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Craft Alliance Faculty Show

Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Tuesdays-Thursdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Continues through Aug. 13

The faculty of the Craft Alliance Center of Art + Design (6640 Delmar Boulevard, University City; www.craftalliance.org) are artists as well as teachers. Once every two years they gather to show their work where they work at the Craft Alliance Faculty Show. More than 40 artists participate, including Maxine du Maine, Shweta Sarraf and Jeff Hornung. This year's exhibit opens with a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Craft Alliance Center of Art + Design (6640 Delmar Boulevard, University City; www.craftalliance.org). The show remains up through August 13, and the gallery is open every day except Monday. free admission

Helene Slavin: Paracosm

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 5

Helene Slavin's abstract paintings are actually fractals — infinite patterns that repeat themselves at different scales — which she creates by throwing paint and then using an electric toothbrush to fine-tune the patterns that form. There's an organic quality to her work that becomes more apparent the longer you look at it, which makes sense; fractals appear everywhere in the natural world, from ferns to mountains. But Slavin's fractals all exist in the created world of her paintings. Hence the title of her new exhibit, Paracosm — a paracosm being a highly detailed imaginary world. This show of worlds within worlds is a fundraiser benefiting Just Moms STL and the Earth Defense Coalition. Helene Slavin: Paracosm opens with a free reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Thursday, July 6, at the Philip Slein Gallery (4735 McPherson Avenue; 314-361-2617). Paracosm remains up through August 5. free admission

Philip Slein Gallery (map)
4735 McPherson Ave.
St. Louis - Central West End
phone 314-361-2617
Helene Slavin: Paracosm

Imagery of Chess: St. Louis Artists

Wednesdays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sundays, 12-5 p.m. and Mondays, Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 17

In 1944 Marcel Duchamp, Julien Levy and Max Ernst organized The Imagery of Chess, an exhibition of chess sets reimagined by artists and performers. Their hope was that people's vision of the chess board and pieces would be expanded beyond the then-accepted options of either the classic Staunton design or the "French" set. In 2016, the World Chess Hall of Fame exhibited some of the works from the 1944 show to acknowledge the debt owed to those artists for forever altering the look of chess. Imagery of Chess: St. Louis Artists is the new follow-up exhibit, which invites twenty local artists to have their way with the game pieces. Among those participating are Eugenia Alexander, who cites the Afrofuturism movement as a key influence on her work; fashion designer and Project Runway vet Michael Drummond; and Yuka Suga, a glass and metals artist who also works as a therapist. A second, simultaneous show, Pow! Capturing Superheroes, Chess & Comics, showcases more than 200 chess-themed comic books (you'd be surprised by how many super villains play chess to keep their minds sharp for optimal intricate scheming functionality). There are also superhero-themed chess boards and a comic book reading room. Both exhibitions open a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, March 23, at the World Chess Hall of Fame (4652 Maryland Avenue; www.worldchesshof.org). Imagery of Chess continues through September 14. Pow! remains up through September 17. Admission is a suggested $5 donation. $5 suggested donation

The Hats of Stephen Jones

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3
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You may not recognize Stephen Jones by name, but you've most likely seen his work. The English milliner's creations have been worn by trend-setting celebrities for more than 30 years, from Princess Diana to Lady Gaga. A selection of eight of his avant-garde hats are displayed at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org) in Hats of Stephen Jones, a complementary exhibition to the ongoing exhibition Degas, Impressionism, and the Paris Millinery Trade. Jones' exhibit will remain up from Friday, April 21 to Sunday, September 3. At 2 p.m. Sunday, April 23, Jones visits the museum to discuss his work and his inspirations with New York milliner Jennifer Ouellette. Admission to the lecture is $20 to $25; exhibition admission is $6 to $15. $6-$15

Learning to See: Renaissance and Baroque Masterworks

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through July 30

Phoebe Dent Weil created the field of sculpture conservation in the early 1970s right here in St. Louis. As you might imagine, her personal collection of art is deep and full of treasures. Her husband Mark Weil was an art historian, and his collection is also heavy with the hits of the Baroque and Renaissance. They have promised their joint art holding to the Saint Louis Art Museum, where the public will be able to enjoy for years to come the fruits of their very fruitful collecting years. Learning to See: Renaissance Baroque Masterworks from the Phoebe Dent Weil and Mark S. Weil Collection features etchings by Rembrandt van Rijn and Albrecht Dürer and sixteenth-century Italian terracotta sculptures and busts, each work a miracle of craftsmanship and artistic vision. free admission

