Events Today in St. Louis

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Jaws: The Parody

Sun., July 21, 8 p.m., Mon., July 22, 2 p.m., Wed., July 24, 8 p.m., Thu., July 25, 8 p.m., Fri., July 26, 8 & 10:30 p.m. and Sat., July 27, 8 & 10:30 p.m.
Regional Arts Commission 6128 Delmar Blvd., University City Delmar/ The Loop


Steven Spielberg's Jaws was the first of the huge summer blockbusters, which is why it's perfect for the intentionally low-budget paws of Magic Smoking Monkey. The theater company specializes in recreating (sorta) a film live on stage in about 60 minutes. The bigger the original's special effects budget, the funnier the Magic Smoking Monkey version becomes, thanks to cardboard sets, dollar-store props and the actors' wild-eyed willingness to try anything for a laugh. Performances of Jaws: The Parody are at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday (July 19 to 21), 8 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday (July 24 and 25) and at 8:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday (July 26 to 27). The Regional Arts Commission (6128 Delmar Boulevard; www.stlshakespeare.org) stands in for the beach town of Amity Island, and tickets are $10 to $15. 314-863-5811

Poetics of the Everyday: Amateur Photography 1890-1970

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 25


Portable cameras democratized photography. Once anybody could carry a camera with them, photography became a hobby as well as an art. Poetics of the Everyday: Amateur Photography 1890-1970, the new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), features 110 works by unknown moms and dads. They show children, landscapes, family gatherings and of course the family dog, with often unintentional effects such as the dreaded double exposure. Despite being made by strangers, the images of family vacations and candid shots have a familiarity that makes them universal. Poetics of the Everyday is on display in galleries 234 and 235 from Friday, April 26, to August 25. Admission is free. 314-721-0072

Printing the Pastoral: Visions of the Countryside in 18th-Century Europe

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 1


The consumers of middle- and upper-class society in the eighteenth century developed a passion for rural scenes of traditional country life, just as the introduction of copperplate printing to the textile industry made it possible to produce fabrics with intricately detailed scenes printed upon them. Textile factories began churning out yards of fabric with shepherds, village fêtes and strolling couples for a market that could afford to buy them as furniture coverings, bedding and curtains. Printing the Pastoral: Visions of the Countryside in 18th-Century Europe, an exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum, includes numerous examples of the craft, several of which have never before been shown at the museum. The centerpiece of the exhibit is a reconstructed bed with printed bedding and curtains. Printing the Pastoral continues through December 1 in gallery 100 at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Admission is free. 314-721-0072

Golf the Galleries

Sundays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Saturdays, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. and Mondays-Fridays, 12-8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 11
The Sheldon 3648 Washington Blvd., St. Louis St. Louis - Grand Center

Buy Tickets$6-$10 to play, free for spectators


Miniature golf, that salve for many a dull summer night, returns to the Sheldon Galleries (3648 Washington Boulevard; www.thesheldon.org) this summer, with creative and challenging holes designed by artists. The indoor golf course will fill the Sheldon's second floor, providing a welcome respite from the summer heat.

Golf the Galleries officially opens Saturday, June 1, with nine all-new holes. Justin King, creator of last year's recycled cardboard fantasia Serengeti Park, will be back with a new hole that's again made of old cardboard. King's Kraken's Cove has a giant octopus and other sea life; players must thread their ball through the creature's tentacles to sink their putt. Master puppeteer and theater scene designer Ryan Marshall will offer The Little Foxes, a scaled-down version of the Fox Theatre, starring marionette versions of Louis Laclede and a skulk of tiny foxes. And Constance Vale, architectural director of the Factory of Smoke and Mirrors, will offer The Mat, the Tapestry and the Magic Carpet, which inverts the golf course. Carpeted surfaces travel up the wall and are suspended above the floor, so that the playing surface becomes the obstacle.

Golf the Galleries will be open from noon to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, June 1 to August 11. The last tee time is one hour prior to closing.

