Friday, January 29, 2016

4 Provocative Art Shows Opening This Weekend in St. Louis

Posted By on Fri, Jan 29, 2016 at 7:00 AM

click to enlarge Hito Steyerl, still from “HOW NOT TO BE SEEN: A Fucking Didactic Educational .MOV File,” 2013. Single-channel HD digital video and sound in architectural environment, 15:52 min. Courtesy of the artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York. Image CC 4.0 Hito Steyerl.
  • Hito Steyerl, still from “HOW NOT TO BE SEEN: A Fucking Didactic Educational .MOV File,” 2013. Single-channel HD digital video and sound in architectural environment, 15:52 min. Courtesy of the artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York. Image CC 4.0 Hito Steyerl.

Four really interesting art shows are opening this weekend in St. Louis-area galleries and museums. We've got all the details.

Interested in a weekend event that's a bit less artsy? See our list of fun things to do for less than $30 instead. Either way, we've got your weekend covered.

To See Without Being Seen: Contemporary Art and Drone Warfare 
Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum 
1 Brookings Drive | kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu 

Opens 7 p.m. Fri., Jan. 29. Continues through Apr. 24. 
Drone warfare is the fastest-growing branch of the U.S. Air Force thanks to its cost efficiency and (purportedly) high success rate. But remotely piloted missile carriers rely on the quality of the images they transmit back to their distant pilots, as well as that pilot’s judgment. To See Without Being Seen: Contemporary Art and Drone Warfare explores the pitfalls of the technology and raises questions about surveillance, power and fear. This group exhibition features work from seventeen artists and collectives in a variety of media, including Shinseungback Kimyonghun’s Cloud Face (images of clouds that facial recognition software recognize as human) and Molleindustria’s video game Unmanned, which lets you simulate being a drone pilot by day and a family man by night.


Barry Leibman: Imaginary Gardens
Duane Reed Gallery
4729 McPherson Avenue | www.duanereedgallery.com
Opens 5 p.m. Fri., Jan. 29. Continues through Mar. 5.

Old-timers may remember Barry Leibman as the former co-owner of Left Bank Books. His paintings are (perhaps not surprisingly) inspired by the works of great writers, both of prose and of music. In Imaginary Gardens, Leibman creates in paint and mixed media a theoretical personal garden for various writers. Laurie Anderson is a diptych that hints at a house, an outbuilding and sky of russet and ocher blocks overlapping on the left side; the right side echoes the left in black and white. Hildegard Von Bingen reflects the austere life of the medieval German composer and religious seer with an assemblage of white and beige squares surrounding a single, snow-white rectangle. Above the rectangle, the celestial chorus that powered her visions shimmers in a riot of polychrome shapes.

click to enlarge Gabriele Evertz, Intensification (Domicile), 2014, Acrylic on canvas over panel, 60 x 60 inches
  • Gabriele Evertz, Intensification (Domicile), 2014, Acrylic on canvas over panel, 60 x 60 inches


Minus Space: Color
Philip Slein Gallery
4735 McPherson Avenue | www.philipsleingallery.com
Opens 5 p.m. Fri., Jan. 29. Continues through Mar. 12.

Brooklyn’s Minus Space gallery concentrates on reductive, abstract art. This show highlights the work of Gabriele Evertz, Robert Swain and Sanford Wurmfeld, three Minus Space painters whose work demonstrates color’s power as an energy and a force for drawing out emotions. All three painters also utilize a strong sense of geometry and precision, harnessing color’s power in lines and grids that veer off toward infinity.


A Decade of Collecting Prints, Drawings and Photographs 
Saint Louis Art Museum Forest Park | www.slam.org 
Opens Fri., Jan. 29. Continues through July 17. 

The Saint Louis Art Museum is constantly acquiring new pieces for its collection. In the past decade, more than 700 artworks have been added — A Decade of Collecting Prints, Drawings and Photographs features just 62 of them, but the quality can’t be beat. The worried woman in Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother is a familiar face thanks to its frequent use in publications, but now you can stand eye-to-eye with her. If you gaze on the technical perfection of Martin Schongauer’s fifteenth-century engraving The Nativity and find yourself craving more, you should make an appointment to visit the museum’s Study Room for Prints, Drawings and Photographs. More than 14,000 works are available for closer examination, and it costs nothing to view them. 


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