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A Century of Japanese Prints

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 28, 2018

Japan had a long history of woodblock printing (ukiyo-e) that, although now recognized for their artistic qualities, were at the time purely commercial works. That began to change in the mid-nineteenth century, as Japanese artists were exposed to Western printmaking. These early modern artists began the creative print movement, which was motivated by a desire to explore the artistic possibilities of Japan's traditional hand-carved woodblock printing methods. Artists such as Kobayakawa Kiyoshi and Hashiguchi Goyō created portraits of modern Japanese society in prints that are both beautiful works of art and incredible documents of an era. The Saint Louis Art Museum displays a treasure trove of them in the new exhibit, A Century of Japanese Prints. The show opens on Friday, August 11, and remains up through January 28. Admission is free. free admission

Currents 114: Matt Saunders

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Feb. 4, 2018

American artist Matt Saunders is interested in the way an image can be altered with the passage of time. He pursues that interest through photography and animation, with a particular emphasis on avoiding cameras. Instead he captures light that has passed through oil paintings on linen, or through printed-on plastic, to create the shadows of images; his photograms are almost dark reflections of the intervening material. Saunders has created all-new work for Currents 114: Matt Saunders, his new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Among these new works are large-scale copper-plate etchings and a video installation that plays across multiple screens in two galleries. The mutable images of Matt Saunders are on display Tuesday through Sunday (November 17 to February 4) in gallery 249 and 250. Admission is free. free admission

Living Proof: The Art of Japanese Draftsmanship in the 19th Century

Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through March 3, 2018

As strange as it seems to us in the West, Japanese artists in the nineteenth century did not view their own drawings as individual works of art. They were "thinking on paper" or creating visual aids for wood carvers and printers who would create the actual work of art: the woodblock print. But despite their creators' misgivings about the artistry, drawings by master woodblock printers such as Utagawa Kuniyoshi and Katsushika Hokusai are indeed works of art. Living Proof: The Art of Japanese Draftsmanship in the 19th Century, the new exhibition at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation (3716 Washington Boulevard; www.pulitzerarts.org), collects more than 80 such "throwaway" drawings that capture the artists' work in their own hands, with corrections and alterations that demonstrate how they thought about and edited their projects "in camera." Living Proof is on display November 3 through March 3. free admission

Pulitzer Arts Foundation (map)
3716 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-754-1850
Living Proof: The Art of Japanese Draftsmanship in the 19th Century

Steve McCurry: The Importance of Elsewhere

Tuesdays-Saturdays. Continues through Feb. 3, 2018

Photographer Steve McCurry created an iconic image with his portrait of a young Afghani girl and her haunting, bottomless eyes, which stared down his lens and seemingly into the innermost chamber of your heart. But that photograph isn't the extent of McCurry's work. For almost 40 years he has been traveling the world, photographing people in India, the temples of Angkor Wat, burning oil fields in Kuwait, and indeed, even an entire series on the striking eyes he spots in people's faces the world over. Steve McCurry: The Importance of Elsewhere, the new exhibition of his work at the Sheldon (3648 Washington Boulevard; www.thesheldon.org), features 37 photographs made by McCurry during his journey. The exhibit opens with a free reception from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, October 6. The show continues through February 3, 2018, and the gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday. Admission is free. free admission

Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900
Steve McCurry: The Importance of Elsewhere

Theo Welling: Portraits

Sundays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11-1 a.m. Continues through Dec. 31

For the past couple years, Theo Welling has had a weekly gig photographing and interviewing St. Louisans for the Riverfront Times (there's that full disclosure). Every week the paper publishes the photo, and accompanying commentary from his subjects, as "The Lede." Welling has spoken with short-order cooks, kids, acrobats, artists, yoga practitioners — pretty much anybody who is willing to share something about their life. As documents, they're interesting, but as a barometer of what St. Louis worries about, believes, celebrates and condemns, they're fascinating. Welling's best shots are familiar and startling, reminding us that for all the ways we're different, we're also recognizably the same. Theo Welling: Portraits, an exhibition of his favorite images, opens with a free public reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, November 3, at the Dark Room (3610 Grandel Square; www.thedarkroomstl.com). The show remains up through December 31. free admission

