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Craft Alliance Faculty Show

Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Tuesdays-Thursdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Continues through Aug. 13

The faculty of the Craft Alliance Center of Art + Design (6640 Delmar Boulevard, University City; www.craftalliance.org) are artists as well as teachers. Once every two years they gather to show their work where they work at the Craft Alliance Faculty Show. More than 40 artists participate, including Maxine du Maine, Shweta Sarraf and Jeff Hornung. This year's exhibit opens with a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Craft Alliance Center of Art + Design (6640 Delmar Boulevard, University City; www.craftalliance.org). The show remains up through August 13, and the gallery is open every day except Monday. free admission

On Golden Pond

Sundays, 2 p.m. Continues through July 23

Norman and Ethel Thayer are looking forward to another tranquil summer spent on the lake, but their adult daughter Chelsea has other ideas. She plans to bring her new boyfriend Bill along to celebrate her dad's birthday, but what she doesn't announce is that Bill's teenage son Billy Ray will be tagging along. Norman and Chelsea have had a rocky relationship over the years, but the visit is mostly pain-free — at least until Chelsea asks if Norma and Ethel can take care of Billy Ray for the rest of the summer while she and Bill head to Europe. Ernest Thompson's On Golden Pond captures a family in transition: Ethel and Norman are approaching the end of their lives, while Chelsea is simultaneously stuck in her unhappy past and eager to face the future. Insight Theatre Company presents On Golden Pond at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and at 2 p.m. Sunday (July 6 to 23) at .Zack (3224 Locust Street; www.insighttheatrecompany.com). Tickets are $20 to $35. $20-$35

.Zack (map)
3224 Locust St
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-304-3602
On Golden Pond

The Hats of Stephen Jones

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3
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You may not recognize Stephen Jones by name, but you've most likely seen his work. The English milliner's creations have been worn by trend-setting celebrities for more than 30 years, from Princess Diana to Lady Gaga. A selection of eight of his avant-garde hats are displayed at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org) in Hats of Stephen Jones, a complementary exhibition to the ongoing exhibition Degas, Impressionism, and the Paris Millinery Trade. Jones' exhibit will remain up from Friday, April 21 to Sunday, September 3. At 2 p.m. Sunday, April 23, Jones visits the museum to discuss his work and his inspirations with New York milliner Jennifer Ouellette. Admission to the lecture is $20 to $25; exhibition admission is $6 to $15. $6-$15

In the Realm of Trees

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3

Classical Chinese artists often used trees as inspirations or the focus of their works. Trees and the natural world are the focus of the new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), In the Realm of Trees, which includes photographs, paintings and decorative works that glorify the beauty found in nature. The centerpiece of the show is a set of contemporary photographs called Sacred Tree on Mount Lu, made by Beijing-based photographer Michael Cherney, which was acquired for the museum's permanent collection in 2016 and will be presented for the first time in this exhibit. In the Realm of Trees opens on Friday, March 10, and remains up through Sunday, September 3, in gallery 225. The gallery is open Tuesday through Sunday, and admission is free. free admission

Learning to See: Renaissance and Baroque Masterworks

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through July 30

Phoebe Dent Weil created the field of sculpture conservation in the early 1970s right here in St. Louis. As you might imagine, her personal collection of art is deep and full of treasures. Her husband Mark Weil was an art historian, and his collection is also heavy with the hits of the Baroque and Renaissance. They have promised their joint art holding to the Saint Louis Art Museum, where the public will be able to enjoy for years to come the fruits of their very fruitful collecting years. Learning to See: Renaissance Baroque Masterworks from the Phoebe Dent Weil and Mark S. Weil Collection features etchings by Rembrandt van Rijn and Albrecht Dürer and sixteenth-century Italian terracotta sculptures and busts, each work a miracle of craftsmanship and artistic vision. free admission

New Media Series: Amy Granat

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Nov. 12

In the nineteenth century the American Dream was tied up in Manifest Destiny. We would spread across the continent from the East to the West on foot, by wagon or train. Once the West was won, the dream changed and became nice home, a fast car and an open road. But what is the American Dream today, when we cover the land from to sea to sea and all frontiers are gone? Amy Granat's Cars, Trees, Houses, Beaches is a silent 16mm film loop of Hawaiian beaches, muscle cars and modernist homes, among them Kirkwood's own Russell and Ruth Goetz Krauss house, which was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The film ruminates on these conquered frontiers, many of which are once again the stuff of dreams for Americans. The Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org) presents Granat's film as part of its long-running New Media Series. It shows on an endless loop from July 14 to November 12 in gallery 301. Admission is free, and the museum is open every day except Monday. free admission

