Arts & Theater Events starting Sep. 25 in St. Louis

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Printing the Pastoral: Visions of the Countryside in 18th-Century Europe

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 1


The consumers of middle- and upper-class society in the eighteenth century developed a passion for rural scenes of traditional country life, just as the introduction of copperplate printing to the textile industry made it possible to produce fabrics with intricately detailed scenes printed upon them. Textile factories began churning out yards of fabric with shepherds, village fêtes and strolling couples for a market that could afford to buy them as furniture coverings, bedding and curtains. Printing the Pastoral: Visions of the Countryside in 18th-Century Europe, an exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum, includes numerous examples of the craft, several of which have never before been shown at the museum. The centerpiece of the exhibit is a reconstructed bed with printed bedding and curtains. Printing the Pastoral continues through December 1 in gallery 100 at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Admission is free. 314-721-0072

Sam Falls: Conception

Through Dec. 22, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.


Sam Falls' artworks are inspired by, and at least in part created by, nature. For his exhibition at Laumeier Sculpture Park, Falls laid a canvas covered with dry pigments on ground in the park's woodland. Left there for several days, the dew, whatever rain fell and the sunlight that passed through the leaves overhead and onto the canvas made a record of the local flora. In addition to his large-scale nature paintings, Falls has also mosaicked a pair of steel I-beams with tiles featuring native plants grown especially by Laumeier's master gardener at Falls' request. The finished beams are placed standing upright in the forest, reflecting and refracting the natural landscape that surrounds them. Sam Falls: Conception opens with a free public reception from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, August 24, at the Aronson Fine Arts Center in Laumeier Sculpture Park (12580 Rott Road, Sunset Hills; www.laumeier.org). Falls' work remains on display through December 22. 314-615-5278

The Shape Of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through March 22


The Thelma and Bert Ollie Memorial Collection of abstract art officially went on display Tuesday, September 17, at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). The collection was gifted to the museum in 2017 by New Jersey-based art collector Ronald Maurice Ollie and his wife, Monique McRipley Ollie, in honor of Ronald's parents. The elder Ollies often visited the Saint Louis Art Museum with their children, instilling a lifelong passion for art. Ronald and Monique Ollie together collected art for many years, particularly work by contemporary black artists. Among the treasures in the exhibit, The Shape Of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection, are important works such as Robert Blackburn's lithograph Faux Pas, Mary Lovelace O'Neal's City Lights and Frank Bowling's Fishes, Wishes and Star Apple Blue, which demonstrates Bowling's innovative painting technique. In all, 40 works are displayed in the show, which draws its title from a poem by Quincy Troupe. The St. Louis native was inspired by the artworks in the Ollie Collection and wrote "The Shape of Abstraction; for Ron Ollie" in response. Troupe's poem is included in the exhibit catalog. 314-721-0072

Angels in America: Parts One and Two

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through Oct. 6
Loretto-Hilton Center 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves Webster Groves


Time moves incredibly quickly. This past April, Repertory Theatre St. Louis artistic director Steven Woolf stepped down after helming the past 33 seasons. This September, incoming artistic director Hana S. Sharif embarks on her first season with the Rep. Sharif's season-opening show is definitely a statement piece: Tony Kushner's Angels in America: Parts One and Two. The Pulitzer and Tony award-winning drama tells the simultaneous stories of the early days of the AIDS crisis, a young gay couple haunted by the new plague, a young Mormon couple whose marriage is on shaky ground and the last days of hard-bitten lawyer Roy Cohn. Addiction, cowardice, lust for power and the fear of being true to yourself all factor into the groundbreaking drama. The Repertory Theatre St. Louis presents Angels in America: Parts One and Two in repertory (and on select days, back to back) Tuesday through Sunday (September 4 to October 6) at the Loretto-Hilton Center of the Performing Arts (130 Edgar Road; www.repstl.com). Tickets are $20 to $97.50.