It's free to walk through the course, and $6 to $10 to play. Tee times are first come, first served. Group rates and private rentals are also available; call 314-533-9900.

314-533-9900

Grease

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through Aug. 18
Robert G. Reim Theatre 111 S. Geyer Road, Kirkwood Kirkwood


The Jim Jacobs/Warren Casey musical Grease is a loving tribute to the music of the 1950s and the golden age of teenage hijinks. The T-Birds are all about girls, cars and some light troublemaking. The Pink Ladies are their gals of choice, but that changes for de facto leader Danny Zuko when his summer crush, Sandy, enrolls in Rydell High with him. Danny pretended to be sophisticated and mature with Sandy, and the T-Birds aren't. Will Danny change to win back Sandy? The T-Birds hope not, but stranger things have happened. Stages St. Louis presents Grease Tuesday through Sunday (July 19 to August 18) at the Robert G. Reim Theatre (111 South Geyer Road; www.stagesstlouis.org). Tickets are $25 to $65.

Paul Gauguin: The Art of Invention

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through Sept. 15


While Paul Gauguin is perhaps best known for his lush paintings of Tahiti, he was an inveterate experimenter (as most artists are). Gauguin's prodigious output in all media is showcased in the new exhibition at Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), Paul Gauguin: The Art of Invention. Built around a loan of 55 pieces by Danish institution Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, The Art of Invention includes examples of Gauguin's early Impressionist works, woodcarvings, prints, sculptures and writings. It includes a rare edition of the artist's manuscript Modern Thought and Catholicism, which was gifted to the museum by actor and art collector Vincent Price. The Art of Invention is on display in the main exhibition gallery Tuesday through Sunday (July 21 to September 15). Admission is $6 to $15, and free on Fridays. 314-721-0072

Biennial Faculty Exhibition

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through Aug. 18
Craft Alliance Center of Art + Design 6640 Delmar Blvd., University City Delmar/ The Loop


Several generations of children have gained valuable hands-on experience with art at the Craft Alliance. From ceramics to hot glass to textiles to comic book creation, untold numbers of kids have taken their first serious creative steps there. It is the Craft Alliance's teachers — artists all — who have made all of that possible. The Biennial Faculty Exhibition showcases the work of those educators, and it features a wealth of items from metalsmithing to painting. The Biennial opens with a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, July 12, at the Craft Alliance in the Delmar Loop (6640 Delmar Boulevard; www.craftalliance.org). The gallery is open Tuesday through Sunday, and the exhibit continues through August 18. 314-725-1177

Striking Power: Iconoclasm in Ancient Egypt

Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 11
Pulitzer Arts Foundation 3716 Washington Blvd., St. Louis St. Louis - Grand Center


In his sonnet "Ozymandias," Percy Bysshe Shelley describes the legs of an epic statue in the desert wastelands, its ruined face lying "half sunk" in the sand. The inscription on the pedestal reads, "My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings; Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!" The poem is a meditation on time wearing away the memory of even the mightiest, and a reminder that death means forgetfulness. In truth, it may have been Ozymandias' successor who destroyed the statue upon assuming the title of pharaoh. Statues and memorial inscriptions held ritual power for the Egyptians, and it behooved the new ruler to sweep away all remnant of his or her predecessor. In the Pulitzer Arts Foundation's (3716 Washington Boulevard; www.pulitzerarts.org) new exhibition, Striking Power: Iconoclasm in Ancient Egypt, the legacies of the pharaohs Hatshepsut and Akhenaten are examined through almost 40 historical objects that are both defaced and whole. Memory and visual culture are intertwined, and the destruction of the latter can easily erase the former. Striking Power opens with a free reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, March 22. The work remains on display through August 11. 314-754-1850

Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis' Summer Exhibitions

Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 18


The Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis' summer exhibitions open at 7 p.m. Friday, May 17, and there are some heavy hitters involved. Lawrence Abu Hamdan is a finalist for this year's Turner Prize for his exhibition Earwitness Theatre (which CAM co-commissioned with several other institutions), which incorporates the artist's audio analysis of Saydnaya prison in Syria, site of numerous humanitarian abuses, a soundbooth and groups of objects Abu Hamdan uses as mnemonic devices to facilitate reenactments of crimes. Photographer Paul Mgapi Sepuya receives his first major museum survey thanks to CAM. Sepuya's images jumble and reorder the human body, while also revealing the mechanics of photography. Cameras are often a central figure in his work, while tripods, backdrops and lighting show up in his collages. Avoiding digital manipulation, Sepuya's work is about the importance of touch and contact, both between his subjects and his materials. Both shows remain on display at CAM (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org) through August 18, and admission is free. 314-535-4660

LaBute New Theater Festival

Sundays, 3 p.m. and Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through July 28
Gaslight Theater 358 N. Boyle Ave., St. Louis St. Louis - Central West End


The seventh edition of the LaBute New Theater Festival returns for a four-week run, courtesy of St. Louis Actors' Studio. The celebration of new, short theatrical works is one of the more popular tickets in town, as it presents challenging, thoughtful plays to a discerning audience. As always, the eponymous playwright contributes a new piece ("Great Negro Works of Art"), which will be performed at every show. This year's six other finalists are performed in two batches, with three presented the first two weeks of the run and the other three closing out the festival's final two weeks. Performances are at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday (July 5 to 28) at the Gaslight Theater (358 North Boyle Avenue; www.stlas.org). Tickets are $30 to $35.

LaBute New Theater Festival, Set II

Sundays, 3 p.m. and Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through July 28
Gaslight Theater 358 N. Boyle Ave., St. Louis St. Louis - Central West End


The first half of this year's LaBute New Theater Festival was absolutely outstanding. Can the second set of plays top it? There's only one way to find out. Neil LaBute's funny and scathing "Great Negro Works of Art" closes this half of the fest, which also includes Richard Curtis' "Predilections," Joseph Krawczyk's "Henrietta" and "Sisyphus and Icarus a Love story" by William Ivor Fawkes. All four plays are performed and directed by working St. Louis actors. The second half of LaBute fest runs 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and at 3 p.m. Sunday (July 19 to 28) at the Gaslight Theater (358 North Boyle Avenue; www.stlas.org). Tickets are $30 to $35.

Footloose the Musical

Through July 24, 8:15 p.m.
The Muny Forest Park, St. Louis St. Louis - Forest Park


All new kid in town Ren McCormack wants to do is dance, but that's not allowed in the small town of Bomont, thanks to the Reverend Moore. Moore's daughter, Ariel, is intrigued by this brash hoofer, but her loutish boyfriend Chuck likes that even less than her father does. What's a kid from the big city have to do to break free? Footloose the Musical is based on the teen flick from the 1980s, and features several of the big hits from the film ("Footloose," "Holdin' Out for a Hero," "Let's Hear it for the Boy"). The Muny presents Footloose at 8:15 p.m. Thursday through Wednesday (July 18 to 24) at the Muny in Forest Park (www.muny.org). Tickets are $15 to $105. 314-361-1900

BrainWorks: The Theatre of Neuroscience

Sun., July 21, 2 p.m.
Loretto-Hilton Center 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves Webster Groves

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BrainWorks, a theatrical performance and future Nine PBS television series, explores the wonders of the human brain by dramatizing real-life neurological cases to reveal the science behind brain diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, epilepsy, brain tumors and stroke. This fascinating production is a collaboration between Washington University neurosurgeons Eric C. Leuthardt, MD, and Albert H. Kim, MD, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Nine Network of Public Media.

