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Arts & Theater This Weekend

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The Coming Out Play Festival

Fri., Oct. 19, 7 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 20, 4:30 & 8 p.m.
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There is no road map for coming out to your friends and parents, because every person and situation is different. Telling people who you really are can be traumatic, joyous or a bit of a letdown — anything can happen. The Q Collective, a new local theater company, makes its debut with a showcase of short plays about the experience. The Coming Out Play Festival features six fifteen-minute plays, with subjects including two friends, soon to be separated by college, who wonder if their friendship will survive ("Where the Fireworks Come From"); a young woman who has to explain to her mother why she's called off her wedding ("Something Old"); and the fallout from one man's failed attempt to come out during his mother's Christmas Eve party ("Baby Black Jesus: Part Four"). All six plays are performed at 7 p.m. Friday and 4:30 and 8 p.m. Saturday (October 19 and 20) at the Monocle (4510 Manchester Avenue; www.theqcollective.theater). Tickets are $15 to $20. $15-$20

The Monocle (map)
4510 Manchester Ave
St. Louis - The Grove
phone 314-935-7003
The Coming Out Play Festival

Redemption of a Dogg

Fri., Oct. 19, 8 p.m.

Snoop Dogg has been many things in his life: a uniquely talented rapper, a compelling narrator for short nature documentaries, a reggae performer and even Martha Stewart's co-host. But now he's taking a stab at live theater. Working with writer/producer/director Je'caryous Johnson, Snoop has crafted the play Redemption of a Dogg. Snoop plays a man who chases fame and fortune at the expense of his family. When he wises up, he recognizes his mistakes and attempts to make amends by placing his family first and his career second. Redemption of a Dogg stars Snoop, Tamar Braxton and a selection of songs culled from Snoop Dogg's 25 years in the music business. The play is performed at 8 p.m. Friday, October 19, at the Stifel Theatre (1400 Market Street; www.stifeltheatre.com). Tickets are $59.50 to $99.50. $59.50-$99.50

Buy Tickets
Stifel Theatre (map)
1400 Market St
St. Louis - Downtown
phone 314-499-7600
Redemption of a Dogg

Kehinde Wiley: Saint Louis

Fridays and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays. Continues through Feb. 10, 2019

Artist Kehinde Wiley leaped into the public consciousness when his presidential portrait of Barack Obama was unveiled in February, but he's been making vital work that explores the nexus of race and representation for years. In 2017 the New York City-based Wiley visited the Saint Louis Art Museum to review the collection with an eye toward a future exhibit inspired by the historic style of portraiture. While he was in St. Louis, Wiley went to north St. Louis and Ferguson to meet with people and find subjects for his own paintings. Kehinde Wiley: Saint Louis is an exhibition of eleven large-scale paintings of everyday black St. Louisans dressed in modern clothing, posed in the manner of kings, statesmen and other powerful figures. Wiley's new work will be on display in galleries 249 and 250 from October 19 to February 10 at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Admission is free. free admission

The Immigrants: Works by Master Photographers

Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, 12-8 p.m. Continues through Jan. 12, 2019

America's long history of welcoming new arrivals to Team USA is celebrated in the exhibition The Immigrants: Works by Master Photographers. From the earliest days of photography in the 1890s, when Ellis Island clerk Augustus Frederick Sherman began documenting immigrants with his camera, to today, when Italian photographer Alex Majoli captures the crisis of refugees trying to survive the ocean crossing from Africa to Greece, the exhibit shows the people who fled their homes in search of safety. The Immigrants doesn't shy away from the worst moments; Dorothea Lange's suppressed photograph of Japanese Americans in a U.S. internment camp during World War II is part of the show, as are more ennobling images made by Lewis Hine and Bob Gruen. The Immigrants opens with a free reception from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, October 5, at the Sheldon (3648 Washington Boulevard; www.thesheldon.org). The show remains up through January 12. free admission

Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900
The Immigrants: Works by Master Photographers

Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico

Wednesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Fridays, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through Feb. 16, 2019

Lola Álvarez Bravo was a Mexican artist, educator and curator whose life spanned nearly the entire twentieth century. From the 1930s to the 1970s, Álvarez Bravo crisscrossed her way across the country with camera in hand, creating portraits of other working artists. Always shooting, she also made images of regular people and the architecture — both old and new — at a time when Mexico was rapidly growing and transforming. Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico, the new exhibition at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation (3716 Washington Boulevard; www.pulitzerarts.org), features more than 40 of her black-and-white photographs in all their glory. Picturing Mexico opens with a free reception from 6 to 9 p.m. on Friday, September 14. Also debuting the same night are more than 60 sculptures by Ruth Asawa, who often worked with wire. Both shows remain on display through February 16. The Pulitzer is open Wednesday through Saturday. free admission

Pulitzer Arts Foundation (map)
3716 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-754-1850
Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico

Flora Borealis

Thursdays-Saturdays, 6 p.m. Continues through Oct. 20
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Summers in St. Louis are no picnic, what with the brutal heat and oppressive humidity. At night conditions improve a bit, and that's the time to get outside and experience the city. The Missouri Botanical Garden (4344 Shaw Boulevard; www.mobot.org) takes full advantage of the nocturnal respite with Flora Borealis, a nighttime-only special exhibition. Thanks to the artistic and technical brilliance of AVI Systems Inc., a section of the garden is temporarily transformed into a new experience with active lights, moving images and sounds that alter and enhance the familiar landscape. Tickets for Flora Borealis are $10 to $25 and are sold for specific time slots each night (Thursday through Tuesday through August 26). While you're waiting for your scheduled time you can take advantage of MoBOT’s new tented biergarten, which features live entertainment on select nights. $10-$25

Sanford Biggers and Basquiat Before Basquiat: East 12th Street, 1979-1980

Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through Dec. 30

The Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis opens some of the most ambitious and vital shows in its history this month, with a series of exhibitions by, and about, black artists and the black experience. Sanford Biggers works directly with the materials of his forebearers — quilts and African sculptures — only he reshapes and repurposes them as contemporary statements about black identity, history and trauma. Biggers gives found quilts new life with new handwork, encoding personal messages into their original pattern. The fact that the work of an anonymous black craftsman or woman now appears in galleries and museums around the world, even in Biggers' modified form, is both subversive and celebratory. With wooden sculptures, some of which are copies, he dips them in wax and then works them over with firearms. What begins as a statue of a human or human-shaped supernatural being becomes obscured, disfigured and unrecognizable through the violence wrought upon it.

In addition to Biggers' work, CAM presents a show of the private photos of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Basquiat emerged from the New York City hip-hop/punk/graffiti scenes in the 1970s as one-half of the graffiti duo SAMO, along with Al Diaz. The pair together tagged buildings with cryptic phrases denouncing the establishment, politics and religion, always signed "SAMO" (an acronym for "Same Old Shit"). When the duo broke up, Basquiat performed in the noise rock band Test Pattern (later named "Gray") with Vincent Gallo and Michael Holman. He lived on the streets, sold drugs and experimented with Xerox art, painting and drawing. Basquiat Before Basquiat: East 12th Street, 1979-1980 will showcase everything the artist made while living in a small East Village apartment with his friend Alexis Adler before he hit the big time. It's a treasure trove of paintings, sculptures and works on paper, as well as Adler's photographs of his friend.

Both exhibitions open with a free reception from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, September 7, at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org). The shows continue through December 30.

free admission

Silent Sky

Sundays, 2 p.m. and Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Nov. 4

Henrietta Leavitt has questions about deep space and Earth's place and role in the universe, so she gets a job at the Harvard Observatory in hopes of finding satisfying answers. Instead, she's confronted by the unsatisfactory reality that women aren't allowed to use the telescope. Her dream job turns out to be grunt work, as she's expected to catalog all the stars revealed on the telescope's photographic plates while men pursue the business of discovery. Yet women are capable of seeing what men cannot, and in those plates Leavitt finds something no one else has noticed, breaking new ground in astronomy. Lauren Gunderson's play Silent Sky charts the lives and work of early-twentieth-century female astronomers and how they defied the odds to do great work in an age when society mostly demanded they stay out of the way and procreate. Insight Theatre Company closes its current season with Silent Sky. Performances are at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday (October 19 to November 4) at the Kranzberg Arts Center (501 North Grand Boulevard; www.insighttheatrecompany.com). Tickets are $15 to $35. $15-$35

Buy Tickets
Kranzberg Arts Center (map)
501 N Grand Blvd
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-0367
Silent Sky

Evil Dead the Musical

Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Oct. 27
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What happens if you take the comedic-horror stylings of Sam Raimi's Evil Dead 2 and smash it into the modern musical? You get Evil Dead the Musical, which grafts an emotional arc and frequent song breaks onto the gory, nightmarish story of a group of stock-character teenagers who find an unholy book and with it awaken demonic forces. Over the course of one night they're possessed, tormented and ultimately destroyed. And when one of them is slain, the rest sing about their fear while making crass comments. Stray Dog Theatre has mounted the horribly funny show twice before to great acclaim, and now the company brings it back by popular demand. If you're really into it you can buy tickets for the splatter zone. It comes with a souvenir white T-shirt, which will be mostly red by the end of the show. Performances are at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday (October 11 to 27) at the Tower Grove Abbey (2336 Tennessee Avenue; www.straydogtheatre.org). Tickets are $25 to $45. $25-$45

Tower Grove Abbey (map)
2336 Tennessee Ave.
St. Louis - South Grand
phone 314-865-1995
Evil Dead the Musical

The Tempest

Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m. Continues through Oct. 21

The Tempest is a story of betrayal, magic, revenge and redemption — and in St. Louis Shakespeare's new production of the show, the main characters are all women. Prospera is the rightful Duke of Milan, but her ambitious sister Antonia effectively banished her to a remote island. With daughter Miranda for company, Prospera has mastered the use of magic to the point where their lives are comfortable even if not as luxurious as home would be. When Prospera realizes that her usurper and the complicit king are on a nearby ship, she raises a storm that wrecks them on the same treacherous isle and magically wreaks her revenge. Shakespeare's The Tempest presents great challenges to a theater company: How do you effectively convey a dangerous storm at sea and the destruction of a ship on stage? How do you represent the use of magic? Patrick Siler, who is scheduled to direct St. Louis Shakespeare's October production of the show, has a talent for making the mundane become magical. It should be a show to remember. Performances are at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday (October 12 to 21) at the Ivory Theatre (7620 Michigan Avenue; www.stlshakespeare.org). Tickets are $15 to $20. $15-$20

