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Graphic Revolution: American Prints 1960 to Now

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Feb. 3, 2019

The 1960s were a period of social upheaval and radical change in America, and no art form captured that churning spirit better than printmaking. Printmakers have always had one foot in the commercial art world and one in the realm of fine art, and that hybrid nature allows them to adapt to new technologies and new thinking more quickly than, say, sculptors. Graphic Revolution: American Prints 1960 to Now, the exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), is a treasure trove of startling images. Featuring more than 100 works drawn from the museum's holdings and local private collectors, Graphic Revolution includes landmark prints by the big names (Andy Warhol's Campbell's Soup II, Robert Rauschenberg's Signs) and less famous but no less astonishing pieces by modern masters such as Julie Mehretu and Edgar Heap of Birds. The show is open from Sunday, November 11, to February 3. Tickets are $6 to $14, but free to all on Friday. $6-$14, free on Friday

Kehinde Wiley: Saint Louis

Fridays and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays. Continues through Feb. 10, 2019

Artist Kehinde Wiley leaped into the public consciousness when his presidential portrait of Barack Obama was unveiled in February, but he's been making vital work that explores the nexus of race and representation for years. In 2017 the New York City-based Wiley visited the Saint Louis Art Museum to review the collection with an eye toward a future exhibit inspired by the historic style of portraiture. While he was in St. Louis, Wiley went to north St. Louis and Ferguson to meet with people and find subjects for his own paintings. Kehinde Wiley: Saint Louis is an exhibition of eleven large-scale paintings of everyday black St. Louisans dressed in modern clothing, posed in the manner of kings, statesmen and other powerful figures. Wiley's new work will be on display in galleries 249 and 250 from October 19 to February 10 at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Admission is free. free admission

Into the Breeches

Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through Nov. 18

As World War II rages in Europe and the Pacific, a group of St. Louis women have to keep the home fires burning. Those fires don't just burn wood, though; the ladies all miss going to the theater. With the men at war and the theaters closed for the duration, an idea is hatched. It's time for a new production of Henry V, with an all-female cast storming Agincourt. George Brant's comedy Into the Breeches! makes its St. Louis debut as part of Shakespeare Festival St. Louis' In the Works program. The family-friendly play A Most Outrageous Fit of Madness (inspired by The Comedy of Errors) and two staged readings of Michael Saenz's The Thousand Natural Shocks round out the program. Into the Breeches! runs Wednesday through Sunday (October 28 to November 18) at the Grandel Theatre (3610 Grandel Square; www.sfstl.com). Tickets are $25 to $55. $25-$55

Grandel Theatre (map)
3610 Grandel Square
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-0367
Into the Breeches

Sanford Biggers and Basquiat Before Basquiat: East 12th Street, 1979-1980

Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through Dec. 30

The Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis opens some of the most ambitious and vital shows in its history this month, with a series of exhibitions by, and about, black artists and the black experience. Sanford Biggers works directly with the materials of his forebearers — quilts and African sculptures — only he reshapes and repurposes them as contemporary statements about black identity, history and trauma. Biggers gives found quilts new life with new handwork, encoding personal messages into their original pattern. The fact that the work of an anonymous black craftsman or woman now appears in galleries and museums around the world, even in Biggers' modified form, is both subversive and celebratory. With wooden sculptures, some of which are copies, he dips them in wax and then works them over with firearms. What begins as a statue of a human or human-shaped supernatural being becomes obscured, disfigured and unrecognizable through the violence wrought upon it.

In addition to Biggers' work, CAM presents a show of the private photos of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Basquiat emerged from the New York City hip-hop/punk/graffiti scenes in the 1970s as one-half of the graffiti duo SAMO, along with Al Diaz. The pair together tagged buildings with cryptic phrases denouncing the establishment, politics and religion, always signed "SAMO" (an acronym for "Same Old Shit"). When the duo broke up, Basquiat performed in the noise rock band Test Pattern (later named "Gray") with Vincent Gallo and Michael Holman. He lived on the streets, sold drugs and experimented with Xerox art, painting and drawing. Basquiat Before Basquiat: East 12th Street, 1979-1980 will showcase everything the artist made while living in a small East Village apartment with his friend Alexis Adler before he hit the big time. It's a treasure trove of paintings, sculptures and works on paper, as well as Adler's photographs of his friend.