Man of La Mancha

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through Oct. 6
Robert G. Reim Theatre 111 S. Geyer Road, Kirkwood Kirkwood


In the musical Man of La Mancha, nothing is quite what it seems. Miguel de Cervantes, a man who has failed at several careers, ends up in prison courtesy of the Spanish Inquisition. The other prisoners want to rifle through his belongings, but the leading prisoner suggests a trial instead, with the old man relinquishing his goods if he's found guilty. Cervantes' defense takes the form of a play within the play, in which he becomes a sixteenth-century nobleman who has gone mad and thinks he's Don Quixote, knight errant. The prisoners become actors within the play, all joining to tell a story that implies following one's dreams leads to happiness and true freedom, but the dream of all prisoners is to regain their freedom, isn't it? Worlds within worlds, actors in several plays at once — it's a trick mirror of a show. Stages St. Louis closes its season with Mitch Leigh, Joe Darion and Dale Wasserman's extended parable about the power of dreams and the horrors of reality. Man of La Mancha is performed Tuesday through Sunday (September 6 to October 6) at the Robert G. Reim Theatre (111 South Geyer Road, Kirkwood; www.stagesstlouis.org). Tickets are $25 to $65.

Carlos Zamora: cART

Through Dec. 22


Art is something to be appreciated, and St. Louis-based illustrator/graphic designer Carlos Zamora's cART exhibition at Laumeier Sculpture Park is one of those examples. Zamora transformed three golf carts into kinetic sculptures by installing his oversized paper boat sculptures on top and wrapping the bodies with printed vinyl slogans. A fourth large paper boat sculpture will be placed in a creek on the Laumeier grounds. The Cuban native drew inspiration for the project from his heritage, specifically the song "Baraquio de papel" — "Little Paper Boat" — as well as Cuban car culture, nursery rhymes and politics.

Carlos Zamora: cART opens with a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, July 25, at Laumeier Sculpture Park (12580 Rott Road; www.laumeier.org). The following night a Havana Night celebration takes place in the park's Aronson Fine Arts Center from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., with mojitos, snacks, "Casino" dance lessons and a screenprinted poster station. Tickets are $25, but admission to the park and Zamora's boat sculptures is free. The exhibition continues through December 22, and the park is open daily from 8 a.m. to 30 minutes past sunset.

314-615-5278

Pulitzer Prize Photographs and In Focus: St. Louis Post-Dispatch Photographs

Through Jan. 20, 2020
Missouri History Museum 5700 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis St. Louis - Forest Park

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Photographs are a key element of narrative storytelling, which is why it's so baffling that newspapers have deemed staff photographers an expendable luxury. You probably recognize many of the photographs that won Pulitzer Prizes, from Joe Rosenthal's shot Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, to Alan Diaz's memorable photo of U.S. federal agents seizing Elian Gonzalez, to St. Louis Post-Dispatch photographer Robert Cohen's 2014 image of a protestor throwing a tear-gas canister back at police while protesting the killing of Michael Brown. These photographs shock us, inspire feelings of pride and anger, and inform us, just as great written journalism does. The Newseum in Washington created a traveling exhibit of some of the most beautiful images to win the Pulitzer, and it's a show that will make its St. Louis debut on Saturday, August 3, at the Missouri History Museum (5700 Lindell Boulevard; www.mohistory.org). A second exhibition organized by the Missouri History Museum collected 75 photos of everyday life in St. Louis from the Post-Dispatch archives. Pulitzer Prize Photographs and In Focus: St. Louis Post-Dispatch Photographs remain on display through January 20, and admission is free. Parents are cautioned that some of the photographs are intense and may be too much for younger children. 314-746-4599

Howard Barry: Inertia

Tuesdays-Saturdays. Continues through Dec. 9
University of Missouri-St. Louis-Gallery 210 1 University Dr at Natural Bridge Road, Normandy North St. Louis County


Local artist Howard Barry has gained significant attention for his illustrations inspired by the Ferguson protests, but he's not just an activist artist. Barry's drawings are a form of physical therapy and mental therapy. He creates to relieve his frustration with the world and his own pain. Using ink, coffee and various computer programs for effects, Barry creates images of artists, musicians, civil rights pioneers and modern-day protesters, all with an eye for gesture and a gift for imbuing something of his subject's character. James Baldwin's luminous eyes reveal his hurt and anger with the country that rejected him for his blackness and homosexuality, while a barefoot child pushing his way through cotton emerges from a page of sheet music for Billie Holiday's "God Bless the Child." Inertia, an exhibition of Barry's artwork, opens with a free reception from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday, September 14, at Gallery 210 on the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus (1 University Drive at Natural Bridge Road; www. gallery210.umsl.edu). The show remains on display through December 9. 314-516-5976