New Media Series: Amy Granat

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Nov. 12

In the nineteenth century the American Dream was tied up in Manifest Destiny. We would spread across the continent from the East to the West on foot, by wagon or train. Once the West was won, the dream changed and became nice home, a fast car and an open road. But what is the American Dream today, when we cover the land from to sea to sea and all frontiers are gone? Amy Granat's Cars, Trees, Houses, Beaches is a silent 16mm film loop of Hawaiian beaches, muscle cars and modernist homes, among them Kirkwood's own Russell and Ruth Goetz Krauss house, which was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The film ruminates on these conquered frontiers, many of which are once again the stuff of dreams for Americans. The Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org) presents Granat's film as part of its long-running New Media Series. It shows on an endless loop from July 14 to November 12 in gallery 301. Admission is free, and the museum is open every day except Monday. free admission

Jennifer Colten: Higher Ground

Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m., Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and Tuesdays, 12-8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 26

Back in the old days, the insanities of racism and segregation kept black people and white people out of the same graveyards. Washington Park Cemetery was for many years the largest final resting place for black St. Louis. Its proximity to Lambert St. Louis International Airport doomed it, however. Highway 70 ran through the middle of the cemetery in the 1950s, and more bodies were moved in the '90s when MetroLink tracks were laid and the airport expanded. Photographer Jennifer Colten documented the current state of the cemetery for the new multimedia exhibition Higher Ground: Honoring Washington Park Cemetery, Its People and Place. Her large-scale, color photographs are supported by historical documentation, video and oral histories (by Denise Ward-Brown) and an art installation by Dail Chambers, all toward the goal of illuminating the racial politics and tangled history behind a black cemetery’s sacrifice in the name of progress. free admission

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The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900
Jennifer Colten:  Higher Ground

Through Darkness to Light: Photographs Along the Underground Railroad

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 11

Photographer Jeanine Michna-Bales wanted to document the Underground Railroad, the circuitous trail that stretched more than 1,400 miles from Louisiana to Canada. Perhaps 100,000 black men and women followed that course to freedom in the early part of the nineteenth century to escape slavery. Rather than photograph the safe houses and hiding places in natural daylight, Michna-Bales sought to recreate the trail as the hopeful people who made the crossing would have seen it: in the dead of night, with no human beings in sight. Her photographs capture the stillness and solitude of the American wilderness. A river crossing takes place in almost total darkness, the trees on the other bank nigh invisible in the night. In some of Michna-Bales' images, traces of light from the setting sun give the trees rising up out of the bayou the menacing shape of people. It took Michna-Bales ten years to research and photograph the passage, but it was time well spent. The resulting exhibition, Through Darkness to Light: Photographs Along the Underground Railroad, is an emotional as well as visual record of a harrowing journey. Michna-Bales discusses her photographs at 5:30 p.m. Friday, June 23, at the Griot Museum of Black History (2505 St. Louis Avenue; www.thegriotmuseum.com). Her images will remain on display through Friday, August 11, and the museum is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday. An accompanying monograph, which pairs the images with passages written both by people who made the journey and noted abolitionists, will be available for purchase during the show. Admission is $3.75 to $7.50. $3.50-$7.50

Emily Oliver: Weaving as Ritual and Art

Sundays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3

Emily Oliver's work in Weaving as Ritual and Art is deceptively sparse. Her widely spaced color bars and shapes only look that way because you're thinking like a painter; all the white space in her weaving requires as much work as the colored bits, after all. Oliver's new exhibition Weaving as Ritual and Art alludes to early Modernist painters through her use of negative space and isolated color, but her work also hews to the pattern-making that comprises traditional textile arts. The exhibition opens with a free reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, July 7, at the Dark Room (3610 Grandel Square; www.thedarkroomstl.com). The show remains up through September 3. free admission