Seen Around Our City

Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 29
Green Door Art Gallery 21 N. Gore Ave., Webster Groves Webster Groves

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Green Door art gallery presents “Seen Around Our City”. The Reception is Friday, July 12  from 5-8 pm is free and open to the public. Featuring encaustic scenes of St. Louis by Leah Merriman, mixed media mandalas by Mira Patel, oil paintings by Michael Anderson, and whimsical animal paintings by Alison Bozarth. Available from July 1 through August 29, 2019 along with 30 other artists. 21 N. Gore in Old Webster Groves in the historical Heritage Building.  Hours are Wednesday thru Sunday 10:00 am to 5:00 pm- Closed Monday and Tuesday   www.Greendoorartgallery.com (314) 402-1959 314-402-1959

Paul Gauguin: The Art of Invention

July 21-Sept. 15, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.


Journey through the fascinating progression of Paul Gauguin’s artistic career, from his early Impressionist paintings to his iconic works from Brittany and Tahiti to his exploration of ceramics and sculpture. This exceptional display of ninety artworks, many of which have never before been seen in St. Louis, unveils Gauguin’s experimental and innovative artistic nature. The exhibition is presented in partnership with the distinguished Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek in Copenhagen. 314.721.0072

Balinese Art

Through Sept. 22, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.


Balinese Art features a selection of rich and varied works of art produced in Bali, Indonesia during the 20th century. Bali’s visual and performing arts reflect the Hindu religious beliefs of its people that are distinct from the predominantly Islamic culture found elsewhere in Indonesia. Artists drew inspiration from nature, village life, and narratives from Hindu epics and local tales. The installation includes eight paintings and two ceremonial masks used for the central figures in the giant puppet dance known as Barong Landung, which may still be experienced today. Gallery 225 is devoted to the periodic rotation of Asian art 314.721.0072

Vaughn T. Davis, Jr.: Ascending Forms

Through Sept. 1, 9 a.m.-9 p.m.
The Millstone Gallery at COCA 524 Trinity Ave., St. Louis University City


In a world fascinated and obsessed with height, flight, and constant progress, St. Louis artist Vaughn T. Davis, Jr. responds by calling attention to the idea, mechanics and feeling of ascension. For his first site-specific installation in the city, Davis has created a collection of vibrant geometric forms characterized by his signature cut out, frayed, ripped, shredded and sliced surface treatments of flatly pigmented and unprimed large-scale canvases. Opening reception from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Friday, June 7. 314-725-6555

Grease

Saturdays, 4-6 p.m., Tuesdays-Saturdays, 8-10 p.m., Sundays, 7:30-9:30 p.m. and Thursdays, Sundays, 2-4 p.m. Continues through Aug. 18
Robert G. Reim Theatre 111 S. Geyer Road, Kirkwood Kirkwood

Buy Tickets$25 - $65


Welcome to Rydell High where Danny Zuko rules the school and, secretly, Sandy Dumbrowski’s heart after a summer fling ends in feelings that could last forever. Bursting with explosive energy, GREASE blends an irresistible mix of adolescent angst and electrifying All-American teen spirit as the 1950s come to life onstage in this pop-culture phenomenon. Bust out your poodle skirts and leather jackets as you hand-jive along to a roster of jukebox hits including “Hopelessly Devoted To You,” “Greased Lightnin’,” “You’re The One That I Want,” and “We Go Together.” Grease is a high octane rock ‘n roll party! 314-821-2407

LaBute New Theater Festival

Through July 28, 8 p.m.
Gaslight Theater 358 N. Boyle Ave., St. Louis St. Louis - Central West End

Buy from Ticketmaster30-35


St. Louis Actors’ Studio will produce the 7th “LaBute New Theater Festival". The Theater Festival will run at the Gaslight Theater, 358 North Boyle, home to St. Louis Actors’ Studio. Professional and High School Submissions were accepted October through December 2018. To be considered entries had to have no more than four characters, and be crafted specifically to exploit our intimate performance space (18' x 18' stage). Changes in scenery or setting should be achievable in a few seconds and with few major set moves. Our focus is on fundamental dramaturgy: plot, character, theme. Professional, new, previously unproduced one act 314-458-2978

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