Events starting Sep. 13 in St. Louis

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Printing the Pastoral: Visions of the Countryside in 18th-Century Europe

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 1


The consumers of middle- and upper-class society in the eighteenth century developed a passion for rural scenes of traditional country life, just as the introduction of copperplate printing to the textile industry made it possible to produce fabrics with intricately detailed scenes printed upon them. Textile factories began churning out yards of fabric with shepherds, village fêtes and strolling couples for a market that could afford to buy them as furniture coverings, bedding and curtains. Printing the Pastoral: Visions of the Countryside in 18th-Century Europe, an exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum, includes numerous examples of the craft, several of which have never before been shown at the museum. The centerpiece of the exhibit is a reconstructed bed with printed bedding and curtains. Printing the Pastoral continues through December 1 in gallery 100 at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Admission is free. 314-721-0072

Sam Falls: Conception

Through Dec. 22, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.


Sam Falls' artworks are inspired by, and at least in part created by, nature. For his exhibition at Laumeier Sculpture Park, Falls laid a canvas covered with dry pigments on ground in the park's woodland. Left there for several days, the dew, whatever rain fell and the sunlight that passed through the leaves overhead and onto the canvas made a record of the local flora. In addition to his large-scale nature paintings, Falls has also mosaicked a pair of steel I-beams with tiles featuring native plants grown especially by Laumeier's master gardener at Falls' request. The finished beams are placed standing upright in the forest, reflecting and refracting the natural landscape that surrounds them. Sam Falls: Conception opens with a free public reception from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, August 24, at the Aronson Fine Arts Center in Laumeier Sculpture Park (12580 Rott Road, Sunset Hills; www.laumeier.org). Falls' work remains on display through December 22. 314-615-5278

Angels in America: Parts One and Two

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through Oct. 6
Loretto-Hilton Center 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves Webster Groves


Time moves incredibly quickly. This past April, Repertory Theatre St. Louis artistic director Steven Woolf stepped down after helming the past 33 seasons. This September, incoming artistic director Hana S. Sharif embarks on her first season with the Rep. Sharif's season-opening show is definitely a statement piece: Tony Kushner's Angels in America: Parts One and Two. The Pulitzer and Tony award-winning drama tells the simultaneous stories of the early days of the AIDS crisis, a young gay couple haunted by the new plague, a young Mormon couple whose marriage is on shaky ground and the last days of hard-bitten lawyer Roy Cohn. Addiction, cowardice, lust for power and the fear of being true to yourself all factor into the groundbreaking drama. The Repertory Theatre St. Louis presents Angels in America: Parts One and Two in repertory (and on select days, back to back) Tuesday through Sunday (September 4 to October 6) at the Loretto-Hilton Center of the Performing Arts (130 Edgar Road; www.repstl.com). Tickets are $20 to $97.50.

Man of La Mancha

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through Oct. 6
Robert G. Reim Theatre 111 S. Geyer Road, Kirkwood Kirkwood


In the musical Man of La Mancha, nothing is quite what it seems. Miguel de Cervantes, a man who has failed at several careers, ends up in prison courtesy of the Spanish Inquisition. The other prisoners want to rifle through his belongings, but the leading prisoner suggests a trial instead, with the old man relinquishing his goods if he's found guilty. Cervantes' defense takes the form of a play within the play, in which he becomes a sixteenth-century nobleman who has gone mad and thinks he's Don Quixote, knight errant. The prisoners become actors within the play, all joining to tell a story that implies following one's dreams leads to happiness and true freedom, but the dream of all prisoners is to regain their freedom, isn't it? Worlds within worlds, actors in several plays at once — it's a trick mirror of a show. Stages St. Louis closes its season with Mitch Leigh, Joe Darion and Dale Wasserman's extended parable about the power of dreams and the horrors of reality. Man of La Mancha is performed Tuesday through Sunday (September 6 to October 6) at the Robert G. Reim Theatre (111 South Geyer Road, Kirkwood; www.stagesstlouis.org). Tickets are $25 to $65.

Carlos Zamora: cART

Through Dec. 22


Art is something to be appreciated, and St. Louis-based illustrator/graphic designer Carlos Zamora's cART exhibition at Laumeier Sculpture Park is one of those examples. Zamora transformed three golf carts into kinetic sculptures by installing his oversized paper boat sculptures on top and wrapping the bodies with printed vinyl slogans. A fourth large paper boat sculpture will be placed in a creek on the Laumeier grounds. The Cuban native drew inspiration for the project from his heritage, specifically the song "Baraquio de papel" — "Little Paper Boat" — as well as Cuban car culture, nursery rhymes and politics.

