many burning questions (how to share? what to wear?) through old-fashioned song and dance. This musical is designed to introduce young audiences to the world of theater. Head on over and get ready for "Flippy Floppy Floory." Elephant and Piggie: We Are in a Play is performed at 1 and 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday (February 25 and 26) at Founders' Theatre in the Center of Creative Arts (524 Trinity Avenue, University City; www.cocastl.org). Tickets are $16 to $20. $16-$20

Center of Creative Arts (COCA) (map)
524 Trinity Ave.
Delmar/ The Loop
phone 314-725-6555
Elephant and Piggie: We are in a Play

Shen Yun

Sun., Feb. 26, 2 p.m.

Wondrous, genuine Chinese culture and awe-inspiring spectacle are on full display in the critically acclaimed Shen Yun. The production features 100 dancers showing what they are made of, 400 sets of hand-made costumes and an orchestra that blends the musical styles of the East and West. It all plays out in front of animated backdrops that recreate some of the best architectural structures of classical China. Performance, art and music come together to deliver a spectacle for anyone seeking to experience the richness of Chinese culture. Shen Yun is performed at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Friday and 2 p.m. Saturday (February 25 and 26) at the Peabody Opera House (1400 Market Street; www.peabodyoperahouse.com). Tickets are $70 to $150. $70-$150

Buy Tickets
Peabody Opera House (map)
1400 Market St
St. Louis - Downtown
phone 314-241-1888
Shen Yun

Art in Bloom

Sun., Feb. 26, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
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With the first day of spring only a month away, we know it's not long until the flowers again bloom. And while we wait for the Midwest to get out of its winter funk, the Saint Louis Art Museum gives us a taste of floral beauty with the return of its Art in Bloom: A Celebration of Art and Flowers. This event combines beautiful floral creations from some of the best designers in the region, who offer interpretations of more than 35 works in the museum's collection. There will be a preview party, good food from Panorama executive chef Ivy Magruder, a lecture and demonstration from celebrity florist Jeff Leatham, and fun family activities. Art in Bloom will be held 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday (February 24 to 26) at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Admission to the festival is free. Auditorium programs require tickets, which are $15 to $45. free admission, tickets for auditorium programs are $15 to $45

Saint Louis Art Museum (map)
1 Fine Arts Dr
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-721-0072
Art in Bloom

Graeme of Thrones

Sun., Feb. 26, 2 & 6 p.m.
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Graeme loves Game of Thrones so much that he decides to recreate it on stage with help from his best friend and former crush. But Graeme doesn't have the budget, cast or acting talent to pull it off. Regardless, he works to put on a show that will bowl over the influential producer who is rumored be in the audience. Graeme believes George R.R. Martin would approve. Would he? Who knows, but the critics certainly have. Game of Thrones fans will, too. Graeme of Thrones is performed at 8 p.m. Tuesday to Friday, 4 and 8 p.m. Saturday, and 2 and 6 p.m. on Sunday (February 21 to 26) at Playhouse at Westport Plaza (635 Westport Plaza; www.playhouseatwestport.com). Tickets are $60. $60

The Playhouse at Westport Plaza (map)
635 Westport Plaza
Maryland Heights
phone 314-469-7529
Graeme of Thrones

A View from the Bridge

Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m. Continues through March 5

Eddie Carbone is an Italian-American longshoreman who lives with his wife, Beatrice, and her niece Catherine. Catherine is almost eighteen, and is more interested in boys now — something that bothers Eddie more than it should. When Beatrice invites her cousins Marco and Rodolfo to live with them (they're Italians here illegally, looking for work), Catherine and Rodolfo feel an immediate attraction. This drives Eddie crazy; these feelings he has for her are more than those of a protective uncle. Eddie jeopardizes the brothers and his own marriage when he schemes to break up the young couple. Arthur Miller's drama A View from the Bridge is a bloody-knuckled examination of the differences in how the Old World and the new one settle scores. Clayton Community Theatre presents A View from the Bridge at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday (February 23 to March 5) at the Washington University South Campus Theatre (6501 Clayton Road; www.placeseveryone.org). Tickets are $15 to $20. $15-$20

