Tuesday, September 15, 2015

Why Do We Complain So Much About LouFest?

Posted By on Tue, Sep 15, 2015 at 8:01 AM

click to enlarge A startling lack of diversity — in both the acts and, by extension, the attendees — is one cause for concern. - KELLY GLUECK
  • Kelly Glueck
  • A startling lack of diversity — in both the acts and, by extension, the attendees — is one cause for concern.

St. Louis loves to complain. We're also passionate about our city. Mix up this cocktail and we'll drop our customary Midwest politeness: You'll hear enthusiastic speeches about every regional issue from the opening of a new IKEA to a possible new football stadium.

There are many things that divide this town, but most complaints are dropped if the matter in question has been shown to benefit the residents. Arguments are often ended with a conciliatory, good-natured, “Whatever. If it's good for the city I guess it's fine.”

But LouFest has been met with outright ire since the annual music festival began six years ago. Seasoned festival-goers whine that it's too small. Those of us accustomed to smaller concerts whine that it's too big. And each year the lineup is met with cries of “LameFest” or “more like PooFest.” Every single year there is an avalanche of criticism for this music festival, even if it does bring in money and is “good for the city.”

Why? I'm not sure, but I have a theory. I think that we're all quick to whine about LouFest simply because of the actual name of the festival.

Most other major music festivals don't have a tight association with the cities in which they are held. For example, while we all know that while Lollapalooza is now held in Chicago, it doesn't necessarily represent Chicago. It could be held anywhere or moved to any other city without losing its identity. But with a name like LouFest, it's implied that this festival somehow represents St. Louis.

This is why we all get bitchy. That "Lou" gives us assumed ownership, and therefore a free pass for complaining rights. And when I look at the LouFest lineup, it doesn't at all represent the St. Louis that I know. So just like everyone else, I start complaining, too.

click to enlarge Pokey LaFarge, one of three St. Louis-based acts that performed at this year's fest. - ROBERT ROHE
  • Robert Rohe
  • Pokey LaFarge, one of three St. Louis-based acts that performed at this year's fest.

I interviewed LouFest founder Brian Cohen and executive producer Charlie Jones a couple of years ago and they really won me over. I asked nothing but hard questions and I was impressed with their answers. To be blunt, I expected them to be annoyed at my insistence that the festival didn't include enough local acts in decent time slots. They countered my questions with a list of all of the regional considerations they'd included, like making a point of booking a couple of local bands each year and renting space to St. Louis merchants. They also stressed that they didn't have to include any local flavor at all. True. Very true. Can't argue with that.

I've been to LouFest on three different occasions to see three different bands. One time was to see Dinosaur Jr (on a side-stage at a criminally early time in the day) and the other two times were during different years to catch separate headliners. As such, I've seen with my own eyes that LouFest does lots of things right. From the very beginning the organizers were focused on recycling, encouraging people to bike to the festival and general eco-friendliness. And it's lovely see major touring bands while lounging on the grass of beautiful Forest Park instead suffering through the flooded concrete bathrooms at Riverport.

I prefer my music just a little weirder than most festivals offer, so I never really expect the LouFest lineup to thrill me. But this year, in particular, the lineup immediately struck me as relentlessly bland. As I looked over the list of performers I realized why: Women and people of color were woefully underrepresented.

So I crunched the numbers.

Continue to page two for more.

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