Tennessee Williams: The Playwright and the Painter

Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through July 23

In addition to his work as a playwright, Tennessee Williams painted. The subject of his expressionist paintings varies; often he painted close friends, but some of his creations reference scenes from his plays, or reveal his personal feelings. David Wolkowsky, a close friend of Williams, has graciously loaned seventeen paintings from his personal collection to the Saint Louis University Museum of Art as part of this year's Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis. This is only the second time they’ve been exhibited outside of Key West, so fans should take advantage of this rare viewing. The show is supplemented by an audio recording of Williams reading his poetry and a short video of Wolkowsky discussing his friend. free admission

Urban Wanderers: Through Their Eyes

Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through July 23
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Stray Rescue's street teams see animals in their worst moments. Chained up in their own filth, injured and holed up behind dumpsters, malnourished and abused — these animals are found in abominable conditions, and Stray Rescue's people know it. This year's Urban Wanderers art show is all about that moment when the cats and dogs are pulled out of the darkness and back into the world. More than 80 artists have read the individual stories of a cat or dog's rescue; the artists have then interpreted in their work the animal's emotional state at the moment Stray Rescue arrived. Actual artifacts found with the rescuee have been incorporated into the exhibit as well. Urban Wanderers: Through Their Eyes opens with a free reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, June 9, at the Saint Louis University Museum of Art (3663 Lindell Boulevard; sluma.slu.edu). The show remains up through July 23, and the gallery is open 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. free admission

Emily Oliver: Weaving as Ritual and Art

Sundays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3

Emily Oliver's work in Weaving as Ritual and Art is deceptively sparse. Her widely spaced color bars and shapes only look that way because you're thinking like a painter; all the white space in her weaving requires as much work as the colored bits, after all. Oliver's new exhibition Weaving as Ritual and Art alludes to early Modernist painters through her use of negative space and isolated color, but her work also hews to the pattern-making that comprises traditional textile arts. The exhibition opens with a free reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, July 7, at the Dark Room (3610 Grandel Square; www.thedarkroomstl.com). The show remains up through September 3. free admission

The Dark Room (map)
3610 Grandel Square
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-776-9550
Emily Oliver: Weaving as Ritual and Art

Urban Planning: Art and the City 1967-2017

Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 13

Agnes Denes' photograph Wheatfield -- A Confrontation: Battery Park Landfill, Downtown Manhattan is one of the more incongruous images you're likely to see. The artist stands holding a staff in a hip-deep golden field of wheat; rising up from the other side of the street is a battalion of skyscrapers. You don't think of Manhattan as agriculturally active, but wheat grew wild near the landfill in 1982. The image is part of the Contemporary's summer exhibition, Urban Planning: Art and the City 1967-2017, which takes a contemplative approach to documenting the ebb and flow of city life. Urban Planning comprises photographs, sculptures and installations that address gentrification, white flight and the decay that follows -- and the occasional rebirth of a city. free admission

9 to 5 The Musical

Tuesdays-Fridays, 8 p.m., Saturdays, 4 & 8 p.m., Sun., July 23, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun., July 30, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun., Aug. 6, 2 p.m., Sun., Aug. 13, 2 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 20, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Continues through Aug. 20

Violet is the sort of hard-working employee most bosses would love to have. Unfortunately she works directly under Franklin Hart, a chauvinist who is never going to appreciate her skills or promote her. Newly divorced Judy has rejoined the workforce after a lengthy gap. She learns that the technology has outpaced her, even with excellent mentoring from colleague Violet. And then there's Doralee, Hart's busty personal secretary and, according to him, devoted love slave. These three working gals quickly realize that many of their problems would be solved if the boss was out of the way — and so they hatch a scheme to get him out of the picture. The 1980 film 9 to 5 was a surprise hit thanks to its fizzy feminist approach and wish fulfillment plot. Original star Dolly Parton adapted it into a musical with screenwriter Patricia Resnick (she co-wrote the film); Parton handles the music and lyrics, and Resnick the book. Stages St. Louis continues its season with 9 to 5 The Musical. Performances take place Tuesday through Sunday (July 21 to August 20) at the Robert G. Reim Theatre (111 South Geyer Road, Kirkwood; www.stagesstlouis.org). Tickets are $47 to $63. $47-$63