The Dark Room (map)
3610 Grandel Square
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-776-9550
Theo Welling: Portraits

Kader Attia: Reason's Oxymorons

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 8, 2018

Human beings' adaptability is what allows people to gradually come to terms with catastrophic change and trauma. In the Western world, we consider it possible for someone who has experienced a tragedy to "heal," thereby erasing a wrong. But the non-Western world doesn't always believe that disaster can be plastered over. In some countries, the scars and imperfections are celebrated. These conflicting ideas of past damage are the inspiration for French-Algerian artist Kader Attia's exhibition Reason's Oxymorons. Attia interviewed and filmed historians, storytellers, philosophers and ethnographers from around the world discussing their cultural ideas of healing psychic damage. These films are then continuously played on an array of televisions placed throughout a maze of gray cubicles. The viewer can pass from cube to cube, gaining exposure to previously foreign worldviews. Kader Attia: Reason's Oxymorons opens with a free public reception from 7 to 9 p.m. tonight at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum on the Washington University campus (1 Brookings Drive; www.kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu). The show remains up through January 8, and the museum is open every day except Tuesday. free admission

Mickalene Thomas: Mentors, Muses and Celebrities

Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through Dec. 31

New York-based artist Mickalene Thomas pursues the perception of black women in the spotlight in her new exhibit, >Mentors, Muses and Celebrities. Known mostly for her rhinestone, acrylic and enamel paintings, here Thomas explores how gender and beauty are represented in modern society through film and video installations. Her twelve-minute, two-channel video projection Do I Look Like a Lady? features images of Eartha Kitt, Moms Mabley and Whitney Houston, all of them black women who attained a level of power and fame. Thomas draws equal inspiration from the three women at the heart of the film adaptation of The Color Purple, as played by Oprah Winfrey, Whoopi Goldberg and Margaret Avery. The juxtaposition of three characters who had little to no power in their lives being portrayed by three exceptionally powerful women is the essence of Thomas' work. Who decides which women are beautiful? What is the source of their power? Who controls the image? Mickalene Thomas: Mentors, Muses and Celebrities opens with a free public reception at 7 p.m. tonight at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org). The show remains up through December 31, and the museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. free admission

Yvonne Osei: Tailored Landscapes

Mondays-Wednesdays, Fridays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Thursdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through March 4, 2018

Yvonne Osei takes over the Adam Aronson Fine Arts Center for her exhibition Tailored Landscapes — literally. Her large-scale photo installation occupies the length and breadth of the gallery, the two-year-old indoor gallery located at Laumeier Sculpture Park. The German-born artist has been photographing Laumeier throughout the past year; these images are then manipulated to create patterns reminiscent of the brightly patterned textiles of her Ghanian culture. Osei's manufactured figures comprise people observing the park’s sculptures, roads and the backdrop of greenery that surrounds Laumeier, but these elements only become apparent at close range. free admission

Exposure 19: Jumbled Time

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 2

Gallery 210's long-running Exposure series brings together local artists who work in the same media or pursue the same ideas in their work. In the case of Exposure 19: Jumbled Time, Stan Chisholm, Lizzy Martinez and Adam Turl all share an interest in narrative art, whether that's the sometimes enigmatic phrases Chisholm stamps out on bricks and other building materials, or Turl's set-like assemblages of objects and paint that hint at the personality of their subject. Jumbled Time opens with a free artists' reception from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, August 26, at Gallery 210 on the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus (1 University Drive at Natural Bridge Road; 314-516-5976). The show remains up through December 2, and the gallery is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. free admission

University of Missouri-St. Louis-Gallery 210 (map)
1 University Dr at Natural Bridge Road
North St. Louis County
phone 314-516-5976
Exposure 19: Jumbled Time

Thomas Struth: Nature & Politics

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 21, 2018

We live in a high-tech world in which we can communicate instantly with someone on the other side of the globe — or even orbiting in space on the International Space Station — without really understanding how such technological marvels occur. We may as well be victims of Arthur C. Clarke's Third Law: "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." German artist Thomas Struth reveals how scientists and engineers perform their magic tricks simply by showing you where the magic happens. His monumental photographs reveal the research spaces and installations where science reshapes our world every day. Thirty-five of Struth's visually dense photographs make up the new exhibition Thomas Struth: Nature & Politics at Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). The show features robotics laboratories and aeronautical centers that appear to be sets from a big-budget sci-fi movie, but they're really just office spaces for some of the most intelligent people on earth. Thomas Struth: Nature & Politics will be on display November 5 through January 21. Admission is $6 to $12. $6-$12, free on Friday

