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Daniel Shular: Camp-Pain, 2016

Tuesdays-Saturdays. Continues through Jan. 28

Is it too soon to relive the 2016 presidential race? Daniel Shular is an independent photojournalist who followed the campaign from start to finish as it criss-crossed the country. He photographed the supporters and protesters who filled the streets as America struggled with the most unusual election season in recent memory. With no news organization to subsidize his journey, Shular resorted to sleeping on couches, in his car and occasionally springing for a room in a seedy motel. Camp-Pain, 2016 is an exhibit of Shular's best work, some of which you may recognize from Fox News, Al Jazeera, the Daily Mail or any of the other outlets that bought his photos as he followed the race. The show is open Tuesday through Saturday (January 3 to 28), at the Dark Room (615 North Grand Boulevard; www.thedarkroomstl.com) with the opening reception on Friday, January 6. free admission

The Dark Room (map)
615 N Grand Blvd
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-531-3416
Daniel Shular: Camp-Pain, 2016

An American in Paris

Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Tuesdays-Fridays, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Jan. 29, 1 p.m. Continues through Jan. 29

American G.I.s Jerry and Adam decide to stay in Paris after World War II to pursue their artistic goals, Jerry as a painter and Adam as a composer. Joined by Henri, a wealthy heir who dreams of becoming a a song-and-dance man, the three get back to living life in peacetime. There's also the matter of Lise, the beautiful French dancer Jerry recently bumped into — she's worth sticking around for as well. But Jerry's not the only one dazzled by her charms, and the course of true love never did run smooth. The stage version of An American in Paris is inspired by the 1951 MGM film, and it features the same swooping romance and exceptional dancing that made its namesake a classic. An American in Paris is performed Tuesday through Sunday (January 17 to 29) at the Fox Theatre (527 North Grand Boulevard; www.fabulousfox.com). Tickets are $25 to $95. $25-$95

Buy Tickets
The Fox Theatre (map)
527 N. Grand Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-534-1111
An American in Paris

One Last Job

Mondays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m., Sundays, 5 p.m., Tue., Feb. 7, 8 p.m. and Wed., Feb. 8, 8 p.m. Continues through Feb. 5

Ireland has had more than its fair share of woe over the past century. The 1916 Irish Revolution would become a drawn-out civil war, exacerbated by numerous factions with different ideas of what a free and independent Ireland should look like. Local playwright Patrick Conroy pays tribute to the centennial of the Irish Revolution with his new play, One Last Job. A young English soldier in Ireland meets an older IRA operative who has recently taken a step back from the armed struggle. But just because the older man is out of the game doesn't mean the players see him as off-limits — and being seen with an English soldier is a good way to get permanently retired. Cocktails and Curtain Calls presents One Last Job at 5 p.m. Sunday and 8 p.m. Monday and Tuesday (January 23 to February 5), and again at 8 p.m Tuesday and Wednesday, February 7 and 8. All shows take place at McGurk's Irish Pub (1200 Russell Boulevard; www.eventbrite.com).Tickets are $20 to $25. $20-$25

John D. McGurk's Irish Pub (map)
1200 Russell Blvd.
St. Louis - Soulard
phone 314-776-8309
One Last Job

Impressions of War

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Feb. 12

War is often commemorated in statues and portraiture with a political slant. Our generals are heroic and our troops are manly, while the other guys are all slobs and monsters. But some artists document war without an official commission. Francisco de Goya made his print series The Disasters of War during Napoleon's occupation of Spain, and de Goya pulled no punches in depicting the inhumanity, cruelty and depredations wrought in the name of conquest. These 80 prints are part of Impressions of War, the new exhibition in galleries 234 and 235 at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park (www.slam.org). Impressions of War also includes Max Beckmann's portfolio Hell, which he created in Berlin in the immediate aftermath of World War I. Jacque Callot's series on the religious wars that rent apart Europe in the mid-1800s and Daniel Heyman's Amman Portfolio — the story of what occurred in Abu Ghraib prison, as told by Iraqi inmates — are also part of the exhibit. Impressions of War is on display from August 5 to February 12, 2017. The museum is open Tuesday through Sunday, and admission is free. free admission

Saint Louis Art Museum (map)
1 Fine Arts Dr
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-721-0072
Impressions of War

Japanese Painting & Calligraphy: Highlights from the Collection

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Feb. 12

Despite its recent expansion, the Saint Louis Art Museum (www.slam.org) does not have enough space to display all the art in its various collections. This is why exhibitions are rotated periodically, and it's also why the new show Japanese Painting & Calligraphy: Highlights from the Collection is noteworthy. A pair of folding screens painted by Kaihō Yūshō in the sixteenth century are the main draw, having not been on display for seven years. Yūshō painted an ethereal landscape using ink and gold that represents the illusory nature of the material world. Japanese Painting and Calligraphy is on display Tuesday through Sunday (August 19 to February 12) in gallery 225. Admission is free. free admission

