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Imagery of Chess: St. Louis Artists

Wednesdays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Mondays, Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 17

In 1944 Marcel Duchamp, Julien Levy and Max Ernst organized The Imagery of Chess, an exhibition of chess sets reimagined by artists and performers. Their hope was that people's vision of the chess board and pieces would be expanded beyond the then-accepted options of either the classic Staunton design or the "French" set. In 2016, the World Chess Hall of Fame exhibited some of the works from the 1944 show to acknowledge the debt owed to those artists for forever altering the look of chess. Imagery of Chess: St. Louis Artists is the new follow-up exhibit, which invites twenty local artists to have their way with the game pieces. Among those participating are Eugenia Alexander, who cites the Afrofuturism movement as a key influence on her work; fashion designer and Project Runway vet Michael Drummond; and Yuka Suga, a glass and metals artist who also works as a therapist. A second, simultaneous show, Pow! Capturing Superheroes, Chess & Comics, showcases more than 200 chess-themed comic books (you'd be surprised by how many super villains play chess to keep their minds sharp for optimal intricate scheming functionality). There are also superhero-themed chess boards and a comic book reading room. Both exhibitions open a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, March 23, at the World Chess Hall of Fame (4652 Maryland Avenue; www.worldchesshof.org). Imagery of Chess continues through September 14. Pow! remains up through September 17. Admission is a suggested $5 donation. $5 suggested donation

A Century of Japanese Prints

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 28, 2018

Japan had a long history of woodblock printing (ukiyo-e) that, although now recognized for their artistic qualities, were at the time purely commercial works. That began to change in the mid-nineteenth century, as Japanese artists were exposed to Western printmaking. These early modern artists began the creative print movement, which was motivated by a desire to explore the artistic possibilities of Japan's traditional hand-carved woodblock printing methods. Artists such as Kobayakawa Kiyoshi and Hashiguchi Goyō created portraits of modern Japanese society in prints that are both beautiful works of art and incredible documents of an era. The Saint Louis Art Museum displays a treasure trove of them in the new exhibit, A Century of Japanese Prints. The show opens on Friday, August 11, and remains up through January 28. Admission is free. free admission

The Hats of Stephen Jones

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3
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You may not recognize Stephen Jones by name, but you've most likely seen his work. The English milliner's creations have been worn by trend-setting celebrities for more than 30 years, from Princess Diana to Lady Gaga. A selection of eight of his avant-garde hats are displayed at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org) in Hats of Stephen Jones, a complementary exhibition to the ongoing exhibition Degas, Impressionism, and the Paris Millinery Trade. Jones' exhibit will remain up from Friday, April 21 to Sunday, September 3. At 2 p.m. Sunday, April 23, Jones visits the museum to discuss his work and his inspirations with New York milliner Jennifer Ouellette. Admission to the lecture is $20 to $25; exhibition admission is $6 to $15. $6-$15

In the Realm of Trees

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3

Classical Chinese artists often used trees as inspirations or the focus of their works. Trees and the natural world are the focus of the new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), In the Realm of Trees, which includes photographs, paintings and decorative works that glorify the beauty found in nature. The centerpiece of the show is a set of contemporary photographs called Sacred Tree on Mount Lu, made by Beijing-based photographer Michael Cherney, which was acquired for the museum's permanent collection in 2016 and will be presented for the first time in this exhibit. In the Realm of Trees opens on Friday, March 10, and remains up through Sunday, September 3, in gallery 225. The gallery is open Tuesday through Sunday, and admission is free. free admission

New Media Series: Amy Granat

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Nov. 12

In the nineteenth century the American Dream was tied up in Manifest Destiny. We would spread across the continent from the East to the West on foot, by wagon or train. Once the West was won, the dream changed and became nice home, a fast car and an open road. But what is the American Dream today, when we cover the land from to sea to sea and all frontiers are gone? Amy Granat's Cars, Trees, Houses, Beaches is a silent 16mm film loop of Hawaiian beaches, muscle cars and modernist homes, among them Kirkwood's own Russell and Ruth Goetz Krauss house, which was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The film ruminates on these conquered frontiers, many of which are once again the stuff of dreams for Americans. The Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org) presents Granat's film as part of its long-running New Media Series. It shows on an endless loop from July 14 to November 12 in gallery 301. Admission is free, and the museum is open every day except Monday. free admission

Jennifer Colten: Higher Ground

Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 26

Back in the old days, the insanities of racism and segregation kept black people and white people out of the same graveyards. Washington Park Cemetery was for many years the largest final resting place for black St. Louis. Its proximity to Lambert St. Louis International Airport doomed it, however. Highway 70 ran through the middle of the cemetery in the 1950s, and more bodies were moved in the '90s when MetroLink tracks were laid and the airport expanded. Photographer Jennifer Colten documented the current state of the cemetery for the new multimedia exhibition Higher Ground: Honoring Washington Park Cemetery, Its People and Place. Her large-scale, color photographs are supported by historical documentation, video and oral histories (by Denise Ward-Brown) and an art installation by Dail Chambers, all toward the goal of illuminating the racial politics and tangled history behind a black cemetery’s sacrifice in the name of progress. free admission

Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900
Jennifer Colten:  Higher Ground

Emily Oliver: Weaving as Ritual and Art

Sundays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3

Emily Oliver's work in Weaving as Ritual and Art is deceptively sparse. Her widely spaced color bars and shapes only look that way because you're thinking like a painter; all the white space in her weaving requires as much work as the colored bits, after all. Oliver's new exhibition Weaving as Ritual and Art alludes to early Modernist painters through her use of negative space and isolated color, but her work also hews to the pattern-making that comprises traditional textile arts. The exhibition opens with a free reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, July 7, at the Dark Room (3610 Grandel Square; www.thedarkroomstl.com). The show remains up through September 3. free admission

The Dark Room (map)
3610 Grandel Square
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-776-9550
Emily Oliver: Weaving as Ritual and Art

Reigning Men: Fashion in Menswear 1715-2015

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through Sept. 17
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It was the poet-philosopher Billy Gibbons who first posited that "every girl is crazy 'bout a sharp-dressed man," and yet on the whole, American men have settled for athletic team logos and cargo shorts. But there's more to life than five-pocket shorts and t-shirts. Reigning Men: Fashion in Menswear 1715-2015, the new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), celebrates the beauty and style that's available to men. The show traces development of the suit from its origins as a military uniform through the heavily embroidered great coats of the nineteenth century, with a detour into the effectiveness of the black leather jacket before finishing up with modern sartorial splendors. Reigning Men is open Tuesday through Saturday (June 25 to September 17), and admission is $6 to $15, but the show is free on Friday. $6-$15, free on Friday

Birthday Bash Exhibition

Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 31
phone 314-402-1959
greendoorartgallery@aol.com

Green Door art gallery presents “Birthday Bash" Reception Friday, July 7, 2017 from 5-9 pm featuring Alicia Farris’ watercolor paintings, fiber art by Annie Scheumbauer, Mark Hurd’s brightly colored urban scenes, paintings by Vesna Delevska and jewelry by Julie Bell, Ellen Klamon and Pam Bohling, plus artwork by 30 other artists-Artwork available from July 5 until August 31, 2017. Located at 21 N. Gore, Webster Groves MO 63119 near St. Louis 314-402-1959 www.GreenDoorartgallery.com/events free

http://www.greendoorartgallery.com
Green Door Art Gallery (map)
21 N. Gore Ave.
Webster Groves
phone 314-402-1959
Birthday Bash Exhibition

Painting Missouri: The Counties en Plein Air

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 5-8 p.m. Continues through Sept. 2
phone 314-727-6266
media@stlouisartistsguild.org

The St. Louis Artists' Guild is pleased to present the entire collection of 115 original oil paintings by Billyo O'Donnell for the Painting Missouri exhibition opening July 28 through September 2, 2017. The Painting Missouri: The Counties en Plein Air book features historical descriptions and regional stories by author Karen Glines.

http://www.stlouisartistsguild.org/new/node/2545
St. Louis Artists' Guild (map)
12 N Jackson Ave
Clayton
phone 314-727-6266

Ferguson Voices: Disrupting the Frame

Through Aug. 31, 9 a.m.-9 p.m.
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The people of Ferguson have a story to tell - and one that the majority of those in the United States have not heard or fully understood. The stories and images captured in "Ferguson Voices: Disrupting the Frame" exhibit are a testament not only to the systemic discrimination that the Ferguson protests laid bare, but also to the power of transformative action taken to foster community, accountability and justice. The exhibit opens with a free reception from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, August 3, and is available to view during the regular Schlafly Branch hours from August 1 - 31, 2017. Free

https://www.facebook.com/moralcourageproject/

Jason Hailey: The Selective Eye-Photography as Abstraction

Through Nov. 4, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
phone 314-535-1999
patty.wente@iphf.org
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Jason Hailey’s passion to increase visual awareness and heighten sensitivity to aesthetic values flow from his abstract interpretations of commonplace products and discarded debris. The dramatic transformations are pioneering works of abstract color photography, aggrandizing the world of fine art photography. With inspiration from our changing environment and society, Hailey’s style of photographing his raw realities will stimulate, shock, and spark our imaginations for new ideas, change, and progress. The IPHF is a non-profit organization whose purpose is to celebrate the achievements of the inventors, pioneers, and pivotal artists throughout the history of photography. $5 Adults; $3 Seniors & Students; Free Members & under 18

http://www.iphf.org
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