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Kara Cooney: Women Who Ruled the World

Thu., April 25, 7-9 p.m.
phone 314-754-1850
khasler@pulitzerarts.org
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Presenting work from her newly published book, When Women Ruled the World: Six Queens of Egypt (2018), Egyptologist Dr. Kara Cooney will discuss the lives of remarkable female pharaohs from Hatshepsut to Cleopatra, shining a piercing light on perceptions of women in power today. The book will be for sale to audience members courtesy of Left Bank Books. This program is free to attend; however, we encourage visitors to arrive early due to limited seating. FREE

https://pulitzerarts.org/program/lecture-by-kara-cooney/
Pulitzer Arts Foundation (map)
3716 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-754-1850

Africans To Americans Ancestry Workshop

Sat., April 27, 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
phone 314-436-7009
info@grgstl.org
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As part of the Africans to Americans: 400 Years of History event, the Mary Meachum Freedom Crossing Celebration and St. Louis Public Library's Genealogy Room are co-hosting a free workshop to help people of color trace their ancestry in America. Typical genealogical research strategies often fail when applied to enslaved African Americans. Area residents can learn the value of tracing one’s family history and how to get started from a panel of experts. Keynote speaker is Dr. Gina Paige, Founder of African Ancestry. FREE

http://MaryMeachum.org

Dr. Keona K. Ervin: Black Women and the Struggle for Economic Justice in St. Louis

Thu., May 2, 5-6:30 p.m.
phone 314-977-8621
lorri.glover@slu.edu
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On 2 May 2019, at 5:00 in the St. Louis University Busch Student Center, room 251, historian Keona K. Ervin will speak about her transformational new book, Gateway to Equality: Black Women and the Struggle for Economic Justice in St. Louis (Kentucky, 2018). Dr. Ervin is an associate professor of history at the University of Missouri. Gateway to Equality explores the lives of black women in St. Louis, Missouri, between the 1930s and the 1960s, as they worked together to form a community-based culture of resistance— fighting for employment, a living wage, dignity, a better welfare system, and quality housing. Free and open to the public

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