Friday, September 16, 2016

The 8 Best Shows in St. Louis This Weekend: September 16 to 18

Posted By on Fri, Sep 16, 2016 at 7:01 AM

click to enlarge D.R.I. will perform at Ready Room this Sunday as part of Thrashamania 7. - PHOTO BY JANA PERRY
  • Photo by Jana Perry
  • D.R.I. will perform at Ready Room this Sunday as part of Thrashamania 7.

Have you recovered from LouFest yet? Looking forward to next week's inaugural Murmuration festival? Neither is a good enough excuse to stay in this weekend, with stops from crossover thrash legends D.R.I., the FarFetched collective's annual Brave New World showcase and even a stop from ZZ Top. Check out our full picks below: 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16


Trophy Wives w/ Austin Jones, Run 2 Cover, Curses
7 p.m., $18-$20. The Firebird, 2706 Olive St., St. Louis, 314-535-0353.
By Joseph Hess
Coming from Providence, Rhode Island, Trophy Wives brings solid pop-punk full of classic rock's guilty pleasures. The trappings are all here: Sweet riffs noodle over a clicky double-kick pedal while the vocalist croons in that middle ground between screaming and singing. Hints of emo from the early '00s peek through, but make no mistake: posi-vibes fuel these jams. This power-pop baby was clearly born after nine months of jamming Yellowcard and Sum 41 in the womb.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17

Bryan Adams
8 p.m., $29.95-$$95.95. Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, I-70 & Earth City Expwy., Maryland Heights, 314-298-9944.
By Allison Babka
Let's get this out of the way right now: There's a large percentage of St. Louis women whose idea of the perfect musician boyfriend was solidified right around the time Bryan Adams released Reckless in 1984. Sure, Cuts Like a Knife earned him plenty of fans, but when young ladies heard the Canadian singer's recording of "Heaven" during their first middle-school dance, or came across "Summer of '69" on MTV a year later, their hormones went into overdrive. And why wouldn't they? Adams was — and still is — a kind-eyed, spiky-haired guitarist who sings about romance and fun times. He's the Mom-approved Peter Pan of rock, and when he punctuates nearly every verse with an enthusiastic "YEEEEEAH!" we know it comes straight from the heart. 

Dracla w/ Path of Might, Van Buren
8 p.m., $8. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050.
By Ryan Wasoba
Before Dracla released a five-song EP in March of this year, the only trace of Ray Kannenberg’s cryptic project online was the Google suggestion “Did you mean Dracula?” This self-titled EP sums up the group aurally: Fuzzed-out psychedelic proto-metal akin to Blue Cheer with vocals that, for lack of a less obvious comparison, recall a monochrome old-style vampire. The music Dracla plays is only half the story. The trio-recently-turned-quintet has earned its still-fresh reputation on the pure insanity of its live shows, which may or may not involve fuzzed-to-hell bass, fake blood, semi-ironic guitar wailing, capes and at least one member of Bug Chaser. But without a Facebook page, Twitter account or Instagram to speak of, the only way to figure out the mysteries of Dracla is get off your computer/phone/tablet and go to an actual show.

FarFetched Brave New World Showcase
7 p.m., $10. The Luminary, 2701 Cherokee Street. 314-773-1533.
By Christian Schaeffer
Our culture’s current fascination with dystopian futures runs deep, what with all your Hunger Games and your Maze Runners and your Divergents. Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World is the granddaddy of much of this fiction, and its Shakespearean title belies its fear for humanity’s forward progress. The local genre-busting collective FarFetched has long borrowed Brave New World as the name of its yearly showcase and party, and while many of its artists have much to say about the present day, it’s not hard to hear a hopeful strain in the group’s futuristic blend of hip-hip, shoegaze and experimental pop. This year’s featured artists include the dubby and distorted Hands & Feet, gauzy popsmiths Golden Curls, hard-hitting live funk band Superhero Killer and hip-hop act Subtle Aggression Monopoly.

Joan Shelley w/ Maiden Radio
8 p.m., $10-$12. Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis, 314-773-3363.
By Roy Kasten
Louisville, Kentucky native Joan Shelley is an unlikely neo-folk heroine, mostly because there's not very much that is neo about her. Last year's Daniel Martin Moore-recorded Over and Even found Shelley utterly confessional, unapologetically acoustic, fully in touch with the elusive art of voice and interlocked guitars (accompanist Nathan Salsburg plays like the singer's soul twin) and packed with song after song of unerring feelings and melodies. Like no voice and songwriter since the late Kate Wolf, Shelley evokes the spirituality of everyday life: the sensual glories of love, the unpredictable power of nature, the heartbreaking sweetness of memories and the fate of our human failings. No one sings personal truths like Ms. Shelley. The trio of Cheyenne Mize, Julia Purcell and Shelley herself (aka Maiden Radio) will open with a set of harmony-rich, tradition-inspired songs from the bluegrass state.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18

Thrashamania 7 w/ D.R.I., Deathwish, Hell Night, bastard, Tropical Storm!, The Spiders, Reign, Smash Potater, The Lurking Corpses
5 p.m., $15-$20. The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Ave, St. Louis, 314-833-3929.
By Daniel Hill
Crossover pioneers D.R.I. have been playing a warp-speed version of the thrash-metal/punk hybrid genre they helped create since 1982, when they first picked up instruments in singer Kurt Brecht's parents' Houston home. The band quickly developed a reputation as one of the fastest bands in the world, gaining tremendous notoriety for their high-energy tours and subsequently releasing seven full-length LPs between '83 and '95. Still a touring force, D.R.I. went silent on wax until the release of June's But Wait...There's More! — finally closing a 21-year gap between releases. The EP includes three new studio tracks and two re-recordings of classic material, and on the whole leans more toward the punk side of the spectrum. Here's hoping an LP will come sometime in the next couple decades. D.R.I. comes to town as a part of Thrashamania, now in its seventh iteration, meaning wall-to-wall, high-energy metal is on the menu all night long. Buy a neck brace in advance.

Agent Orange w/ Counterpunch
7 p.m., $12-$15. Fubar, 3108 Locust St, St. Louis, 314-289-9050.
By Jonah Bayer
Think you're old school? Try being in Agent Orange, the proto-punk surf trio best known for its early-'80s anthem "Bloodstains." Although the Fullerton, California, punk act has gone through several member changes since its inception in 1979 — bassist Steve Soto notably left in the '80s to form the Adolescents — the band continues to play the best songs that the Dead Kennedys never wrote. But don't take our word for it; dig out that dusty LP of Living in Darkness and judge for yourself.

Gov't Mule w/ ZZ Top
6 p.m., $20. Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, I-70 & Earth City Expwy., Maryland Heights, 314-298-9944.
By Roy Kasten
Gov't Mule was the first jam band, and maybe it should have been the last one. What started out as an Allman Brothers spinoff has become a potent and durable boogie-rock institution — one undergirded by Warren Haynes' instantly identifiable sustained guitar and dirty-white-boy-with-the-blues vocal exertions. As a songwriter, Haynes has rarely shown the classic touch of his friends in the Dead or the Allmans or of his blues and Southern rock idols. However, backed by original (and vastly underrated) drummer Matt Abts, demonic organ player Danny Louis and Jorgen Carlsson on bass, Gov't Mule defines what's best about the jam style: It's instrumentally adventurous but never proggy and compulsively groovy but never mindless. 


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