Events starting Oct. 1 in St. Louis

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Printing the Pastoral: Visions of the Countryside in 18th-Century Europe

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 1


The consumers of middle- and upper-class society in the eighteenth century developed a passion for rural scenes of traditional country life, just as the introduction of copperplate printing to the textile industry made it possible to produce fabrics with intricately detailed scenes printed upon them. Textile factories began churning out yards of fabric with shepherds, village fêtes and strolling couples for a market that could afford to buy them as furniture coverings, bedding and curtains. Printing the Pastoral: Visions of the Countryside in 18th-Century Europe, an exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum, includes numerous examples of the craft, several of which have never before been shown at the museum. The centerpiece of the exhibit is a reconstructed bed with printed bedding and curtains. Printing the Pastoral continues through December 1 in gallery 100 at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Admission is free. 314-721-0072

Sam Falls: Conception

Through Dec. 22, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.


Sam Falls' artworks are inspired by, and at least in part created by, nature. For his exhibition at Laumeier Sculpture Park, Falls laid a canvas covered with dry pigments on ground in the park's woodland. Left there for several days, the dew, whatever rain fell and the sunlight that passed through the leaves overhead and onto the canvas made a record of the local flora. In addition to his large-scale nature paintings, Falls has also mosaicked a pair of steel I-beams with tiles featuring native plants grown especially by Laumeier's master gardener at Falls' request. The finished beams are placed standing upright in the forest, reflecting and refracting the natural landscape that surrounds them. Sam Falls: Conception opens with a free public reception from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, August 24, at the Aronson Fine Arts Center in Laumeier Sculpture Park (12580 Rott Road, Sunset Hills; www.laumeier.org). Falls' work remains on display through December 22. 314-615-5278

The Shape Of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through March 22


The Thelma and Bert Ollie Memorial Collection of abstract art officially went on display Tuesday, September 17, at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). The collection was gifted to the museum in 2017 by New Jersey-based art collector Ronald Maurice Ollie and his wife, Monique McRipley Ollie, in honor of Ronald's parents. The elder Ollies often visited the Saint Louis Art Museum with their children, instilling a lifelong passion for art. Ronald and Monique Ollie together collected art for many years, particularly work by contemporary black artists. Among the treasures in the exhibit, The Shape Of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection, are important works such as Robert Blackburn's lithograph Faux Pas, Mary Lovelace O'Neal's City Lights and Frank Bowling's Fishes, Wishes and Star Apple Blue, which demonstrates Bowling's innovative painting technique. In all, 40 works are displayed in the show, which draws its title from a poem by Quincy Troupe. The St. Louis native was inspired by the artworks in the Ollie Collection and wrote "The Shape of Abstraction; for Ron Ollie" in response. Troupe's poem is included in the exhibit catalog. 314-721-0072

Carlos Zamora: cART

Through Dec. 22


Art is something to be appreciated, and St. Louis-based illustrator/graphic designer Carlos Zamora's cART exhibition at Laumeier Sculpture Park is one of those examples. Zamora transformed three golf carts into kinetic sculptures by installing his oversized paper boat sculptures on top and wrapping the bodies with printed vinyl slogans. A fourth large paper boat sculpture will be placed in a creek on the Laumeier grounds. The Cuban native drew inspiration for the project from his heritage, specifically the song "Baraquio de papel" — "Little Paper Boat" — as well as Cuban car culture, nursery rhymes and politics.

Carlos Zamora: cART opens with a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, July 25, at Laumeier Sculpture Park (12580 Rott Road; www.laumeier.org). The following night a Havana Night celebration takes place in the park's Aronson Fine Arts Center from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., with mojitos, snacks, "Casino" dance lessons and a screenprinted poster station. Tickets are $25, but admission to the park and Zamora's boat sculptures is free. The exhibition continues through December 22, and the park is open daily from 8 a.m. to 30 minutes past sunset.