Saint Louis Art Museum (map)
1 Fine Arts Dr
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-721-0072
Japanese Painting & Calligraphy: Highlights from the Collection

Steinberg Skating Rink

Fridays, Saturdays, 10-12 a.m. and Mondays-Thursdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through Feb. 23
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You could do worse things in your life than learn to ice skate. It's great exercise, sure, but skating's real value is that it's a solitary pursuit that gives you time to think. Once you become proficient you can turn your brain off and glide along it's the cheapest re-set button available. The restorative powers are even greater if you can do it outdoors, and that's exactly where Steinberg Skating Rink (400 Jefferson Drive; www.steinbergskatingrink.com) is located. The city's largest rink is a great place to stretch your legs, get some fresh air and realign your system, especially during the stressful holiday season. Steinberg is open from 10 a.m. to midnight December 16 to January 7 so you can burn off some steam late into the evening. Regular hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 10 a.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday through February 23. Admission is $7 for an all-day pass, and skate rental is $6 for hockey or figure skates. $7 admission, $6 skate rental

Steinberg Skating Rink (map)
400 Jefferson Drive
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-367-7465 or 314-361-0613
Steinberg Skating Rink

Humans of St. Louis

Saturdays, Sundays, 12-5 p.m. and Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Feb. 4

If you do a lot of walking, you will encounter any number of people. You don't really meet them, though. To do that you'd have to stop and engage in conversation, which means listening more than speaking. It's an old-fashioned thing to do in a country dominated by social media, which is more about broadcasting our own beliefs and ideas. Humans of St. Louis (the local wing of the "Humans" movement started by Brandon Stratton's Humans of New York project), is a documentary storytelling collective that aims to meet in person individual St. Louisans and give them a platform to discuss what's on their mind. Photographers Lindy Drew, Caroline Fish and Dessa Somerside have met more than 1,200 people during the project. The art exhibition Humans of St. Louis is a collection of their favorite encounters. The show opens with a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, December 9, at the Regional Arts Commission (6128 Delmar Boulevard; www.racstl.org). The show remains up through February 4, and the gallery is open daily. free admission

Regional Arts Commission (map)
6128 Delmar Blvd.
Delmar/ The Loop
phone 314-863-5811
Humans of St. Louis

All My Sons

Wednesdays-Fridays, 8 p.m., Tuesdays, 7 p.m., Saturdays, 4 & 8 p.m. and Sun., Jan. 29, 2 & 7 p.m. Continues through Jan. 28

World War II has been won and done for just over a year, and Joe Keller's life still hasn't returned to normal. There is the pain of his missing older son Larry, presumed by most to be killed in action at this point, but Joe's wife Kate refuses to give up hope. There's also the matter of Joe's former business partner Steve, still in prison for shipping defective engine parts to the military. The corners cut by their factory resulted in the deaths of 21 American pilots, and the stain of it still clings to Joe. When his second son, Chris, proposes marriage to Steve's daughter Ann, Joe's life begins to fall apart. Arthur Miller's tragedy All My Sons is a stark look at the failures of a man who has the appearance of decency but not the morals. The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis continues its season with All My Sons. Performances take place Tuesday through Sunday (January 6 to 29) at the Loretto-Hilton Center (130 Edgar Road; www.repstl.org). Tickets are $18 to $81.50. $18-$81.50

Constellations

Wednesdays-Fridays, 8 p.m., Sundays, 2 & 7 p.m., Tue., Jan. 24, 7 p.m., Saturdays, 4 & 8 p.m. and Tue., Jan. 31, 8 p.m. Continues through Feb. 5

Noted musical philosopher Haddaway had a minor but contagious hit single with his ruminations on love and what it is, but playwright Nick Payne frames the many possibilities of human romantic relationships through a prism of theoretical physics and its conception of the multiverse. Marianne, a physicist, meets Roland, a more regular sort, at a party; there is an undeniable spark between them. In one universe, the two pursue the relationship after the party breaks up. In a parallel universe, they don't. All of the possible permutations of their relationship (potential and real) lead somewhere, and all of these outcomes are contained within Constellations. The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis presents Constellations Tuesday through Sunday (January 20 to February 5) at the Loretto-Hilton Center (130 Edgar Road; www.repstl.org). Tickets are $43.50 to $67.50. $43.50-$67.50