Stephanie Syjuco: Rogue States

Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 29

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Artist Stephanie Syjuco was born in Manila and immigrated to the United States with her family when she was three years old, which gave her an American education and an immigrant's eye for our national blindspots. It's these blindspots that inform the art in her exhibition Stephanie Syjuco: Rogue States, which opens with a free reception at 7 p.m. Friday, September 6, at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org). The title of the show comes from her installation of 22 flags that were used to represent the flags of made-up nations in various American films. Also in the exhibit is her large-scale installation Neutral Calibration Studies (Ornament + Crime), which comprises artifacts representing both colonizer and colonized societies. Cultural objects such as wicker chairs and traditional rugs Syjuco purchased online, cardboard cutouts of people and actual artifacts are mixed together in a larger-than-life diorama. Nestled in the background is a color photograph of the "stone-age" tribe of the Tasaday, found on a remote island in the Philippines in the early 1970s, who were actually modern people posed by a photographer. Rogue States continues through December 29, and the museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. 314-535-4660

Soft Scrub

Fridays, Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Wednesdays, Thursdays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Oct. 26
The Luminary 2701 Cherokee St, St. Louis St. Louis - South City


The everyday black household is foreign territory to most of America. There have been a few TV shows (The Jeffersons at the richer end of the spectrum, Good Times at the more financially tenuous) that depicted fictionalized domestic situations, but even those can be considered non-standard families. They certainly weren't entirely relatable to Katherine Simóne Reynolds' own upbringing. Inspired by this dearth of representation, Reynolds asked black male artists to address the idea of black home life from a male perspective. The exhibition Soft Scrub challenges stereotypes and reveals lessons learned about cleanliness, division of labor and social expectations. Soft Scrub opens with a free reception from 7 to 10 p.m. Friday, September 13, at the Luminary (2701 Cherokee Street; www.theluminaryarts.com). Participating artists include Vaughn Davis Jr., Mitchell Squire, Cameron Granger and Keyon Gaskin. The exhibit remains up through October 26. 314-773-1533

Angels in America, Part One: Millennium Approaches

Sat., Sept. 21, 1 p.m., Wed., Sept. 25, 1 p.m., Fri., Sept. 27, 7 p.m., Sat., Sept. 28, 1 p.m., Sun., Sept. 29, 1 p.m., Tue., Oct. 1, 7 p.m., Thu., Oct. 3, 7 p.m., Sat., Oct. 5, 1 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 6, 1 p.m.
Loretto-Hilton Center 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves Webster Groves

Buy TicketsPlease visit REPSTL.ORG or call Rep Box Office – 314-968-4925.

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Directed by Jeremy Cohen SEP 4 – OCT 6 A towering epic that unveils new depths with each passing year, Tony Kushner’s Tony- and Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece arrives on The Rep's stage for the first time. For a complete performance schedule for Angels in America, Part One: Millennium Approaches and Part Two: Perestroika, as well as information on marathon dates and dining options, visit http://www.repstl.org/events/detail/angels-in-america-parts-one-and-two 314-968-4925

Diana Zeng: Outside In

Mondays-Fridays, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Continues through Oct. 1
Bonsack Gallery 755 S. Price Road, Ladue Ladue

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The Bonsack Gallery presents "Outside In," a solo exhibition by Diana Zeng that explores how we welcome influences from the outside world and examines how the foreign becomes familiar, from nature to unknown cultures. The show includes vibrant, large-scale oil paintings; abstract works on paper; and a gathering space centered around a re-imagined fire pit infused with personal cultural motifs of Zeng’s interracial family. Unifying her lived experiences between the American Midwest and her ancestral home in China, Zeng confronts innate reactions toward the Other, not as stranger, but as kin. To preview her work, visit dianazeng.com. 314-993-4040

The Shape of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection

Through March 8, 2020, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.