Carlos Zamora: cART opens with a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, July 25, at Laumeier Sculpture Park (12580 Rott Road; www.laumeier.org). The following night a Havana Night celebration takes place in the park's Aronson Fine Arts Center from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., with mojitos, snacks, "Casino" dance lessons and a screenprinted poster station. Tickets are $25, but admission to the park and Zamora's boat sculptures is free. The exhibition continues through December 22, and the park is open daily from 8 a.m. to 30 minutes past sunset.

314-615-5278

Pulitzer Prize Photographs and In Focus: St. Louis Post-Dispatch Photographs

Through Jan. 20, 2020
Missouri History Museum 5700 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis St. Louis - Forest Park

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Photographs are a key element of narrative storytelling, which is why it's so baffling that newspapers have deemed staff photographers an expendable luxury. You probably recognize many of the photographs that won Pulitzer Prizes, from Joe Rosenthal's shot Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, to Alan Diaz's memorable photo of U.S. federal agents seizing Elian Gonzalez, to St. Louis Post-Dispatch photographer Robert Cohen's 2014 image of a protestor throwing a tear-gas canister back at police while protesting the killing of Michael Brown. These photographs shock us, inspire feelings of pride and anger, and inform us, just as great written journalism does. The Newseum in Washington created a traveling exhibit of some of the most beautiful images to win the Pulitzer, and it's a show that will make its St. Louis debut on Saturday, August 3, at the Missouri History Museum (5700 Lindell Boulevard; www.mohistory.org). A second exhibition organized by the Missouri History Museum collected 75 photos of everyday life in St. Louis from the Post-Dispatch archives. Pulitzer Prize Photographs and In Focus: St. Louis Post-Dispatch Photographs remain on display through January 20, and admission is free. Parents are cautioned that some of the photographs are intense and may be too much for younger children. 314-746-4599

Diana Zeng: Outside In

Mondays-Fridays, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Continues through Oct. 1
Bonsack Gallery 755 S. Price Road, Ladue Ladue

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The Bonsack Gallery presents "Outside In," a solo exhibition by Diana Zeng that explores how we welcome influences from the outside world and examines how the foreign becomes familiar, from nature to unknown cultures. The show includes vibrant, large-scale oil paintings; abstract works on paper; and a gathering space centered around a re-imagined fire pit infused with personal cultural motifs of Zeng’s interracial family. Unifying her lived experiences between the American Midwest and her ancestral home in China, Zeng confronts innate reactions toward the Other, not as stranger, but as kin. To preview her work, visit dianazeng.com. 314-993-4040

Balinese Art

Through Sept. 22, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.


Balinese Art features a selection of rich and varied works of art produced in Bali, Indonesia during the 20th century. Bali’s visual and performing arts reflect the Hindu religious beliefs of its people that are distinct from the predominantly Islamic culture found elsewhere in Indonesia. Artists drew inspiration from nature, village life, and narratives from Hindu epics and local tales. The installation includes eight paintings and two ceremonial masks used for the central figures in the giant puppet dance known as Barong Landung, which may still be experienced today. Gallery 225 is devoted to the periodic rotation of Asian art 314.721.0072

Man of La Mancha

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 8-10 p.m., Saturdays, 4-6 p.m., Sundays, 7:30-10 p.m. and Thursdays, Sundays, 2-4 p.m. Continues through Oct. 6
Robert G. Reim Theatre 111 S. Geyer Road, Kirkwood Kirkwood

Buy Tickets$25 - $65


Dream the impossible dream on a romantic musical adventure led by Don Quixote De La Mancha! Inspired by the classic Miguel de Cervantes’ seventeenth-century masterpiece Don Quixote, Man of La Mancha tells the story of the title chivalrous knight and his epic misadventures that take him into battles with imaginary adversaries of the mind and into romance with the beautiful Dulcinea. A poignant combination of drama, comedy, and imagination, Man of La Mancha features a lush melodic score that includes the rousing title tune, the rapturous “Dulcinea,” the classic “The Impossible Dream,” and more. Join STAGES for this inspiration journey. 314-821-2407

Soft Scrub

Fridays, Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Wednesdays, Thursdays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Oct. 26
The Luminary 2701 Cherokee St, St. Louis St. Louis - South City


