Events starting Sep. 26 in St. Louis - Downtown/ Midtown

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Pulitzer Prize Photographs and In Focus: St. Louis Post-Dispatch Photographs

Through Jan. 20, 2020
Missouri History Museum 5700 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis St. Louis - Forest Park

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Photographs are a key element of narrative storytelling, which is why it's so baffling that newspapers have deemed staff photographers an expendable luxury. You probably recognize many of the photographs that won Pulitzer Prizes, from Joe Rosenthal's shot Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, to Alan Diaz's memorable photo of U.S. federal agents seizing Elian Gonzalez, to St. Louis Post-Dispatch photographer Robert Cohen's 2014 image of a protestor throwing a tear-gas canister back at police while protesting the killing of Michael Brown. These photographs shock us, inspire feelings of pride and anger, and inform us, just as great written journalism does. The Newseum in Washington created a traveling exhibit of some of the most beautiful images to win the Pulitzer, and it's a show that will make its St. Louis debut on Saturday, August 3, at the Missouri History Museum (5700 Lindell Boulevard; www.mohistory.org). A second exhibition organized by the Missouri History Museum collected 75 photos of everyday life in St. Louis from the Post-Dispatch archives. Pulitzer Prize Photographs and In Focus: St. Louis Post-Dispatch Photographs remain on display through January 20, and admission is free. Parents are cautioned that some of the photographs are intense and may be too much for younger children. 314-746-4599

The Shape of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection

Through March 8, 2020, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.


The Shape of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection presents 40 abstract paintings, drawings, and prints by acclaimed black artists drawn from and celebrating the transformative gift of the Thelma and Bert Ollie Memorial Art Collection. In 2017, Ollie and his wife Monique gifted the Museum with 81 abstract works in honor of his parents, a collection that has added depth and breadth to the Museum’s holdings of works by black artists. 314.721.0072

Printing the Pastoral: Visions of the Countryside in 18th-Century Europe

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 1


The consumers of middle- and upper-class society in the eighteenth century developed a passion for rural scenes of traditional country life, just as the introduction of copperplate printing to the textile industry made it possible to produce fabrics with intricately detailed scenes printed upon them. Textile factories began churning out yards of fabric with shepherds, village fêtes and strolling couples for a market that could afford to buy them as furniture coverings, bedding and curtains. Printing the Pastoral: Visions of the Countryside in 18th-Century Europe, an exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum, includes numerous examples of the craft, several of which have never before been shown at the museum. The centerpiece of the exhibit is a reconstructed bed with printed bedding and curtains. Printing the Pastoral continues through December 1 in gallery 100 at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Admission is free. 314-721-0072

The Shape Of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through March 22


The Thelma and Bert Ollie Memorial Collection of abstract art officially went on display Tuesday, September 17, at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). The collection was gifted to the museum in 2017 by New Jersey-based art collector Ronald Maurice Ollie and his wife, Monique McRipley Ollie, in honor of Ronald's parents. The elder Ollies often visited the Saint Louis Art Museum with their children, instilling a lifelong passion for art. Ronald and Monique Ollie together collected art for many years, particularly work by contemporary black artists. Among the treasures in the exhibit, The Shape Of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection, are important works such as Robert Blackburn's lithograph Faux Pas, Mary Lovelace O'Neal's City Lights and Frank Bowling's Fishes, Wishes and Star Apple Blue, which demonstrates Bowling's innovative painting technique. In all, 40 works are displayed in the show, which draws its title from a poem by Quincy Troupe. The St. Louis native was inspired by the artworks in the Ollie Collection and wrote "The Shape of Abstraction; for Ron Ollie" in response. Troupe's poem is included in the exhibit catalog. 314-721-0072