The Shape of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection presents 40 abstract paintings, drawings, and prints by acclaimed black artists drawn from and celebrating the transformative gift of the Thelma and Bert Ollie Memorial Art Collection. In 2017, Ollie and his wife Monique gifted the Museum with 81 abstract works in honor of his parents, a collection that has added depth and breadth to the Museum’s holdings of works by black artists. 314.721.0072

Damon Davis: Sad Panther

Tuesdays-Fridays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through Oct. 26
Bruno David Gallery 7513 Forsyth Blvd., Clayton Clayton


Sad Panther is an animated music video by acclaimed post-disciplinary artist Damon Davis. It embodies a visual representation of blackness in deity form, following the story of a God that woke up one day to find there existed a power even greater than him. This video is the visual counterpart to the song “Sad Panther” from Darker Gods, the accompanying full-length album to Davis’ exhibition Darker Gods in the Garden of the Low-Hanging Heavens that premiered at The Luminary in June 2018, and made a debut at Art Basel Miami later that year. 1.314.696-2377

Thomas Sleet: Integration: Sacred Space

Tuesdays-Fridays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through Oct. 26
Bruno David Gallery 7513 Forsyth Blvd., Clayton Clayton


Since his youth, Thomas Sleet was always fascinated with nature. He tells stories about growing up in Kirkwood in the 60’s, playing in creeks and running around the neighborhood with his siblings. This fascination followed him well into his adult years, showing up in his sculptures, paintings, prints, and more. True to concepts consistent in past works, Integration: Scared Space continues with Sleet’s theme of intersecting the natural and the manufactured. His new wall mounted pieces highlight his carefully designed experiments with light, space, arrangement/placement, and the concept of the individual intersecting with the whole—the collective. 1.314.696-2377

Jill Downen: Here all is distance, there it was Breath

Tuesdays-Fridays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through Oct. 26
Bruno David Gallery 7513 Forsyth Blvd., Clayton Clayton


The show features Downen’s recent 8 X 10 inches drawings, executed in plaster, lapis lazuli and gold leaf — nearly forty works in all. This new body of work expands the artist’s renowned exploration of human spatial experience and the contemplative value of architectural form. Refined by decades of work with large scale sculptural installations, Downen’s drawings benefit not only from precise conceptual motivation, but also from her distilled palette and proven skill with plaster, lapis and gold leaf. Each piece depicts a moment in which new space emerges or where fragmented structure moves toward balance. 1.314.696-2377

Daniel Raedeke: Adventure

Tuesdays-Fridays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through Oct. 26
Bruno David Gallery 7513 Forsyth Blvd., Clayton Clayton


In his new series of paintings, Daniel Raedeke continues his exploration of the converging boundaries of our physical and digital worlds. Just as natural objects and scenes are photographed, organized, downloaded and shared through various user interfaces, in Adventure, Raedeke designs each painting as a sort of “poster” for experience. Layered, textured and organic surfaces are framed by graphically inspired color panels serving as containers for the handmade process of image making, nature exploration and escape. Floating on and emerging from the textured fragments of color are 3D icons and virtually rendered objects that hover over the randomly generated grounds. 1.314.696-2377

Man of La Mancha

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 8-10 p.m., Saturdays, 4-6 p.m., Sundays, 7:30-10 p.m. and Thursdays, Sundays, 2-4 p.m. Continues through Oct. 6
Robert G. Reim Theatre 111 S. Geyer Road, Kirkwood Kirkwood

Buy Tickets$25 - $65


Dream the impossible dream on a romantic musical adventure led by Don Quixote De La Mancha! Inspired by the classic Miguel de Cervantes’ seventeenth-century masterpiece Don Quixote, Man of La Mancha tells the story of the title chivalrous knight and his epic misadventures that take him into battles with imaginary adversaries of the mind and into romance with the beautiful Dulcinea. A poignant combination of drama, comedy, and imagination, Man of La Mancha features a lush melodic score that includes the rousing title tune, the rapturous “Dulcinea,” the classic “The Impossible Dream,” and more. Join STAGES for this inspiration journey. 314-821-2407

Stewart D Halperin: One World - Five Decades and Six Continents

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Oct. 19


A visual journey through time and space – from the rainforests of Africa to the streets of New York City and points in between. Halperin found his photographic roots in the jungles of Tanzania studying chimpanzees along with Jane Goodall. During this time while observing the chimps Stewart developed a keen sense of observation- and what he now considers the most important element of good photography- the gift of time. Mentored by photographer Ernst Haas, Halperin traveled the world and documented his adventures. On display until October 19th at IPHF. 314-535-1999

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