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Current Profile

Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Continues through March 17

Once reserved for the wealthy and the social elite, portraiture has been democratized down to the informal level of the selfie. Freed from its staid origins, the modern portrait can be heroic representation, transgressive, humorous or an act of wish fulfillment. Current Profile, the new exhibition at the Craft Alliance Center of Art + Design (6640 Delmar Boulevard, University City; www.craftalliance.org), explores contemporary portraiture in all media. The show features everything from Richard Wehrs' sculpted bust of an alien warrior to Cayce Zavaglia's embroidered image of a young woman in pigtails, and all points in between. Current Profile opens with a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, January 11. The exhibition remains up through March 17. free admission

Steinberg Skating Rink

Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-11 p.m. and Mondays-Thursdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through Feb. 25

Ice skating and hot cocoa go together like Christmas and carols. Every year, Steinberg Skating Rink in Forest Park (www.steinbergskatingrink.com) is open from early November to late February, providing the Midwest's largest outdoor rink for the low price of $7 a day. Your $7 is good for the whole day, from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Skate rental is another $7, which is a steal — but just because it's so affordable doesn't mean you have to bring the family. If you're tired of the in-laws, their kids or just want to get out of the house, Steinberg is there for you. Nothing clears the head like a brisk skating session and hot cocoa by an outdoor fire. $7

Steinberg Skating Rink (map)
400 Jefferson Drive
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-367-7465 or 314-361-0613
Steinberg Skating Rink

Printing Abstraction

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through March 31

Abstract art is a term that includes a wide variety of media: monochromatic color fields, hard-edged abstraction and its flat colors, and the sharply defined edges and optical illusions inherent in op-art's geometric forms. What links all of these styles together is that they are divorced from the traditional representation of physical objects. For its new exhibition Printing Abstraction, the Saint Louis Art Museum draws from its own holdings of abstract art created by printmakers. The show is something of an expansion of the museum's ongoing main exhibition, Graphic Revolution: American Prints 1960 to Now, in that it offers more examples of the printmakers' art and the key role it's played in the promulgation of abstract art. Printing Abstraction is on display from Tuesday through Sunday (November 30 to March 31) in galleries 234 and 235 of the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Admission is free. free admission

Oslo

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through March 3

Back in the days before Twitter, diplomacy was a face-to-face business. Representatives from two nations or groups would meet together to discuss the issue at hand like adults and try to come to some sort of agreeable compromise. In the early 1990s, these quaint methods enabled leaders of the Palestine Liberation Organization and Israeli government to meet, however reluctantly. Norwegian diplomat Mona Juul and her husband Terje Rød-Larsen used back-channel relationships to very quietly establish connections with Israeli Prime Minister Yitzahk Rabin and PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat, and encouraged them to sit down and talk about building a road to peace. In a room supplied with food and drink, the leaders of two warring parties engaged with one another as people and found the spark of a human connection. J.T. Rogers' Tony Award-winning play Oslo dramatizes those meetings and that fleeting moment when two enemies shook hands and agreed to make peace. The Repertory Theatre St. Louis presents Oslo Tuesday through Sunday (February 8 to March 3) at the Loretto-Hilton Center (130 Edgar Road; www.repstl.org). Tickets are $19 to $92. $19-$92

Ann Metzger National Biennial Exhibition

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through Feb. 23

The Ann Metzger National Biennial Exhibition is the St. Louis Artists Guild's commitment to contemporary art made real. Metzger was a longtime member of the Artists Guild, and she bequeathed money to the institution to fund cash prizes for working artists. The exhibition features art in all media by more than 50 artists from across the country. This year's show opens with a free reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, January 11, at the St. Louis Artists Guild (12 North Jackson Avenue, Clayton; www.stlouisartistsguild.org), and includes abstract art, figurative painting, sculpture and digital media. The Biennial remains on display through February 23. free admission

St. Louis Artists' Guild (map)
12 N Jackson Ave
Clayton
phone 314-727-6266
Ann Metzger National Biennial Exhibition

Muny Memories: 100 Years on Stage

Through June 2

The Muny is just about to open its landmark 100th season, and its neighbor, the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBalivere Avenue; www.mohistory.org), celebrates the occasion with an exhibit dedicated to the history of America's largest outdoor theater. Muny Memories: 100 Years on Stage features exhibits that explain the founding of the theater, display favorite memories from stars and staff, and give a look back stage to see how the dedicated technical crew creates and rigs all those sets and lights. You can also take a look at programs from the Muny's long, storied past. Muny Memories opens on Saturday, June 9, and remains on display daily through June 2, 2019. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
Muny Memories: 100 Years on Stage

Panoramas of the City

Through March 24

In a year in which the Missouri History Museum exhibition team has given us the stories of St. Louis' greatest civil rights freedom fighters and returned us to the glory days of Route 66, it would take something truly spectacular for the museum to outdo itself — and yet somehow it's done just that. The museum's new exhibition, Panoramas of the City, is as close to time travel as you can get without involving Morlocks. The show comprises seven floor-to-ceiling size images of scenes such as Charles Lindbergh speaking to a crowd of 100,000 people on Art Hill at his "welcome home" party and a 1920 march on Olive Street by the League of Women Voters. These massive photographs are joined by props and interactive media displays that give viewers a better understanding of the historical context of each scene. More than 60 panoramas of various sizes round out the exhibit, which will be on display from September 2 to March 24, 2019, at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; www.mohistory.org). free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
Panoramas of the City