Both exhibitions open with a free reception from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, September 7, at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org). The shows continue through December 30.

free admission

Every Brilliant Thing

Sundays, 7 p.m. and Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Dec. 2

The unnamed child at the center of Duncan Macmillan's one-person show Every Brilliant Thing is only seven when her mother first attempts suicide. She takes it upon herself to create a list of worthwhile things in life, hoping her mother will find comfort in them and stop trying to die. She writes her favorites on numbered slips of paper ("1654. Christopher Walken's voice." "2001. Films that are better than the books they are adapted from"), and leaves them around the house for Mom to find. She grows to realize the list can help herself as well; depression is hereditary, after all. R-S Theatrics presents the life-affirming Every Brilliant Thing at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 7 p.m. Sunday (November 16 to December 2) at the Kranzberg Arts Center (501 North Grand Boulevard; www.r-stheatrics.com). Tickets are $18 to $20. $18-$20

Buy Tickets
Kranzberg Arts Center (map)
501 N Grand Blvd
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-0367
Every Brilliant Thing

The Great Seduction

Sundays, 2 p.m. Continues through Nov. 18

The great Alexandre Dumas began his writing career in the theater as a dramatist, with the occasional comedy as well. His Mademoiselle de Belle Isle was a five-act farce about lovers and a seduction contest. Vladimir Zelevinsky has loosely adapted and condensed the story down to a more manageable length in the two-act comedy, The Great Seduction. It's about a duke and countess who are paramours (but not exclusive), and Gabrielle, a fresh country girl just arrived in Paris. The duke is immediately taken with her, while the countess has set her sights on the handsome Raoul. Incensed by the young competitor's presence, the duke bets Raoul he can seduce the first woman he sees. Care to guess who shows up? (It's Raoul's fiancee, Gabrielle.) West End Players Guild presents the bedroom farce The Great Seduction at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday (November 9 to 18) at the Union Avenue Christian Church (733 North Union Boulevard; www.westendplayers.org). Tickets are $20 to $25. $20-$25

Into the Breeches

Sun., Nov. 18, 2 p.m.

Building on its beloved summer productions in Forest Park and the acclaimed Shakespeare in the Streets program, the Festival now presents its very first season of contemporary American plays by writers in dialogue with Shakespeare, headlined by the regional premiere of Into the Breeches! Written by the award-winning playwright of Grounded, which starred Anne Hathaway in its New York run, Into the Breeches! is a hilarious and heartwarming look at the WWII home front and a group of ladies who band together to keep the local theater going with their very own production of Henry V. $20-40

https://www.sfstl.com/in-the-works/
Buy Tickets
Grandel Theatre (map)
3610 Grandel Square
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-0367
Into the Breeches

Ken Haller

Sun., Nov. 18, 7-8:30 p.m.
phone 314-725-4200 ext. 10
contact@licketytix.com

Happy Haller Days! Marty Fox, piano and Music Director In his take on the holidays, Ken is surprising, funny personal, moving, great company and just a little exasperating. Just like all our holidays. Best St. Louis Cabaret Performer 2015 - The GO! List, St. Louis Post-Dispatch $30, $35

http://www.gaslightcabaretfestival.com/event.php?ID=489
Buy Tickets

Riverbend Public Art

Through Dec. 21, 2-5 p.m.
mkellerpaint@gmail.com
,

Riverbend, a public art installation, opens at the Gateway Arch National Park September 22, 2-5pm with activity for kids and adults, the Sappington Creek Bluegrass Band and food trucks. The 100-foot-long artwork, made of silver, mirror-like material that references the Arch, shows the navigable Missouri River, highlighting it as the primary means of Westward Expansion and Gateway to the West for Lewis and Clark and many others. Riverbend will represent the confluence with the Mississippi on the east and extend westward. Artist Margaret Keller won the Critical Mass for the Visual Arts Public Works Project commission to create this artwork. Free

http://www.margarekellerstudio.com
Gateway Arch (map)
200 Washington Ave.
St. Louis - Riverfront
phone 877-982-1410
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