Tuesday, March 15, 2011

New Release Highlights for March 15: Travis Barker, the Dodos, J Mascis, New York Dolls, Rise Against

Posted By on Tue, Mar 15, 2011 at 9:00 AM

(New albums are typically released on Tuesdays, i.e., today. What can you spend your hard-earned pennies on this week? Find out below.)

click to enlarge This is the Second Album From a Band Called Adebisi Shank
  • This is the Second Album From a Band Called Adebisi Shank

*Adebisi Shank, This Is The Second Album From A Band Called Adebisi Shank Sputnik Music gave Adebisi Shank a 4.0 review, saying: "For their second record, the Adebisis have expanded upon the blueprint of their first with a range of new influences: they experiment with vocals, both lead (the 'Mr. Roboto'-style vocoder chorus on 'Genki Shank') and embedded (Villagers' Conor O'Brien guests on 'Europa'); there's a hint of saxophone on triumphant opener 'International Dreambeat'; and to everybody's great relief guitarist Lar Kaye has belatedly discovered the top three strings on his guitar. At 10 tracks and almost 40 minutes - nearly twice as long as the first - the second album is a far more developed and nuanced record."

click to enlarge Travis Barker's Give the Drummer Some
  • Travis Barker's Give the Drummer Some

*Travis Barker, Give The Drummer Some Prefix reviewed Barker's solo venture: "The tracks that have leaked so far from Travis Barker's Give The Drummer Some have left me wondering if one of the first singles, 'Jump Down,' was a fluke. That Cool Kids-featured cut found Barker essentially lacing them with a beat Chuck Inglish could have made himself. But since then, we have only heard rap-rock hybrids that sound like Rage Against The Machine-lite. Then again, I might be writing that only because Tom Morello guested on the so-so 'Carry It.' Following that track's lead is Barker's latest, 'Can the Drummer Get Some,' a riff-heavy posse cut featuring middling verses from Game, Lil Wayne, and Rick Ross and a Swizz Beatz hook. It's not a terrible track, though, even if it does feel like a relic from 1997. Oh, and is that the piano line from 'Lazy Sunday'?"

click to enlarge Caitlin Rose's Own Side Now
  • Caitlin Rose's Own Side Now

*Caitlin Rose, Own Side Now Guardian reviewed Rose's latest: "Earlier this year, Nashville-based Caitlin Rose released an EP of songs recorded in 2008, which introduced a promisingly wry lyricist unable to decide whether she wanted to sound like Loretta Lynn or Kimya Dawson. On her debut album, the 23-year-old thrillingly finds her own voice. Own Side is sad and strong as she walks away from a careless lover, playful in Spare Me as she dashes off the delicious line: 'Love is just one more useless thing you don't need, but you can't throw away.' Now pure country, her songwriting has taken a leap, too, delivering a profusion (sometimes an excess) of memorable choruses and arrangements freighted with emotion."

*Caitlin Rose's video for "Own Side"

click to enlarge Cornershop and the Double-O Groove
  • Cornershop and the Double-O Groove

*Cornershop, Cornershop And The Double-O Groove Spin reviewed the Double-O Groove: "These wry Anglo-Indian groovemeisters are long past the point of trying to score another 'Brimful of Asha' leftfield hit. So they follow up 2009's slept-on Judy Sucks a Lemon for Breakfast with this low-key collaboration featuring newcomer Bubbley Kaur, whose piping vocals nudge Cornershop toward Punjabi folk music. As always, the ramshackle, kitchen-sink beats are well worth sampling: 'The 911 Curry,' with its chopped-up disco horns, is especially tasty. Minus the mock-heroic guitars, though, frontman Tjinder Singh's globalist critiques lose some of their pop-political punch."

click to enlarge The Death Set's Michel Poiccard
  • The Death Set's Michel Poiccard

*Death Set, Michel Poiccard Drowned In Sound reviewed Michel Poiccard: "Seventeen tracks are crammed into 36 minutes, and to considerable effect. The weaker tunes (and there are several) manage to justify their place by virtue of being constituent parts of the wider onslaught - and besides, if you don't like one track, you know there'll be another bursting forth any second. It also means that, within the album's defined aesthetic, there's plenty of scope for variety. So while the somewhat Britpop-esque 'Michel Poiccard Prefers The Old' struggles to convince, the following four and a half minutes offer not only the snot-nosed insolence of 'I Like The Wrong Way', but also the Beastie Boys-ish romp 'A Problem Is A Problem It Don't Matter Where You From' and the exhilarating trebly frenzy of 'Too Much Fun For Regrets'."

*The official video for "Slap Slap Slap Pound Up Down Snap"

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