Christine Corday: Relative Points

Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through April 21

Space is deep, to quote Hawkwind, and yet scientists believe all living creatures on Earth contain stellar elements within their genetic makeup. Artist Christine Corday explores this union of humans and the stars in her new exhibition Relative Points, which was commissioned by the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis. Eleven of Corday's large sculptural forms, which are each made of more than 10,000 pounds of elemental metals and metalloid grit, will be arranged within the museum in a pattern of Corday's choosing. The sculptures, which resemble slightly squashed black marshmallows more than four feet high, are intended to be touched; they're essentially the same base elements as humans, after all. During the course of the exhibit, the shapes will change gradually from repeated contact and the inexorable force of universal gravitational attraction. You'll have your first opportunity to get close and personal with Corday's work at the opening reception, which takes place from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, January 18, at Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org). Christine Corday: Relative Points remains fixed in space through April 21. free admission

Milk Like Sugar

Sundays, 3 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. and Wednesdays, Thursdays, 7 p.m. Continues through March 3

Annie Desmond is turning sixteen, and she and her friends plan to celebrate in a big way — tattoos may be involved. They're like many black teenagers, dreaming big but surrounded by little that offers hope of something better. Annie's mother works herself near to death to support them, but when Annie's friend Margie tells the group she's pregnant, they hatch a plan that's shortsighted at best. Kirsten Greenidge's play Milk Like Sugar has been praised for the poetry and honesty of its dialogue and its unflinching look at the future being created for black youth. The Black Rep presents Milk Like Sugar at 7 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday at Washington University's Hotchner Studio Theatre inside the Edison Center (6445 Forsyth Boulevard; www.theblackrep.org). Tickets are $15 to $40. $15-$40

Buy Tickets
Edison Theatre (map)
6445 Forsyth Blvd.
Clayton
phone 314-935-6543
Milk Like Sugar

Margaret & Eric

Wed., Feb. 27, 4-7 p.m.
phone 314-773-5565
lhammerstone@earthlink.net

Live Music is Better free

https://www.hammerstones.net
Hammerstone's (map)
2028 S. 9th St.
St. Louis - Soulard
phone 314-773-5565

Character Telephone Exhibit

Wednesdays-Sundays, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Continues through March 31
phone 314-416-8004
jbtelmuseum@yahoo.com

@ Jefferson Barracks Telephone Museum, 12 Hancock Ave, St. Louis MO 63125
Kermit, Star Wars, Gumby, Beetle Bailey, Trains, Planes and Automobiles – these are some of the telephones you’ll see at the Jefferson Barracks Telephone Museum. Housed in a restored 1896 building, the history museum also features an extensive collection of telephones manufactured from the early 1900s through the 2000s, hundreds of pieces of telephone-related equipment, memorabilia from 1880s through the 2000s and military telephones from WWII through the Vietnam War. The museum has many hands-on, how-things-work exhibits which were created to inspire an interest in engineering and history. Adults $5, Seniors $4, Children Ages 5-12 $3

http://www.jbtelmuseum.org

Finding Common Ground: The Photography of Oraien Catledge and Jay Stock

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through March 16
phone 314-535-1999
,

The International Photography Hall of Fame and Museum is pleased to present two exhibitions presenting the photographs of Oraien Catledge and Jay Stock. Both were outsiders to the communities they engaged with. One delved almost exclusively in a single impoverished, overlooked city neighborhood examining the lives of those that lived on the margins of society. The other traveled the world creating photographic essays of the people he met and their varied customs and traditions. Together they shared a profound respect and insistent fascination for the people they photographed. Adults $10 Students, Seniors $5, Children under 5 Free

http://iphf.org/exhibitions/oraien-catledge-cabbagetown/

St. Louis, A Musical Gateway: The Balkans, India, and Mexico

Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m., Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and Tuesdays, 12-8 p.m. Continues through April 13
phone 314-533-9900
marketing@thesheldon.org

The first in a series that celebrates St. Louis' immigrant communities, this exhibit features rare and beautiful instruments drawn from The Sheldon's Hartenberger World Music Collection and from the collection of Dr. Aurelia and Jeffrey Hartenberger from India, Mexico and the Balkan region. Highlights include a 3,000-year-old Olmec whistle and an ornate "Bajo Quinto" from Mexico, a Croatian Tamburitza Berda, an ancient Greek terra cotta whistle and a 12th-century Hindu Vamavarta conch horn from India. The exhibition is curated by Dr. Aurelia Hartenberger. Free

https://www.thesheldon.org/current-exhibits.php
Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900

Wallace Herndon Smith: Paintings and Drawings

Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m., Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and Fridays, 12-8 p.m. Continues through April 13
phone 314-533-9900
marketing@thesheldon.org

Born in 1901, Wallace Herndon Smith was a traditional painter who absorbed the visual language of artists like Pierre Bonnard, Henri Matisse and Edward Hopper. In the late 1930s, his work gained attention from important American artists like Hopper, Walt Kuhn and Peggy Bacon. He traveled extensively to Europe, Mexico and America's East Coast, and had a summer residence and studio in Harbor Springs, Michigan, subjects of which are found in several works in the exhibit. His works have been exhibited widely including in New York at the Museum of Modern Art and in Philadelphia, St. Louis and other cities. Free

https://www.thesheldon.org/current-exhibits.php
Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900

Evan and Stacey Smith: Liminal Spaces

Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m., Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and Tuesdays, 12-8 p.m. Continues through April 13
phone 314-533-9900
marketing@thesheldon.org

Liminal Spaces is a collection of architectural sculptures by husband-and-wife team Evan and Stacey Smith. Offering immersive and meditative experiences, the sculptures either directly or indirectly mimic artistic and religious spaces. Carefully constructed and lit with programmable LED lighting, the works draw the viewer into the imaginary environments they create. Free

https://www.thesheldon.org/current-exhibits.php
Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900
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