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Gateway Men's Chorus: We Will Rise

Sat., March 17, 8 p.m.

The Gateway Men's Chorus takes a stand for the civil rights of minorities with its spring concert, We Will Rise. The heart of the show is Joel Thompson's sobering composition, Seven Last Words of the Unarmed. Using the structure of Joseph Haydn's Seven Last Words of Christ, the piece takes the final words or communiques of seven black men (Michael Brown, Amadou Diallo, Kenneth Chamberlain, Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant, John Crawford and Eric Garner) killed by armed authorities and weaves them throughout the music, which incorporates the old French tune "L'homme Armé" (the Armed Man). It is both a protest song and a cry of outrage. We Will Rise is performed at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday (March 16 and 17) at Union Avenue Christian Church (733 North Euclid Avenue; Tickets are $20 to $25. $20-$25

Gateway Men's Chorus: We Will Rise

Sat., March 17, 8-10 p.m.
phone 314-287-5669

Gateway Men's Chorus turns the spotlight on the socio-political events and issues impacting disenfranchised communities and minorities through the United States, and more specifically, here in Saint Louis. This moving and educational program takes a hard look at issues impacting our city and our world, including: transgender rights, systemic violence and oppression suffered by African-Americans, and the stigmas surrounding mental illness and suicide. Featuring the Saint Louis debut of Joel Thompson's "Seven Last Words of the Unarmed", this concert is a must-see event that will have Saint Louis talking for years to come. $25 General Admission, $20 Students/Seniors
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Vivian Maier: Photography's Lost Voice

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 26

Vivian Maier burst onto the art scene in 2007 with her treasure trove of urban photography. It was quite a feat for an 81-year-old, but even more so because most of her work was of mid-century New York and Chicago, and she had ceased making images a decade earlier. Also, she didn't ever show her work herself; filmmaker John Maloof bought a crate of negatives at auction and in it discovered her vast archive. He has spent years printing and scanning these negatives to bring her work to the public eye. Vivian Maier: Photography's Lost Voice, the new exhibition at the International Photography Hall of Fame and Museum (3415 Olive Street;, offers St. Louis the rare opportunity to see Maier's work up close. The show includes her black-and-white urban images, her later color abstract work and examples of her landscape portraiture. Vivian Maier: Photography's Lost Voice is on display Wednesday through Saturday (February 21 to May 26). Admission is $5 to $10. $5-$10

Anything Goes

Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through March 24

Cole Porter's musical confection Anything Goes is a fizzy farce that fills a steamship with gangsters, televangelists and high society, and then points them out to sea. New Line Theatre artistic director Scott Miller views the show as something far more tart: In his eyes it's a satire of America's penchant for glorifying criminals and talentless pretty people, and the practice of religion as a commercial pursuit. With that in mind, New Line Theatre's new production of Anything Goes will use the 1962 version of the show (P.G. Wodehouse worked on that script) and will take aim at some very tender targets. Anything Goes is performed at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday (March 1 to 24) at the Marcelle Theatre (3310 Samuel Shepard Drive; Tickets are $15 to $25. $15-$25

Marcelle Theater (map)
3310 Samuel Shepard Dr
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-0367
Anything Goes

As It Is in Heaven

Sundays, 2 p.m. and Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through March 31

The Shakers were a Protestant group who believed in celibacy, gender segregation and the benefits of hard work (the celibacy rule eventually led to a dramatic thinning of their numbers). In rural Kentucky in the 1920s, the hard work is left unfinished when three newcomers to the women's section of the community announce they've been visited by angels. Instead of ushering in rejoicing, these purported visitations spark doubt and disbelief, a dangerous combination in a religious, utopian community. Arlene Hutton's As It Is in Heaven features an all-female cast and single-melody songs, and it explores questions of faith, the plight of women and the nature of belief. Mustard Seed Theatre presents the play at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday (March 15 to 31) at the Fontbonne Fine Arts Theater (6800 Wydown Boulevard; Tickets are $15 to $35. $15-$35

Fontbonne University Fine Arts Theatre (map)
6800 Wydown Blvd.
phone 314-862-3456
As It Is in Heaven

Born Yesterday

Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m., Sat., March 17, 4 p.m., Sun., March 18, 2 & 7 p.m., Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 7 p.m., Sat., March 24, 4 p.m., Sun., March 25, 2 p.m., Saturdays, 4 & 8 p.m., Sun., April 1, 2 p.m., Wed., April 4, 1:30 p.m. and Sun., April 8, 2 & 7 p.m. Continues through April 8