Robert G. Reim Theatre (map)
111 S. Geyer Road
Kirkwood
phone 314-821-2407
9 to 5 The Musical

LaBute New Theater Festival

Sundays, 3 p.m. and Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through July 30

Now in its fifth year, St. Louis Actors' Studio's LaBute New Theater Festival is a guaranteed good time for fans of new and exciting plays. The eponymous Neil LaBute contributes "Hate Crime," which will open every performance. Among the five other finalists are two St. Louisans, Carter Lewis and Tearrance Chisholm. Lewis should be familiar to Repertory Theatre of St. Louis audiences, as the company has mounted four of his plays in the past, including the incendiary Evie's Waltz. Chisholm rocked Washington, D.C., early this year with his play Hooded, or Being Black for Dummies, a sharp bit of meta-theater with a laugh track and a wary eye for the dangers of growing up black in America. The 2017 LaBute New Theater Festival takes place at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and at 3 p.m. Sunday (July 7 to 30) at the Gaslight Theater (358 North Boyle Avenue; www.stlas.org). Tickets are $30 to $35. $30-$35

Birthday Bash Exhibition

Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 31
phone 314-402-1959
greendoorartgallery@aol.com

Green Door art gallery presents “Birthday Bash" Reception Friday, July 7, 2017 from 5-9 pm featuring Alicia Farris’ watercolor paintings, fiber art by Annie Scheumbauer, Mark Hurd’s brightly colored urban scenes, paintings by Vesna Delevska and jewelry by Julie Bell, Ellen Klamon and Pam Bohling, plus artwork by 30 other artists-Artwork available from July 5 until August 31, 2017. Located at 21 N. Gore, Webster Groves MO 63119 near St. Louis 314-402-1959 www.GreenDoorartgallery.com/events free

http://www.greendoorartgallery.com
Green Door Art Gallery (map)
21 N. Gore Ave.
Webster Groves
phone 314-402-1959
Birthday Bash Exhibition

On Golden Pond

Sundays, 2 p.m. Continues through July 23

On Golden Pond had its Broadway appearance in 1979. Directed by Ernest Thompson and reopened again the following season. It received a Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play and received 5 Drama Desk Awards: Outstanding New Play; Outstanding Actor in a Play; Outstanding Actress in a play. When it was adapted for the screen in 1981, it starred Henry Fonda, Katherine Hepburn and Jane Fonda, and was highly acclaimed. It is a love story of Ethel and Norman Thayer, a long married couple in their near 80s and their relationship with their daughter, Chelsea. $35 General Admission $30 Seniors 65+ $20 Students with ID

http://insighttheatrecompany.com/shows/on-golden-pond-2017/
Buy Tickets
.Zack (map)
3224 Locust St
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-304-3602
On Golden Pond

9 to 5 The Musical

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m., Saturdays, 4 p.m., Sundays, 7:30 p.m., Sundays, 2 p.m., Thursdays, 2 p.m., Wednesdays, 2 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 20, 7:30 p.m. Continues through Aug. 20
phone 314-821-2407
marketing@StagesStLouis.org

Based on the 1980 hit movie, this hilarious musical romp explores friendship and revenge in the Rolodex era. Chock-full of upbeat and optimistic songs by country superstar Dolly Parton, three female coworkers concoct a plan to live out their wildest fantasies by giving their sexist, lying, hypocritical bigot of a boss the boot! In the process, the women give their workplace a dream makeover and take control of the company that had always kept them down. You will laugh, cry, and ultimately cheer the exploits of Violet, Judy, and Doralee as they discover the joys of working 9 to 5! $25-$60

http://www.stagesstlouis.org/Shows/9-to-5-The-Musical/
Buy Tickets
Robert G. Reim Theatre (map)
111 S. Geyer Road
Kirkwood
phone 314-821-2407
9 to 5 The Musical
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