The everyday black household is foreign territory to most of America. There have been a few TV shows (The Jeffersons at the richer end of the spectrum, Good Times at the more financially tenuous) that depicted fictionalized domestic situations, but even those can be considered non-standard families. They certainly weren't entirely relatable to Katherine Simóne Reynolds' own upbringing. Inspired by this dearth of representation, Reynolds asked black male artists to address the idea of black home life from a male perspective. The exhibition Soft Scrub challenges stereotypes and reveals lessons learned about cleanliness, division of labor and social expectations. Soft Scrub opens with a free reception from 7 to 10 p.m. Friday, September 13, at the Luminary (2701 Cherokee Street; www.theluminaryarts.com). Participating artists include Vaughn Davis Jr., Mitchell Squire, Cameron Granger and Keyon Gaskin. The exhibit remains up through October 26. 314-773-1533

Stephanie Syjuco: Rogue States

Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 29

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Artist Stephanie Syjuco was born in Manila and immigrated to the United States with her family when she was three years old, which gave her an American education and an immigrant's eye for our national blindspots. It's these blindspots that inform the art in her exhibition Stephanie Syjuco: Rogue States, which opens with a free reception at 7 p.m. Friday, September 6, at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org). The title of the show comes from her installation of 22 flags that were used to represent the flags of made-up nations in various American films. Also in the exhibit is her large-scale installation Neutral Calibration Studies (Ornament + Crime), which comprises artifacts representing both colonizer and colonized societies. Cultural objects such as wicker chairs and traditional rugs Syjuco purchased online, cardboard cutouts of people and actual artifacts are mixed together in a larger-than-life diorama. Nestled in the background is a color photograph of the "stone-age" tribe of the Tasaday, found on a remote island in the Philippines in the early 1970s, who were actually modern people posed by a photographer. Rogue States continues through December 29, and the museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. 314-535-4660

A Model for Matisse

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Sept. 21
.Zack 3224 Locust St, St. Louis St. Louis - Grand Center


While recovering from cancer surgery, French artist Henri Matisse hired a night nurse who shaped the course of his remaining years. Monique, the young woman who got the job, was an amateur artist who befriended the old man and sat for several paintings. Their friendship remained close even after she took her vows as a Dominican nun. Monique, now Sister Jacques-Marie, asked Matisse if he would design the new chapel for the small French city of Vence, a challenge that the now 77-year-old artist spent four years pursuing. The story of Matisse and Sister Jacques-Marie's friendship and the creation of Matisse's masterpiece was told in Barbara F. Freed's documentary A Model for Matisse, which so inspired local actor and writer Joe Hanrahan that he adapted it for the stage with Freed's help. The play A Model for Matisse makes its world premiere at 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday (September 13 to 21) at the .Zack (3224 Locust Street; www.midnightcompany.com). There are additional performances at 2 and 7 p.m. Sunday, September 15, and tickets are $20. 314-533-0367

Angels in America, Part Two: Perestroika

Wed., Sept. 18, 7 p.m., Fri., Sept. 20, 7 p.m., Sat., Sept. 21, 7 p.m., Sun., Sept. 22, 1 p.m., Tue., Sept. 24, 7 p.m., Thu., Sept. 26, 7 p.m., Sat., Sept. 28, 7 p.m., Sun., Sept. 29, 7 p.m., Wed., Oct. 2, 7 p.m., Fri., Oct. 4, 7 p.m., Sat., Oct. 5, 7 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 6, 7 p.m.
Loretto-Hilton Center 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves Webster Groves

Buy TicketsPlease visit REPSTL.ORG or call Rep Box Office – 314-968-4925.

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Directed by Jeremy Cohen | SEP 11 – OCT 6 | A towering epic that unveils new depths with each passing year, Tony Kushner’s Tony- and Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece arrives on The Rep's stage for the first time. | For a complete performance schedule for Part One: Millennium Approaches and Part Two: Perestroika, as well as information on marathon dates and dining options, visit http://www.repstl.org/events/detail/angels-in-america-parts-one-and-two 314-968-4925

A Model For Matisse

Wed., Sept. 18, 8-8:30 p.m., Thu., Sept. 19, 8-8:30 p.m., Fri., Sept. 20, 8-8:30 p.m. and Sat., Sept. 21, 8-8:30 p.m.
.Zack 3224 Locust St, St. Louis St. Louis - Grand Center

Buy Tickets$20


Monique Bourgeois was a 21-year old nursing student when, in 1941, she answered by ad from Henri Matisse seeking a "young and pretty" night nurse. From this humble beginning grew the little know, tender relationship between one of the greatest artists of the twentieth century and the woman who became Souer Jacques-Marie and who inspired him to create what he considered his masterpiece: The Chapel of the Rosary in the French Mediterranean village of Vence. "One of the great love affairs of art history" (Philadelphia Inquirer) A World Premiere from the Midnight Company, written by Barbara F. Freed and Joe Hanrahan. 314-799-5910