314-615-5278

Pulitzer Prize Photographs and In Focus: St. Louis Post-Dispatch Photographs

Through Jan. 20, 2020
Missouri History Museum 5700 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis St. Louis - Forest Park

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Photographs are a key element of narrative storytelling, which is why it's so baffling that newspapers have deemed staff photographers an expendable luxury. You probably recognize many of the photographs that won Pulitzer Prizes, from Joe Rosenthal's shot Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, to Alan Diaz's memorable photo of U.S. federal agents seizing Elian Gonzalez, to St. Louis Post-Dispatch photographer Robert Cohen's 2014 image of a protestor throwing a tear-gas canister back at police while protesting the killing of Michael Brown. These photographs shock us, inspire feelings of pride and anger, and inform us, just as great written journalism does. The Newseum in Washington created a traveling exhibit of some of the most beautiful images to win the Pulitzer, and it's a show that will make its St. Louis debut on Saturday, August 3, at the Missouri History Museum (5700 Lindell Boulevard; www.mohistory.org). A second exhibition organized by the Missouri History Museum collected 75 photos of everyday life in St. Louis from the Post-Dispatch archives. Pulitzer Prize Photographs and In Focus: St. Louis Post-Dispatch Photographs remain on display through January 20, and admission is free. Parents are cautioned that some of the photographs are intense and may be too much for younger children. 314-746-4599

Howard Barry: Inertia

Tuesdays-Saturdays. Continues through Dec. 9
University of Missouri-St. Louis-Gallery 210 1 University Dr at Natural Bridge Road, Normandy North St. Louis County


Local artist Howard Barry has gained significant attention for his illustrations inspired by the Ferguson protests, but he's not just an activist artist. Barry's drawings are a form of physical therapy and mental therapy. He creates to relieve his frustration with the world and his own pain. Using ink, coffee and various computer programs for effects, Barry creates images of artists, musicians, civil rights pioneers and modern-day protesters, all with an eye for gesture and a gift for imbuing something of his subject's character. James Baldwin's luminous eyes reveal his hurt and anger with the country that rejected him for his blackness and homosexuality, while a barefoot child pushing his way through cotton emerges from a page of sheet music for Billie Holiday's "God Bless the Child." Inertia, an exhibition of Barry's artwork, opens with a free reception from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday, September 14, at Gallery 210 on the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus (1 University Drive at Natural Bridge Road; www. gallery210.umsl.edu). The show remains on display through December 9. 314-516-5976

The Shape of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection

Through March 8, 2020, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.


The Shape of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection presents 40 abstract paintings, drawings, and prints by acclaimed black artists drawn from and celebrating the transformative gift of the Thelma and Bert Ollie Memorial Art Collection. In 2017, Ollie and his wife Monique gifted the Museum with 81 abstract works in honor of his parents, a collection that has added depth and breadth to the Museum’s holdings of works by black artists. 314.721.0072

Thomas Sleet: Integration: Sacred Space

Tuesdays-Fridays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through Oct. 26
Bruno David Gallery 7513 Forsyth Blvd., Clayton Clayton


Since his youth, Thomas Sleet was always fascinated with nature. He tells stories about growing up in Kirkwood in the 60’s, playing in creeks and running around the neighborhood with his siblings. This fascination followed him well into his adult years, showing up in his sculptures, paintings, prints, and more. True to concepts consistent in past works, Integration: Scared Space continues with Sleet’s theme of intersecting the natural and the manufactured. His new wall mounted pieces highlight his carefully designed experiments with light, space, arrangement/placement, and the concept of the individual intersecting with the whole—the collective. 1.314.696-2377

Jill Downen: Here all is distance, there it was Breath

Tuesdays-Fridays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through Oct. 26
Bruno David Gallery 7513 Forsyth Blvd., Clayton Clayton