Harry Brock is in Washington D.C. on business, but then Harry's always on business. The cunning junk man has built an empire of garbage on crooked deals and cut-throat tactics, and he figures the only thing that will further enrich him is if he has a senator of his own on the payroll. As always, his girlfriend Billie has accompanied him, because he and Billie are linked by more than love. But Billie's brash manner and informal education (she's an ex-showgirl) make her a liability in the high-stakes world of government corruption, so Harry hires her a tutor in the form of journalist Paul Verrall. What he didn't count on is that Billie is ignorant, not stupid. Paul's teachings stick, and she recognize Harry is both immoral and dangerous -- not like the intelligent, morally upright Paul. Garson Kanin's comedy Born Yesterday was a big hit in 1946, and since our government is still corrupt and easily bought today, all the laughs remain intact 70 years later. The Repertory Theatre St. Louis closes its current season with Born Yesterday. Performances are Tuesday through Sunday (March 14 to April 8) at the Loretto-Hilton Center (130 Edgar Road; Tickets are $18.50 to $89. $18.50-$89


Mondays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through March 18

The humble teapot is a staple for ceramicists. They're functional and make good gifts (mothers love them), as well as allowing the artist to stretch creatively. A handle, a lid and a spout are the essential elements, but beyond that, anything goes. Identi-TEA: The Sixteenth Biennial Teapot exhibition at the Craft Alliance Center of Art + Design (6640 Delmar Boulevard, University City; features a wild and whimsical selection of teapots. The opening reception takes place from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, January 12, and the show continues through March 18. The gallery is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission is free. free admission

Dario Calmese: amongst friends.

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through March 31

Harlem preservationist Lana Turner is known for her collection of vintage fashions, among many other things. St. Louis-born artist Dario Calmese originally wanted to photograph her numerous hats, but quickly realized that Turner's personal style (she believes dressing is an artistic medium) should be captured in whole. Calmese photographed her in her Sunday best, tapping into the long black church tradition and Turner's own recreation of her identity through her savoir faire, which he fixed in black and white images. Calmese's photographs of Turner are partly theatrical, partly a statement of black identity, and they comprise his new exhibition, Dario Calmese: amongst friends. The show opens with a free public reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, February 16, at Projects+Gallery (4733 McPherson Avenue; At 1 p.m. Saturday, February 17, Calmese and Tuner discuss their collaboration at the gallery. Dario Calmese: amongst friends. remains up through March 31, and the gallery is open Wednesday through Saturday. free admission

Projects + Gallery (map)
4733 McPherson Ave
St. Louis - Central West End
phone 314-696-8678
Dario Calmese: amongst friends.

Tom Huck: Electric Baloneyland

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through March 31

For decades, St. Louis artist Tom Huck has been delighting and revolting the masses in equal parts with his beautifully grotesque woodcut prints. From his Evil Prints outpost on Washington Avenue, Huck creates incredibly intricate, satirical images that call to mind the best of the Garbage Pail Kids as passed through an Albrecht Dürer filter. His latest show, Electric Baloneyland, catalogs the downward trajectory of American society through the lens of a county fair in Huck's patented confrontational style. The exhibition makes its St. Louis debut this week with an opening reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, February 16, at the Duane Reed Gallery (4729 McPherson Avenue; The show continues through March 31. free admission

Duane Reed Gallery (map)
4729 McPherson Ave.
St. Louis - Central West End
phone 314-361-4100
Tom Huck: Electric Baloneyland

Ben Pierce: Ota Benga

Fridays, Saturdays, 12-3 p.m. Continues through March 31

The 1904 World's Fair still looms large in St. Louis' collective consciousness, but not everyone who attended had grand memories. A young Congolese man named Ota Benga was at the fair not as a visitor but as an exhibit. He was kidnapped and transported across the Middle Passage by a venal American some 40 years after the abolition of slavery, and then displayed as an example of the "subhuman" nature of black people. After the fair he was removed to a cage in the Bronx zoo, where he suffered even greater indignities. This sad and needlessly cruel moment in the twentieth century inspired local artist Ben Pierce's new show, Ota Benga. Pierce wondered how a man could reclaim his humanity after being treated in such an inhuman manner. His paintings of exotic birds transformed into ritual masks and sacred garb, which become both symbols of the secret self and of freedom from your true identity. Ben Pierce: Ota Benga opens with a free public reception from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday, March 9, at Hoffman LaChance Contemporary (2713 Sutton Boulevard, Maplewood; The show remains up through March 31. free admission

Hoffman LaChance Contemporary (map)
2713 Sutton Blvd.
phone 314-960-5322
Ben Pierce: Ota Benga

