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Theater Search – Staff Pick

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Alabama Story

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through Jan. 27

What is it about books that makes some people so afraid? Senator E.W. Higgins is up in arms about Garth Williams' new book The Rabbits' Wedding, a children's story about two rabbits who marry. Higgins' main objection is that one of the rabbits is white and the other is black, and in Alabama in 1959, even the hint of miscegenation — and in a children's book, no less — is cause for alarm. Higgins demands it be removed from all Alabama libraries. One librarian, Emily Wheelock Reed, refuses to pull it. Books, and the ideas with their pages, are worth fighting for, Reed argues. Kenneth Jones' play Alabama Story is based on a true story. Williams, the illustrator of Stuart Little and the Little House on the Prairie books, had no idea his picture book about a rabbit wedding would spark a political fight that threatened the well-being of an entire state. The Repertory Theatre St. Louis presents Alabama Story to open the second half of its season. Performances are Tuesday through Sunday (January 2 to 27) at the Loretto-Hilton Center (130 Edgar Road; www.repstl.org). Tickets are $19 to $92. $19-$92

The Wolves

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through Feb. 3

Sarah DeLappe's play The Wolves will appear to be familiar territory for many parents in the Repertory Theatre St. Louis' audience. In it a team of teenage girls stretch before an indoor soccer game. But the only parent nearby is the team coach, who is too hungover to pay much attention to his athletes, and the girls are free to speak honestly to each other, and about each other. As the season progresses, a new teammate, growing resentments, discussions of various boyfriends and the flashes of unexpected cruelty reveal that behind their confidence on the field, each of them is still a young woman finding her way toward adulthood. The Repertory Theatre St. Louis presents The Wolves Tuesday through Sunday (January 18 to February 3) at the Loretto-Hilton Center (130 Edgar Road; www.repstl.org). Tickets are $46 to $71. $46-$71

Canfield Drive

Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., Sundays, 3 p.m. and Wednesdays, Thursdays, 7 p.m. Continues through Jan. 27

The civic protests following the killing of Michael Brown by a police officer will enter St. Louis history as an event as momentous as the Jefferson Bank Protests of the 1960s and the Dred Scott trial of the 1850s. But in the days after Brown's death, a long view of history wasn't possible. As international media crowded into Ferguson and tried to make sense of the region's troubled history with race, equal opportunity and community policing, it felt as if the facts changed daily. It's this tangle of news personalities and deadlines that informs Kristen Adele Calhoun and Michael Thomas Walker's new play, Canfield Drive. Two reporters with very different views of the story try to piece together the truth about what happened on a hot August day on a suburban street, while also trying to keep their own pasts from becoming part of the narrative. Calhoun and Thomas have spent four years working on the script with the St. Louis Black Repertory Company, which commissioned the play alongside the National Performance Network and 651 Arts. Canfield Drive is informed by first-person interviews with people from the metro area and from around the world, and it seeks to start conversations about race, culture, history, privilege and healing. The Black Rep presents the world-premiere production of Canfield Drive at Washington University's Edison Theatre (6445 Forsyth Boulevard; www.theblackrep.org). Performances are at 7 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday (January 9 to 27), and tickets are $15 to $45. $15-$45

Buy Tickets
Edison Theatre (map)
6445 Forsyth Blvd.
Clayton
phone 314-935-6543
Canfield Drive

Love, Linda

Thursdays, 7:30 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. and Sundays, 3 p.m. Continues through Jan. 27

Cole Porter was a tough man to stay married to; he liked glamorous parties, the nightlife and being the center of attention. His homosexuality could have been another dealbreaker, but not for Linda Lee Thomas. The Southern heiress had already had one rough marriage when she met Porter, and the two got along so well that they soon married. Despite their sexual incompatibility, they shared a genuine affection, and Porter had no greater champion than his loving wife. Stevie Holland and Gary William Friedman's one-woman musical Love, Linda recounts the story of Mrs. Cole Porter woven through innovative arrangements of her husband's most beloved songs. Max & Louie Productions presents Love, Linda at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday (January 17 to 27) at the Marcelle Theater (3310 Samuel Shepard Drive; www.maxandlouie.com). Tickets are $40 to $45. $40-$45

Marcelle Theater (map)
3310 Samuel Shepard Dr
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-0367
Love, Linda
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