The show features Downen’s recent 8 X 10 inches drawings, executed in plaster, lapis lazuli and gold leaf — nearly forty works in all. This new body of work expands the artist’s renowned exploration of human spatial experience and the contemplative value of architectural form. Refined by decades of work with large scale sculptural installations, Downen’s drawings benefit not only from precise conceptual motivation, but also from her distilled palette and proven skill with plaster, lapis and gold leaf. Each piece depicts a moment in which new space emerges or where fragmented structure moves toward balance. 1.314.696-2377

Bea Nettles: Harvest of Memory

Tuesdays, 12-8 p.m., Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 28
The Sheldon 3648 Washington Blvd., St. Louis St. Louis - Grand Center

Buy TicketsAdmission is Free


Bea Nettles: Harvest of Memory is co-organized by the George Eastman Museum and the Sheldon Art Galleries, St. Louis. Internationally recognized for her experimental approaches to art-making that combine craft with alternative photographic processes, Bea Nettles explores the narrative potential of photography. Often incorporating autobiographical and metaphorical elements, Nettles’s imagery references key stages of a woman’s life. Her work examines place, nature, dreams, mythology, and the passage of time. The first exhibition to survey Nettles’s fifty-year career, Bea Nettles: Harvest of Memory provides a comprehensive look at the work of an artist who profoundly illuminates our inner worlds. 314-533-9900

Daniel Raedeke: Adventure

Tuesdays-Fridays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through Oct. 26
Bruno David Gallery 7513 Forsyth Blvd., Clayton Clayton


In his new series of paintings, Daniel Raedeke continues his exploration of the converging boundaries of our physical and digital worlds. Just as natural objects and scenes are photographed, organized, downloaded and shared through various user interfaces, in Adventure, Raedeke designs each painting as a sort of “poster” for experience. Layered, textured and organic surfaces are framed by graphically inspired color panels serving as containers for the handmade process of image making, nature exploration and escape. Floating on and emerging from the textured fragments of color are 3D icons and virtually rendered objects that hover over the randomly generated grounds. 1.314.696-2377

Damon Davis: Sad Panther

Tuesdays-Fridays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through Oct. 26
Bruno David Gallery 7513 Forsyth Blvd., Clayton Clayton


Sad Panther is an animated music video by acclaimed post-disciplinary artist Damon Davis. It embodies a visual representation of blackness in deity form, following the story of a God that woke up one day to find there existed a power even greater than him. This video is the visual counterpart to the song “Sad Panther” from Darker Gods, the accompanying full-length album to Davis’ exhibition Darker Gods in the Garden of the Low-Hanging Heavens that premiered at The Luminary in June 2018, and made a debut at Art Basel Miami later that year. 1.314.696-2377

Beyond the Surface: Surface Design Association Annual Juried Members' Exhibition

Through Oct. 23, 12-6 p.m.
St. Louis Artists' Guild 12 N Jackson Ave, Clayton Clayton


A textile nonprofit dedicated to promoting contemporary textile and fiber art, Surface Design Association (SDA) presents its annual juried members’ exhibition, Beyond the Surface, September 20- October 23, at the St Louis Artists’ Guild, St Louis, Missouri. Jurors Jo Stealey and Jim Arendt selected work by 48 artists. Award winners will be announced at the opening reception, October 3, 5-8pm. (314) 727-6266

Paper and Thread: Dreams are Made of These

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Continues through Oct. 30
Norton's Fine Art & Framing 2025 S. Big Bend Blvd., Richmond Heights Richmond Heights

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Paper and Thread: Dreams are Made of These Deann Rubin and Betty Shew - Handwoven Tapestry and Cast Paper Opening Reception- September 28th: 1 - 4pm Show runs through Weds, Oct. 30th In connection with Innovations in Textiles STL 2019 More details at their website - www.innovationsintextilesstl.org Regular Gallery hours: Tuesday - Saturday, 10 - 6 / Free and open to the public with free parking. 314-645-4040

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