As Blue Is to Distance

Saturdays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through March 24

As Blue Is to Distance, the new exhibition at Monaco (2701 Cherokee Street;, is a joint venture of individual expression by Rachael Starbuck and Meghan Grubb. In Grubb's case, the show is a chance to make a leap forward. "My work in the show is very new; it's about tension between body and space," she explains. "Spaces that disorient you or unhook you, make you reconsider your physical distance to something. I want it to unhook you from unthinkingly moving through day-to-day life." The drive to make you reacquaint yourself with your own body shows up in Grubb's installations, many of which are inspired by the motion and color of water. In the mobile-like Water Cuts, the gray, blue and white of the sea is suspended from a wall in asymmetrical shapes and oblongs, shocking in their unnatural stillness. A streak of silver separates the duller colors, imitating the play of light on moving water. It's wrongly static, a memory of a beach-side trip that never changes, the past made false by being present — but that's the intention. The show opens with a free reception from 7 to 10 p.m. Friday, March 2. On Saturday, March 3, both women will discuss the show with curator Stephanie Weissberg at 4 p.m. free admission

Postwar Prints and Multiples: Investigating the Collection

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through April 16

Like many collecting institutions, the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum (1 Brookings Drive; houses more art than it can easily display. As part of its continuing mission to bring stored pieces out for the public to enjoy, the Kemper presents its new exhibition, Postwar Prints and Multiples: Investigating the Collection. The exhibit draws on the wealth of printed artwork by a range of artists who rose to prominence during the twentieth century from a host of artistic movements. Among the artists represented by key works are Ellsworth Kelly, Claes Oldenburg, Man Ray, Meret Oppenheim, Roy Lichtenstein and La Monte Young. Postwar Prints and Multiples opens with a free reception from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, February 2, at the museum. The show remains on display through April 16, and admission is free. free admission

Trenton Doyle Hancock: The Re-Evolving Door to the Moundverse

Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays, Thursdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through April 22

Drawing inspiration from the morality tales of cartoons (a cat is always bad, but birds or mice are good; dogs also are heroes), comic books (equally flamboyant bad guys and good guys), video games and films, Trenton Doyle Hancock created his own private universe, one in which the Mounds (half-plant, half-animal, all-good living forest) and the Vegans (they eat Mounds!) endlessly battle it out for supremacy. Both Coonbear and Bringback, a henchman in a striped unitard, are part of the battle, because they're also some part of Hancock. Politics, race, class, identity and issues of social justice are hidden in these stories, just like Sun Ra's own fully scored space operas in the jazz world. Trenton Doyle Hancock: The Re-Evolving Door to the Moundverse is a collection of these drawings, sculptures and prints that show part of the eternal struggle of good and evil, right and wrong, moral and immoral. The Re-Evolving Door to the Moundverse opens with a free reception at 7 p.m. Friday, January 19, at Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; Hancock will discuss the Moundverse and his work at 11 a.m. Saturday, January 20. The show continues through April 22, and the gallery is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday, and 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Admission is free. free admission


Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m., Sundays, 2 & 7 p.m., Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 7 p.m. and Saturdays, 4 & 8 p.m. Continues through March 24

Chinese artist Lin Bo made headlines with his audacious virtual protest on the anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre, and the wave of publicity surrounding him hasn't crested yet. The artist will appear in St. Louis to address his work, conditions for dissident artists in China and activism as the guest of the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis this month. His address includes examples of the work that riled China's ruling powers, which will be on display for the duration of his stay. Lin Bo is also a character in Christopher Chen's play Caught, which asks pointed questions about art collectors' love of a sob story, the politics of supporting dissidents as an investment, and the slippery nature of looking for objective truth in the subjective media of art and theater. Caught is performed Tuesday through Sunday (March 7 to 25) at the Loretto-Hilton Center (130 Edgar Road; Tickets are $45 to $69.50. $45-$69.50


Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Sept. 24

Albert Ostermaier's drama Infected centers on a lone day trader. He's under quarantine, and his mental health is swiftly deteriorating under his protracted isolation — or maybe it's his mysterious malady that's eating away at his brain? Whichever it is, he's definitely slipping free of reality; he's begun to think he caught his virus from the stock market itself, as he explains in a frantic monologue about his life, his work and his disease. Upstream Theater presents the American premiere of Infected, translated by Philip Boehm from Ostermaier's original German. Performances take place at 8 p.m. Thursday to Saturday and 7 p.m. Sunday (February 9 to 24), with an additional 2 p.m. show on Sunday, February 25, at the Kranzberg Arts Center (501 North Grand Boulevard; Tickets are $25 to $35. $25-$35

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Kranzberg Arts Center (map)
501 N Grand Blvd
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-0367
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