Arts & Theater Events starting Oct. 20 in St. Louis - Downtown/ Midtown

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Open Studios STL

Sat., Oct. 19, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 20, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

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For fourteen years now, Open Studios STL has arranged for tours of working artists' studios in order to demystify the art-making process. This year more than 120 artists are participating in Open Studios Weekend, which takes place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday (October 19 and 20). Saturday is reserved for artists west of Grand Boulevard and Sunday is for everything east of Grand, although some artists participate both days. Artists will answer questions, discuss their methods and in some cases sell their work directly to interested parties. (Many will also be working on something, because to work is the nature of an artist.) Maps of the studios that are open are available at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard), and online at openstudios-stl.org. Admission is free. 314-535-4660

The Shape Of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through March 22


The Thelma and Bert Ollie Memorial Collection of abstract art officially went on display Tuesday, September 17, at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). The collection was gifted to the museum in 2017 by New Jersey-based art collector Ronald Maurice Ollie and his wife, Monique McRipley Ollie, in honor of Ronald's parents. The elder Ollies often visited the Saint Louis Art Museum with their children, instilling a lifelong passion for art. Ronald and Monique Ollie together collected art for many years, particularly work by contemporary black artists. Among the treasures in the exhibit, The Shape Of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection, are important works such as Robert Blackburn's lithograph Faux Pas, Mary Lovelace O'Neal's City Lights and Frank Bowling's Fishes, Wishes and Star Apple Blue, which demonstrates Bowling's innovative painting technique. In all, 40 works are displayed in the show, which draws its title from a poem by Quincy Troupe. The St. Louis native was inspired by the artworks in the Ollie Collection and wrote "The Shape of Abstraction; for Ron Ollie" in response. Troupe's poem is included in the exhibit catalog. 314-721-0072

Pulitzer Prize Photographs and In Focus: St. Louis Post-Dispatch Photographs

Through Jan. 20, 2020
Missouri History Museum 5700 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis St. Louis - Forest Park

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Photographs are a key element of narrative storytelling, which is why it's so baffling that newspapers have deemed staff photographers an expendable luxury. You probably recognize many of the photographs that won Pulitzer Prizes, from Joe Rosenthal's shot Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, to Alan Diaz's memorable photo of U.S. federal agents seizing Elian Gonzalez, to St. Louis Post-Dispatch photographer Robert Cohen's 2014 image of a protestor throwing a tear-gas canister back at police while protesting the killing of Michael Brown. These photographs shock us, inspire feelings of pride and anger, and inform us, just as great written journalism does. The Newseum in Washington created a traveling exhibit of some of the most beautiful images to win the Pulitzer, and it's a show that will make its St. Louis debut on Saturday, August 3, at the Missouri History Museum (5700 Lindell Boulevard; www.mohistory.org). A second exhibition organized by the Missouri History Museum collected 75 photos of everyday life in St. Louis from the Post-Dispatch archives. Pulitzer Prize Photographs and In Focus: St. Louis Post-Dispatch Photographs remain on display through January 20, and admission is free. Parents are cautioned that some of the photographs are intense and may be too much for younger children. 314-746-4599

Stephanie Syjuco: Rogue States

Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 29

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Artist Stephanie Syjuco was born in Manila and immigrated to the United States with her family when she was three years old, which gave her an American education and an immigrant's eye for our national blindspots. It's these blindspots that inform the art in her exhibition Stephanie Syjuco: Rogue States, which opens with a free reception at 7 p.m. Friday, September 6, at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org). The title of the show comes from her installation of 22 flags that were used to represent the flags of made-up nations in various American films. Also in the exhibit is her large-scale installation Neutral Calibration Studies (Ornament + Crime), which comprises artifacts representing both colonizer and colonized societies. Cultural objects such as wicker chairs and traditional rugs Syjuco purchased online, cardboard cutouts of people and actual artifacts are mixed together in a larger-than-life diorama. Nestled in the background is a color photograph of the "stone-age" tribe of the Tasaday, found on a remote island in the Philippines in the early 1970s, who were actually modern people posed by a photographer. Rogue States continues through December 29, and the museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. 314-535-4660

Printing the Pastoral: Visions of the Countryside in 18th-Century Europe

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 1


The consumers of middle- and upper-class society in the eighteenth century developed a passion for rural scenes of traditional country life, just as the introduction of copperplate printing to the textile industry made it possible to produce fabrics with intricately detailed scenes printed upon them. Textile factories began churning out yards of fabric with shepherds, village fêtes and strolling couples for a market that could afford to buy them as furniture coverings, bedding and curtains. Printing the Pastoral: Visions of the Countryside in 18th-Century Europe, an exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum, includes numerous examples of the craft, several of which have never before been shown at the museum. The centerpiece of the exhibit is a reconstructed bed with printed bedding and curtains. Printing the Pastoral continues through December 1 in gallery 100 at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Admission is free. 314-721-0072

Dutch Paintings in the Age of Rembrandt

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 12


The Netherlands gained independence from Spain during the brutal and grueling 80 Years War, which was followed by the Dutch Golden Age. Its ports, wind power and sailing prowess kindled a financial engine that powered the new country into the forefront of banking and trade; and with that windfall of money came the rise of the Dutch school of portrait painters. Rembrandt van Rijn, Frans Hals and Aeltje Uylenburgh all created masterpieces in this period of prosperity. Dutch Paintings in the Age of Rembrandt, the new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), showcases 70 paintings on loan from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, that demonstrate the Dutch mastery of portraiture, landscape and genre painting (paintings depicting stories with a moral). The exhibit opens Sunday, October 20, and remains on display through January 12. Tickets are $6 to $15 (but free on Friday), and the museum is open every day except Monday and major holidays. 314-721-0072

The Shape of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection

Through March 8, 2020, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.


The Shape of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection presents 40 abstract paintings, drawings, and prints by acclaimed black artists drawn from and celebrating the transformative gift of the Thelma and Bert Ollie Memorial Art Collection. In 2017, Ollie and his wife Monique gifted the Museum with 81 abstract works in honor of his parents, a collection that has added depth and breadth to the Museum’s holdings of works by black artists. 314.721.0072

Kristen Peterson - Visual Delights: Photographs and Altered Books

Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m., Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and Tuesdays, 12-8 p.m. Continues through Feb. 1
The Sheldon 3648 Washington Blvd., St. Louis St. Louis - Grand Center

Buy TicketsAdmission is Free


Incorporating Xerox transfers, gel, paint, various forms of photography, and ephemera such as tickets, ribbon, feathers, jewels, glitter and more, Kristen Peterson’s journals, altered books and photographs give the viewer an intimate look at her life experiences. Peterson’s photos have been published in Esquire, People, Time and Actual, and she has exhibited at The National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington D.C. The exhibition is sponsored by Mr. Ryan C. Easley. 314-533-9900

It’s Not You, It’s Me: A Declaration of Independence

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through Oct. 30
The Sheldon 3648 Washington Blvd., St. Louis St. Louis - Grand Center

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For the exhibition It's Not You, It's Me: A Declaration of Independence, curator and fashion designer Michael Drummond selected fiber artists who use their art to address issues of gender and identity through the media of fashion. Body-disguising fabrics, masks, gender-bending and other similar ideas are explored in the show, which opens with a free reception from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, October 4, at the Sheldon (3648 Washington Boulevard; www.thesheldon.org). The show is presented in conjunction with the citywide show Innovations in Textiles and features work by Nina Ganci, Larry Krone and Yvonne Osei, among others. It's Not You, It's Me remains on display through November 30, and the gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday. 314-533-9900

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