To Kill a Mockingbird

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through March 5

Jean Louise Finch (better known as Scout) lives the charmed life of a happy child in Maycomb, Alabama. Her father is respected lawyer Atticus Finch, and with her brother and her best friend for companions, her days are filled with fun and games (and occasional scoldings from family housekeeper, Calpurnia). But when Atticus is given the task of defending Tom Robinson, a black man accused of assaulting a white woman, young Scout discovers that the adult world is full of injustice, disappointment and shiftless people. Christopher Sergel's adaptation of Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird continues the Repertory Theatre St. Louis' celebratory 50th season. To Kill a Mockingbird is performed Tuesday through Sunday (February 10 to March 5) at the Loretto-Hilton Center (130 Edgar Road; www.repstl.org). Tickets are $18 to $81.50. $18-$81.50

Morpho Mardi Gras

Tuesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Continues through March 31

You may think of Mardi Gras as purple, green and gold, but what about blue? The Butterfly House hosts Morpho Mardi Gras: Bugs, Butterflies and Beads. Experience the joy of watching more than 1,000 gorgeous Blue Morpho butterflies flap their wings, and participate in some Mardi Gras-related activities, with one of the most interesting being creating your own masquerade mask. Also on display will be a large Blue Morpho sculpture by Craig Mitchell Smith, best known for his glass art. Morpho Mardi Gras takes place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday (February 1 through March 31) at the Butterfly House (15193 Olive Boulevard, Chesterfield; www.mobot.org). Admission is $4 to $8. $4-$8

Butterfly House (map)
15193 Olive Blvd.
Chesterfield
phone 636-530-0076
Morpho Mardi Gras

Rosalyn Drexler: Who Does She Think She Is?

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through April 17

This full-career survey of playwright, novelist and visual artist Rosalyn Drexler offers a rare opportunity to see the breadth of the self-taught artist’s work. Her paintings feature bright colors and figures appropriated from films and print media, which she cropped, enlarged and printed on her canvases and then painted over them. The effect is somewhere between photo-realism, pop art and the visual language of a dream. Chubby Checker depicts a large Chubby mid-twist against squared fields of scarlet and blue and yellow, with couples dancing in 45-sized circles to the left; a smaller Checker echoes the larger one to the right. Love And Violence is far more sharp, a suited man looming over a crumpled blonde woman, grabbing her chin. A triptych of blue windows beneath the tableau show the same man helping to assault a fellow in a trench coat. free admission

Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m., Sundays, 3 p.m. and Sat., March 4, 4 p.m. Continues through March 4

Billie Holiday was a groundbreaker who paved the way for the sounds of jazz and pop. Her songs transcend her time, and her voice was an untouchable instrument that filled the room with unbridled emotion. Her life was also turbulent, as she experienced drug abuse, racism and misogyny. One of her last performances was at a small club in Philadelphia. That night is the setting of Lanie Robertson's Tony Award-winning musical, Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill, presented by Max and Louie Productions with Alexis J. Roston in the title role. Lady Day is performed at 8 p.m. Wednesday to Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday, (February 17 to March 4) at the Kranzberg Arts Center (501 North Grand Boulevard; www.maxandlouie.com). There is one matinee at 4 p.m. on Saturday, March 4. Tickets are $35 to $45. $35-$45

Buy Tickets
Kranzberg Arts Center (map)
501 N Grand Blvd
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-0367
Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill

The Way We Get By

Sundays, 3 p.m. Continues through Feb. 26

The morning after is always a pain, and the person you wake up with can make it better or worse. That premise is the jumping-off point for Neil LaBute's The Way We Get By. This two-person play follows Beth and Doug, who wake up in the same bed after a crazy party and one-night stand. They aren't strangers, but they also aren't certain if their fling could, or should, continue past the morning. St. Louis Actors' Studio continues its season with The Way We Get By. Performances take place at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday (February 10 to 26) at the Gaslight Theater (358 North Boyle Avenue; www.stlas.org). Tickets are $30 to $35. $30-$35