Ivory Theatre (map)
7620 Michigan Ave.
St. Louis - South City
phone 314-631-8330
The Tempest

The Zombies of Penzance

Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Oct. 20
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Gilbert and Sullivan's The Zombies of Penzance, or At Night Come the Flesh Eaters, never made it to stage during the duo's lifetimes. The musical was rejected by their publisher, so they reluctantly rewrote it as The Pirates of Penzance. The original was lost to history — until, that is, St. Louis-based theater impresario Scott Miller found a few sections of the original score and libretto. With composer John Gerdes, he has reconstructed a version of The Zombies of Penzance. Major-General Stanley is a retired zombie hunter, and when a coterie of zombies arrive in the neighborhood he forbids any of his many daughters from marrying even a single one. Is the old man going to be forced out of retirement and back into the head-crushing game? Find out when New Line Theatre presents The Zombies of Penzance. Shows are at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday (September 27 to October 20) at the Marcelle Theater (3310 Samuel Shepard Drive; www.newlinetheatre.org). Tickets are $20 to $30. $20-$30

Marcelle Theater (map)
3310 Samuel Shepard Dr
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-0367
The Zombies of Penzance

The Rocky Horror Show

Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m. Continues through Oct. 28
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Richard O'Brien's Rocky Horror Show is eternal because there's always another generation that's ready for its message of choosing personal joy over blind conformity. The Washington University Performing Arts Department ushers a new version into the world with its season-opening production of the Halloween favorite. See straight-laced Brad and Janet set off on a drive to visit their old science teacher (romantic, Brad), only to break down outside a very odd castle. Inside, pansexual freakazoid Dr. Frank-N-Furter is about to breathe life into the perfect man, but he'll make time for (and with) Brad and Janet. But something is rotten in Frank-N-Furter Castle. Will Brad and Janet survive their wild night? Performances are at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday (October 19 to 28) at Washington University's Edison Theatre (6445 Forsyth Boulevard; www.edison.wustl.edu). Tickets are $15 to $20. $15-$20

Buy Tickets
Edison Theatre (map)
6445 Forsyth Blvd.
Clayton
phone 314-935-6543
The Rocky Horror Show

A Doll's House, Part 2

Saturdays, 4 p.m., Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m., Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 7 p.m., Sundays, 2 p.m., Saturdays, 4 & 8 p.m., Wed., Oct. 31, 1:30 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 4, 2 & 7 p.m. Continues through Nov. 4

Henrik Ibsen's classic drama A Doll's House ends with Nora Helmer walking out on her husband and family so that she can live an independent life. This was a shocking, scandalous ending for a play in 1879, but it's less so in the modern era. In Lucas Hnath's A Doll's House, Part 2, Nora returns after fifteen years of traveling, affairs and work. But what does she want? Her dutiful and somewhat dull husband Torvald would certainly like to know. Their youngest child, Emmy, is recently engaged, and neither father nor daughter wants this reminder of a failed marriage around. Is it possible Nora didn't find the freedom she wanted? The Repertory Theatre St. Louis continues its season with A Doll's House, Part 2. Performances are Tuesday through Sunday (October 10 to November 4) at the Loretto-Hilton Center (130 Edgar Road; www.repstl.org). Tickets are $19 to $92. $19-$92

Weavers' Guild Sale

Fri., Oct. 19, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 20, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
phone 314-495-2740
gaglidden@aol.com
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This juried sale features 40+ fiber artists selling their original handcrafted items: weavers, spinners, basket-makers, papermakers, hand-felters, dyers, jewelers, hat-makers, fiber sculptors, tatters, bobbin lace makers, rug hookers and more! Thousands of items including one-of-kind garments and accessories, jewelry, handwoven kitchen towels, rugs, placemats, baskets, fiber sculptures, note cards, journals, and unique holiday ornaments! Something for everyone! Distinctive gifts for holiday shopping. free admission

https://www.weaversguildstl.org/guild-sale.html

City/Cité St. Louis: Performances by Amala Dianor and Treasure Shields Redmond

Fri., Oct. 19, 7:30-9 p.m.
phone 314-754-1850
khasler@pulitzerarts.org
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French choreographer and dancer Amala Dianor will perform his solo work Man Rec (2014) at the Pulitzer, in conjunction with a performance by St. Louis-based poet Treasure Shields Redmond with musical accompaniment by Aysia BerLynn as a part of City/Cité St. Louis. This event is free and open to the public; seating is limited. free

https://pulitzerarts.org/program/city-cite-st-louis-performances-by-amala-dianor-and-treasure-shields-redmond/
Pulitzer Arts Foundation (map)
3716 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-754-1850
City/Cité St. Louis: Performances by Amala Dianor and Treasure Shields Redmond
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