City Wide Print Party

Fri., Nov. 17, 4-8 p.m.
info@hexstl.com

Join TechArtista and City Wide as we team up to celebrate some of the amazing local artists that we have here in St. Louis! Come by and have a drink, listen to some great tunes, and leave with a print or two from your new favorite local artists. Free to attend

https://www.facebook.com/events/194268521146355/
4 Hands Brewing Co. (map)
1220 S. 8th St.
St. Louis - Soulard
phone 314-436-1559
City Wide Print Party

Confluence of Conscience

Fri., Nov. 17, 5:30-8:30 p.m.
phone 314-865-0077
robert.bullivant@gmail.com

Please join Bullivant Gallery and J. Appel Photographs for a photography exhibit benefiting The Nature Conservancy. The work chosen expresses both the beauty of water by Jack Curran, Alan Ross, Cole Thompson, and Wayne Levin, contrasted by environmentally destructive images of Steve Brown. All photographs are available for sale. We will also have a second reception on Sat, Nov. 18, from 11am - 3pm

http://www.bullivantgallery.com/?page_id=1649
Bullivant Gallery (map)
3321 Washington Blvd
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-865-0077
Confluence of Conscience

Reclaim

Fri., Nov. 17, 6-8 p.m. and Wed., Nov. 29, 7-9 p.m.
amy@stlouisartistsguild.org
,

Gallery Talk with Juror Galen Gondolfi and Curated Artists Adam Long and Blake + Hannah Sanders November 17th from 6 to 8 p.m. Juried Artists Talk with Fine Line Studios, November 29th from 7 to 9 p.m. The St. Louis Artists' Guild presents, Reclaim, a Midwest regional all-media juried exhibition that contains work with a concern for the environment and mass consumption. In particular, there are many works of art made from repurposed and recycled materials. Through this exhibition, STLAG is interested in promoting artwork rooted in the tradition of found object and assemblage projects.

http://www.stlouisartistsguild.org/new/
St. Louis Artists' Guild (map)
12 N Jackson Ave
Clayton
phone 314-727-6266
Reclaim

Retrospective of Mary Engelbreit

Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Fri., Nov. 17, 5-9 p.m. Continues through Dec. 31
phone 314-402-1959
greendoorartgallery@aol.com
,

Green Door art gallery presents “Retrospective of Mary Engelbreit - Originals Exhibit/Sale which will run from November 1, 2017 thru December 31, 2017 featuring Mary Engelbreit’s original drawings, tiles and pastels on fabric by Deanna Nash, Confluence’s -Wildlife winners, textile art by Bee & Bee and over 35 other artists. Reception will be Friday, November 17, 2017 from 5-9 pm. Thirty other local artists will be exhibiting with artwork including textiles, glass, wood, paintings and much more! Green Door art gallery, located at 21 N. Gore in Old Webster Groves. Hours are Wednesday thru Sunday 10:00 am to 5:00 free

http://www.greendoorartgallery.com
Green Door Art Gallery (map)
21 N. Gore Ave.
Webster Groves
phone 314-402-1959
Retrospective of Mary Engelbreit

Quilt National 2017

Tuesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 1
phone 636-255-0270
melissa@foundryartcentre.org
,

The internationally-juried exhibition Quilt National 2017, curated by The Dairy Barn Arts Center in Athens, Ohio, joins the Foundry Art Centre once again for its renowned biennial collection of Art Quilts by contemporary fiber artists. The Foundry Art Centre is the only venue that will host the exhibition in its entirety aside from its original run at The Dairy Barn Arts Center. Quilt National 2017 opens at the Foundry Art Centre on Friday, October 6, 2017 and runs through Friday, December 1, 2017. Admission to the exhibitions is $5 per person. $5/person

http://www.foundryartcentre.org/2017-quilt-national/
Buy Tickets
Foundry Art Centre (map)
520 N. Main Center
St. Charles
phone 636-255-0270
Quilt National 2017
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