Stewart D Halperin: One World - Five Decades and Six Continents

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Oct. 19


A visual journey through time and space – from the rainforests of Africa to the streets of New York City and points in between. Halperin found his photographic roots in the jungles of Tanzania studying chimpanzees along with Jane Goodall. During this time while observing the chimps Stewart developed a keen sense of observation- and what he now considers the most important element of good photography- the gift of time. Mentored by photographer Ernst Haas, Halperin traveled the world and documented his adventures. On display until October 19th at IPHF. 314-535-1999

Stephanie Syjuco: Rogue States

Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 29

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Artist Stephanie Syjuco was born in Manila and immigrated to the United States with her family when she was three years old, which gave her an American education and an immigrant's eye for our national blindspots. It's these blindspots that inform the art in her exhibition Stephanie Syjuco: Rogue States, which opens with a free reception at 7 p.m. Friday, September 6, at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org). The title of the show comes from her installation of 22 flags that were used to represent the flags of made-up nations in various American films. Also in the exhibit is her large-scale installation Neutral Calibration Studies (Ornament + Crime), which comprises artifacts representing both colonizer and colonized societies. Cultural objects such as wicker chairs and traditional rugs Syjuco purchased online, cardboard cutouts of people and actual artifacts are mixed together in a larger-than-life diorama. Nestled in the background is a color photograph of the "stone-age" tribe of the Tasaday, found on a remote island in the Philippines in the early 1970s, who were actually modern people posed by a photographer. Rogue States continues through December 29, and the museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. 314-535-4660

Cry-Baby

Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Oct. 19
Marcelle Theater 3310 Samuel Shepard Dr, St. Louis St. Louis - Grand Center


Continuing its proud tradition of righting Broadway's wrongs, New Line Theatre rehabilitated John Waters' musical Cry-Baby with its 2012 production of the show. The musical was pared down by the creators expressly for New Line's inaugural regional production, throwing out the bombast and orchestrations in favor of a more intimate show with a six-piece band. These changes brought Cry-Baby back to street-level 1954, when conformity and close-harmony singing ran headfirst into the hormones and heartache heralded by the pioneers of rock & roll. Wade "Cry-Baby" Walker is the uncrowned king of the Drapes (Baltimore's greasers). When good girl Alison falls for the tender-hearted Wade, she turns her back on all that's decent. Her jilted square boyfriend Baldwin will have his revenge on all Drapes and damn the consequences. New Line Theatre opens its new season with Cry-Baby. Performances are at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday (September 26 to October 19) at the Marcelle Theater (3310 Samuel Shepard Drive; www.newlinetheatre.com). Tickets are $20 to $30. 314-533-0367

Textures

Thu., Oct. 17, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri., Oct. 18, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 19, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave., St. Louis St. Louis - Central West End


A group show featuring 11 artists who use texture in their work, the exhibition will offer an opportunity to examine how this variable practice is used to express their intentions. This is an extensive exhibition featuring work by Lore Bert, Leila Daw, Claudia DeMonte, Nicola López, Kirk Pedersen, John Schwartzkopf, Steven Sorman, Janet Sorokin, Katy Stone, Christopher Tanner and William Yonker. While mostly two-dimensional works with collage and textured surfaces, also included are sculpture by John Schwartzkopf and Katy Stone, as well as new earthenware pieces by William Yonker. The exhibition opens Friday August 16th with a Reception from 6-8 314-367-1076

Cry-Baby

Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Oct. 19
Marcelle Theater 3310 Samuel Shepard Dr, St. Louis St. Louis - Grand Center

Buy Tickets10-30


It's 1954. Everyone likes Ike, nobody likes communism, and Wade "Cry-Baby" Walker is the coolest boy in Baltimore. He's a bad boy with a good cause -- truth, justice, and the pursuit of rock and roll. Wayward youth, juvenile delinquents, sexual repression, cool music, dirty lyrics, social rejects, it's all here! New Line opens its 29th season in October 2019 with the hilarious rockabilly musical CRY-BABY, based on the classic John Waters film. New Line first produced the show regionally in March 2012, after negotiating the first regional production rights in the country. 314-773-6526

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