Capturing the City: Photographs from the Streets of St. Louis, 1900-1930

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through March 12

St. Louis was booming in the early twentieth century, growing beyond its frontier boundaries at a rapid rate. The St. Louis Street Department documented these growing pains, both to record the challenges it faced and show how much work was being done. Charles Clement Holt marshaled a force of photographers to shoot street work in progress, dilapidated areas needing improvement, finished municipal projects and -- quite by chance -- the daily life of a burgeoning city. At its peak, the project knocked out 6,000 photographs a year. Many of these were eventually thrown out, but a historian rescued some 300 prime images. A selection of these images comprise the exhibition Capturing the City: Photographs from the Streets of St. Louis, 1900-1930. These images show a St. Louis that is familiar but vastly different: Horses being hoisted out of holes in the street are a rarity these days, and Market Street never has musicians on flatbed trucks anymore urging us to keep the city clean. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
Capturing the City: Photographs from the Streets of St. Louis, 1900-1930

Constructed Visions II

Saturdays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Tuesdays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Continues through Feb. 24
phone 314-727-6266
media@stlouisartistsguild.org

The St. Louis Artists’ Guild would like to invite you to Constructed Visions II; a juried exhibition featuring regional sculpture and fine craft artists with works in ceramics, fiber, glass, metal, paper, plastic, stone, and wood. Artists selected by curator, professor, and juror, Terry Suhre whom will award cash prizes totaling $1000 at the opening reception. This exhibition is free and will be on view to the public until February 25, 2017, during gallery hours: Tuesday – Friday 10am - 6pm and Saturday 10am – 4pm. Free. Refreshments Provided. Free

http://stlouisartistsguild.org
St. Louis Artists' Guild (map)
12 N Jackson Ave
Clayton
phone 314-727-6266
Constructed Visions II

Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form

Wednesdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through May 13

Italian sculptor Medardo Rosso was ahead of his time. Rather than creating heroic sculptures of figures from myth or doing a lucrative business in the monumental bronzes that were popular in the late nineteenth century, Rosso's sculptures seem to be caught emerging from bronze or wax. These almost-manifesting faces and forms are incredibly responsive to light, giving his work a fluid, ephemeral nature not often associated with sculpture. Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form, the new exhibition at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation (3716 Washington Boulevard; www.pulitzerarts.org), includes almost 100 examples of the artist's best work, including some of his photographs and drawings. Experiments in Light and Form opens with a free reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, November 11. The show continues through May 13, and the museum is open Wednesday through Saturday. Admission is free. free admission

Pulitzer Arts Foundation (map)
3716 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-754-1850
Medardo Rosso: Experiments in Light and Form

Route 66: Main Street Through St. Louis

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through July 16

Before the interstate highway system was developed, Route 66 was the safest, fastest way to cross the western half of the country. Starting in Chicago and ending Santa Monica, the "Main Street of America" came right though St. Louis, but not in the mostly straight lines we're accustomed to now. At various points in time, Route 66 traversed Watson Road, Manchester Road, the Martin Luther King Bridge and the Poplar Street Bridge. That shifting route helped spur the growth of cities and businesses along the way, as travelers stopped overnight at the Coral Court Motel or grabbed a bit to eat at the Parkmoor Restaurant. Route 66: Main Street Through St. Louis, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; 314-746-4599 or www.mohistory.org), tells the story of the byway through roadside signs and gas pumps, historic vehicles, bus tours and photographs. Route 66 opens Saturday, June 25, and remains open through July 16, 2017. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
Route 66: Main Street Through St. Louis

Off Modern: In What Time Do We Live?

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through March 2
phone 314-773-1533
info@theluminaryarts.com

On Friday, January 20th, The Luminary opens it's season with Off Modern: In What Time Do We Live?, the first in a series of interconnected exhibitions opening over the next six months. The exhibition acts as an atlas pinning together disparate images to make small marks of historical change and cultural recurrence comprehensible. The exhibition features work from Elizabeth Atterbury, Bruce Burton, Laura Ann Davis, Vaughn Davis, Jeff Eaton, Assaf Evron, Tatiana Istomina, Nicholas Mangan, David Whelan, and Steph Zimmerman. Free

http://theluminaryarts.com/exhibitions/off-modern-in-what-time-do-we-live

Jefferson Barracks Telephone Museum

Wednesdays-Sundays, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Continues through June 30
phone 314-416-8004
jbtelmuseum@yahoo.com
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@ Jefferson Barracks Telephone Museum, 12 Hancock Ave, St. Louis MO 63125
Housed in a beautifully restored 1896 building, the museum features an extensive collection of telephones manufactured from the 1900s through the 2000s, hundreds of pieces of telephone-related equipment and memorabilia and military telephones from WWII through the Vietnam War. It is located in the historic Jefferson Barracks Park, a 15 minute drive south of downtown St. Louis. The self-guided, accessible museum has many hands-on, how-things-work displays. The displays were created to inspire an interest in engineering and history. Guided tours are available for groups of 10 or more and should be scheduled at least two weeks before the tour. Adults $5; Seniors Age 60+ $4; Children Ages 5-12 $3; Children Age 4 & Under-Free; Active Military w/ID-Free

http://www.facebook.com/jbtelmuseum
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