Events starting Aug. 2 in St. Louis

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Printing the Pastoral: Visions of the Countryside in 18th-Century Europe

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 1


The consumers of middle- and upper-class society in the eighteenth century developed a passion for rural scenes of traditional country life, just as the introduction of copperplate printing to the textile industry made it possible to produce fabrics with intricately detailed scenes printed upon them. Textile factories began churning out yards of fabric with shepherds, village fêtes and strolling couples for a market that could afford to buy them as furniture coverings, bedding and curtains. Printing the Pastoral: Visions of the Countryside in 18th-Century Europe, an exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum, includes numerous examples of the craft, several of which have never before been shown at the museum. The centerpiece of the exhibit is a reconstructed bed with printed bedding and curtains. Printing the Pastoral continues through December 1 in gallery 100 at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Admission is free. 314-721-0072

Carlos Zamora: cART

Through Dec. 22


Art is something to be appreciated, and St. Louis-based illustrator/graphic designer Carlos Zamora's cART exhibition at Laumeier Sculpture Park is one of those examples. Zamora transformed three golf carts into kinetic sculptures by installing his oversized paper boat sculptures on top and wrapping the bodies with printed vinyl slogans. A fourth large paper boat sculpture will be placed in a creek on the Laumeier grounds. The Cuban native drew inspiration for the project from his heritage, specifically the song "Baraquio de papel" — "Little Paper Boat" — as well as Cuban car culture, nursery rhymes and politics.

Carlos Zamora: cART opens with a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, July 25, at Laumeier Sculpture Park (12580 Rott Road; www.laumeier.org). The following night a Havana Night celebration takes place in the park's Aronson Fine Arts Center from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., with mojitos, snacks, "Casino" dance lessons and a screenprinted poster station. Tickets are $25, but admission to the park and Zamora's boat sculptures is free. The exhibition continues through December 22, and the park is open daily from 8 a.m. to 30 minutes past sunset.

314-615-5278

Balinese Art

Through Sept. 22, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.


Balinese Art features a selection of rich and varied works of art produced in Bali, Indonesia during the 20th century. Bali’s visual and performing arts reflect the Hindu religious beliefs of its people that are distinct from the predominantly Islamic culture found elsewhere in Indonesia. Artists drew inspiration from nature, village life, and narratives from Hindu epics and local tales. The installation includes eight paintings and two ceremonial masks used for the central figures in the giant puppet dance known as Barong Landung, which may still be experienced today. Gallery 225 is devoted to the periodic rotation of Asian art 314.721.0072

Zombie Love Murder Mystery Dinner Theater

Fridays, Saturdays, 7-10 p.m. Continues through Nov. 2


Join us and enjoy an exciting evening of murder, mystery and mayhem at the most dangerous comedy dinner theater show in town. Dig into a fantastic three-course dinner at the Famously Haunted Lemp Mansion and figure out who-dun-it during Zombie Love! Parts will be passed out at the door and guests can participate as much or as little as they would like to. Seats are just $52.95 per person and include a delicious 3-course dinner. Call 314-664-8024 for more details and to make your reservations. Learn more about Jest Murder Mystery Company jestmurdermystery.com/st-louis-mo/ 314-664-8024

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