Don't Bother Me, I Can't Cope

Sundays, 3 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. and Thursdays, 7 p.m. Continues through Sept. 22
Edison Theatre 6445 Forsyth Blvd., St. Louis Clayton

Buy Tickets$15-$50


Composer Micki Grant and director Vinnette Carroll made history with their 1971 musical Don't Bother Me, I Can't Cope. The revue was the first Broadway show written and directed by black women. The show's songs are interspersed with a little bit of dialogue, the topics ranging from the inalienable right of black people to exist ("My Name Is Man") to the list of white annoyances (bad bosses, nasty clerks at the unemployment office) that populate the title track. Don't Bother Me has been praised as a combination of "block party and revival," and while the 1970s may be long gone, most of the issues remain relevant. The Black Rep opens its 43rd season with the high-energy musical. Performances are at 7 p.m. Thursday, 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday (September 4 to 22) at Washington University's Edison Theatre (6445 Forsyth Boulevard; www.theblackrep.org). Tickets are $15 to $50. 314-935-6543

Textures

Thu., Sept. 19, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri., Sept. 20, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat., Sept. 21, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu., Sept. 26, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri., Sept. 27, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat., Sept. 28, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu., Oct. 3, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri., Oct. 4, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat., Oct. 5, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu., Oct. 10, Fri., Oct. 11, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat., Oct. 12, Thu., Oct. 17, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri., Oct. 18, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 19, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave., St. Louis St. Louis - Central West End


A group show featuring 11 artists who use texture in their work, the exhibition will offer an opportunity to examine how this variable practice is used to express their intentions. This is an extensive exhibition featuring work by Lore Bert, Leila Daw, Claudia DeMonte, Nicola López, Kirk Pedersen, John Schwartzkopf, Steven Sorman, Janet Sorokin, Katy Stone, Christopher Tanner and William Yonker. While mostly two-dimensional works with collage and textured surfaces, also included are sculpture by John Schwartzkopf and Katy Stone, as well as new earthenware pieces by William Yonker. The exhibition opens Friday August 16th with a Reception from 6-8 314-367-1076

Zombie Love Murder Mystery Dinner Theater

Fridays, Saturdays, 7-10 p.m. Continues through Nov. 2


Join us and enjoy an exciting evening of murder, mystery and mayhem at the most dangerous comedy dinner theater show in town. Dig into a fantastic three-course dinner at the Famously Haunted Lemp Mansion and figure out who-dun-it during Zombie Love! Parts will be passed out at the door and guests can participate as much or as little as they would like to. Seats are just $52.95 per person and include a delicious 3-course dinner. Call 314-664-8024 for more details and to make your reservations. Learn more about Jest Murder Mystery Company jestmurdermystery.com/st-louis-mo/ 314-664-8024

A Long Day's Journey Into Night

Fridays, Saturdays, 7-10 p.m. Continues through Sept. 21
The Chapel 6238 Alexander Dr, Clayton Clayton

Buy Tickets$15-$20


Slaying Dragons focuses its fall performance this year on opioid and alcohol addiction. There is no greater play that expresses the heartbreak and devastation of these mental illnesses on a family than this play originally written by Eugene O'Neil. The setting of the play is the early 20th Century. Unfortunately, these addictions have become a greater tragedy as they take the lives of even more of our youth today. We have chosen to broaden the time period as well as other aspects of the play through our production to reach as many populations as possible. 314-596-1219

The Boom Boom Room Friday Burlesque Dinner Show

Fridays, 7-9 p.m. Continues through Dec. 28

Buy Tickets$41/person for dinner and the show


Join us this Friday for our exciting burlesque dinner and show at 7 P.M. The Boom Boom Bombshells will provide a fun night of entertainment, through burlesque, comedy, cirque acts and more. You will also enjoy a three-course meal to your delight. Dinner, drinks, and a show, who could ask for more. This is perfect for date night, bachelorette/bachelor parties, birthdays, girls’ night out, tourists and more visiting downtown St. Louis. 314-436-7000

The Boom Boom Revue Friday Late Burlesque Show

Fridays, 10-11:59 p.m. Continues through Dec. 28

Buy Tickets$22/person

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Join us at The Boom Boom Room for the most entertaining Friday evening you can have in downtown St. Louis. The Boom Boom Revue is the perfect burlesque show just for you. Dancing, comedy, specialty cirque acts and more await you in our intimate venue. It’s so much fun come and see what audiences have been enjoying for the past few years. We offer a full bar, and appetizers are available for purchase. 314-436-7000

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