Capturing the City: Photographs from the Streets of St. Louis, 1900-1930

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through March 12

St. Louis was booming in the early twentieth century, growing beyond its frontier boundaries at a rapid rate. The St. Louis Street Department documented these growing pains, both to record the challenges it faced and show how much work was being done. Charles Clement Holt marshaled a force of photographers to shoot street work in progress, dilapidated areas needing improvement, finished municipal projects and -- quite by chance -- the daily life of a burgeoning city. At its peak, the project knocked out 6,000 photographs a year. Many of these were eventually thrown out, but a historian rescued some 300 prime images. A selection of these images comprise the exhibition Capturing the City: Photographs from the Streets of St. Louis, 1900-1930. These images show a St. Louis that is familiar but vastly different: Horses being hoisted out of holes in the street are a rarity these days, and Market Street never has musicians on flatbed trucks anymore urging us to keep the city clean. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
Capturing the City: Photographs from the Streets of St. Louis, 1900-1930

Route 66: Main Street Through St. Louis

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through July 16

Before the interstate highway system was developed, Route 66 was the safest, fastest way to cross the western half of the country. Starting in Chicago and ending Santa Monica, the "Main Street of America" came right though St. Louis, but not in the mostly straight lines we're accustomed to now. At various points in time, Route 66 traversed Watson Road, Manchester Road, the Martin Luther King Bridge and the Poplar Street Bridge. That shifting route helped spur the growth of cities and businesses along the way, as travelers stopped overnight at the Coral Court Motel or grabbed a bit to eat at the Parkmoor Restaurant. Route 66: Main Street Through St. Louis, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; 314-746-4599 or www.mohistory.org), tells the story of the byway through roadside signs and gas pumps, historic vehicles, bus tours and photographs. Route 66 opens Saturday, June 25, and remains open through July 16, 2017. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
Route 66: Main Street Through St. Louis

Degas, Impressionism, and the Paris Millinery Trade

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through May 7

Edgar Degas may be best known for his paintings and sculptures of dancers, but he was also fascinated by high-fashion hats and the young women who made them in the fashion capital of the world. This multimedia exhibition includes 60 paintings and pastels that depict high-fashion millinery, some by Degas and others by his contemporaries Manet, Renoir, Cassatt and Toulouse-Lautrec, who were all influenced by Degas’ work. More than 40 period hats will be on display as well, many of them by the acknowledged masters of Belle Epoque millinery, including Madame Georgette and Caroline Reboux. The exhibit is free on Fridays; admission is otherwise $6 to $15. $5-$6, free on Friday

Saint Louis Art Museum (map)
1 Fine Arts Dr
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-721-0072
Degas, Impressionism, and the Paris Millinery Trade

Audubon and Beyond

Mondays-Thursdays, 7:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Continues through June 15
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Among those of the ornithological persuasion, the St. Louis region is of prime interest because of our natural flyways. The Mississippi River underwrites that status; it's a superhighway for migrating birds. We have another feathered fact to boast about: While the renowned birdman John James Audubon was still alive, the St. Louis Mercantile Library acquired a rare reserved copy of his masterwork, Birds of America, from his family. This is tantamount to owning a Gutenberg Bible. Celebrate it with the exhibit Audubon and Beyond: Collecting Five Centuries of Natural History at the St. Louis Mercantile Library on the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus (1 University Drive at Natural Bridge Road; 314-516-7240 or www.umsl.edu/mercantile). The extensive exhibit incorporates sections relating to not only birds but also reptiles, mammals, fish, insects, humans, astronomy, geology, meteorology and more. Audubon and Beyond is open 7:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and noon to 8 p.m. Sunday (November 9 through June 2017). Admission is free. free admission

University of Missouri-St. Louis-Mercantile Library (map)
1 University Dr. at Natural Bridge Road
North St. Louis County
phone 314-516-7240
Audubon and Beyond

St. Louis Blues vs. Edmonton Oilers

Tue., Feb. 28, 7 p.m.

What the what? The St. Louis Blues just completed a five-game sweep on the road, and every skater on the ice contributed (let's quickly forget what happened with the Panthers). This is a changed team since the release of Ken Hitchcock and the installation of head coach Mike Yeo. Passes are crisp, and they're skating the puck in instead of the ol' dump 'n' chase. The sieve-like defense also tightened up — things are very positive, indeed. The revitalized Blues take on the Edmonton Oilers tonight at 7 p.m. at Scottrade Center (1401 Clark Avenue; www.stlblues.com). Remaining tickets are $21.75 to $353. $21.75-$353

Scottrade Center (map)
1401 Clark Ave.
St. Louis - Downtown
phone 314-241-1888
St. Louis Blues vs. Edmonton Oilers
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