Events starting Apr. 6 in St. Louis

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How We See: Materiality and Color

Through June 29, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.


Humans can perceive a wide palette of colors, but we don't see as many hues as nature contains. The limitations of human vision are stretched in the Laumeier Sculpture Park's new exhibition How We See: Materiality and Color. Six artists who combine modern art practices with a keen observation of the natural world explore the possibilities of color manipulation and perception. Claire Ashley's specially commissioned, large-scale inflatable Ruddy Udder Dance is painted in neon colors. Volunteers will get inside it and perform a series of choreographed routines that allow you to see how its various shades change with movement and daylight. Ann Lindberg's graphite-and-colored-pencil piece as though air could turn to honey features a closely packed array of thin lines of pure pigment that become subtly darker toward the bottom. From a distance those tints blend and fade, and the piece appears to have a more uniform golden hue. How We See opens with a free reception at 11 a.m. Saturday, March 2, at Laumeier's Aronson Fine Arts Center (12580 Rott Road, Sunset Hill; www.laumeier.org). The exhibit continues through June 29, and admission is free. 314-615-5278

Striking Power: Iconoclasm in Ancient Egypt

Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 11
Pulitzer Arts Foundation 3716 Washington Blvd., St. Louis St. Louis - Grand Center


In his sonnet "Ozymandias," Percy Bysshe Shelley describes the legs of an epic statue in the desert wastelands, its ruined face lying "half sunk" in the sand. The inscription on the pedestal reads, "My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings; Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!" The poem is a meditation on time wearing away the memory of even the mightiest, and a reminder that death means forgetfulness. In truth, it may have been Ozymandias' successor who destroyed the statue upon assuming the title of pharaoh. Statues and memorial inscriptions held ritual power for the Egyptians, and it behooved the new ruler to sweep away all remnant of his or her predecessor. In the Pulitzer Arts Foundation's (3716 Washington Boulevard; www.pulitzerarts.org) new exhibition, Striking Power: Iconoclasm in Ancient Egypt, the legacies of the pharaohs Hatshepsut and Akhenaten are examined through almost 40 historical objects that are both defaced and whole. Memory and visual culture are intertwined, and the destruction of the latter can easily erase the former. Striking Power opens with a free reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, March 22. The work remains on display through August 11. 314-754-1850

The Dinner Detective Murder Mystery Dinner Show

Saturdays, 6-9 p.m. Continues through June 26
Hilton St. Louis Frontenac 1335 S. Lindbergh Blvd., Frontenac Frontenac

Buy Tickets$59.95


1335 S Lindbergh Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63131
America's largest interactive comedy murder mystery dinner show! Solve a hilarious crime while you feast on a fantastic dinner. Just beware! The killer is hiding somewhere in the room, and you may find yourself as a Prime Suspect! The Dinner Detective Murder Mystery Dinner Show performs weekly. We also offer private events & shows that are customized to your group with roles for your group members to play. Join us for a one-of-a-kind public or private event that your guests will talk about for months! 866-496-0535

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