The Dark Room (map)
3610 Grandel Square
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-776-9550
Emily Oliver: Weaving as Ritual and Art

Urban Planning: Art and the City 1967-2017

Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 13

Agnes Denes' photograph Wheatfield -- A Confrontation: Battery Park Landfill, Downtown Manhattan is one of the more incongruous images you're likely to see. The artist stands holding a staff in a hip-deep golden field of wheat; rising up from the other side of the street is a battalion of skyscrapers. You don't think of Manhattan as agriculturally active, but wheat grew wild near the landfill in 1982. The image is part of the Contemporary's summer exhibition, Urban Planning: Art and the City 1967-2017, which takes a contemplative approach to documenting the ebb and flow of city life. Urban Planning comprises photographs, sculptures and installations that address gentrification, white flight and the decay that follows -- and the occasional rebirth of a city. free admission

9 to 5 The Musical

Tuesdays-Fridays, 8 p.m., Saturdays, 4 & 8 p.m., Sun., July 30, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun., Aug. 6, 2 p.m., Sun., Aug. 13, 2 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 20, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Continues through Aug. 20

Violet is the sort of hard-working employee most bosses would love to have. Unfortunately she works directly under Franklin Hart, a chauvinist who is never going to appreciate her skills or promote her. Newly divorced Judy has rejoined the workforce after a lengthy gap. She learns that the technology has outpaced her, even with excellent mentoring from colleague Violet. And then there's Doralee, Hart's busty personal secretary and, according to him, devoted love slave. These three working gals quickly realize that many of their problems would be solved if the boss was out of the way — and so they hatch a scheme to get him out of the picture. The 1980 film 9 to 5 was a surprise hit thanks to its fizzy feminist approach and wish fulfillment plot. Original star Dolly Parton adapted it into a musical with screenwriter Patricia Resnick (she co-wrote the film); Parton handles the music and lyrics, and Resnick the book. Stages St. Louis continues its season with 9 to 5 The Musical. Performances take place Tuesday through Sunday (July 21 to August 20) at the Robert G. Reim Theatre (111 South Geyer Road, Kirkwood; www.stagesstlouis.org). Tickets are $47 to $63. $47-$63

Robert G. Reim Theatre (map)
111 S. Geyer Road
Kirkwood
phone 314-821-2407
9 to 5 The Musical

LaBute New Theater Festival

Sundays, 3 p.m. and Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through July 30

Now in its fifth year, St. Louis Actors' Studio's LaBute New Theater Festival is a guaranteed good time for fans of new and exciting plays. The eponymous Neil LaBute contributes "Hate Crime," which will open every performance. Among the five other finalists are two St. Louisans, Carter Lewis and Tearrance Chisholm. Lewis should be familiar to Repertory Theatre of St. Louis audiences, as the company has mounted four of his plays in the past, including the incendiary Evie's Waltz. Chisholm rocked Washington, D.C., early this year with his play Hooded, or Being Black for Dummies, a sharp bit of meta-theater with a laugh track and a wary eye for the dangers of growing up black in America. The 2017 LaBute New Theater Festival takes place at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and at 3 p.m. Sunday (July 7 to 30) at the Gaslight Theater (358 North Boyle Avenue; www.stlas.org). Tickets are $30 to $35. $30-$35

Diego and Frida: A Smile in the Middle of the Way

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 4

Diego Rivera became a legend in his native Mexico for his vibrant murals. Perhaps unfortunately for him, his enshrinement happened early in his life; it's difficult to be a man and a legend at the same time. Frida Kahlo chose to become a painter only after a serious car crash derailed her dream of being a doctor. Her self-portraits are revered for their depiction of the feminine experience, and they are informed both by her continuing physical pain and the emotional turmoil of her marriage to Rivera, whom she eventually divorced and then remarried. They made a vicarious, creative and combative couple, and were often photographed together and separately by friends and family. Diego and Frida: A Smile in the Middle of the Way, the new exhibit at the International Photography Hall of Fame and Museum (3415 Olive Boulevard; www.iphf.org), showcases a large collection of formal and informal photographs of the pair. Included in the exhibit are pictures captured by Guillermo Kahlo (Frida's father), Ansel Adams, muralist Lucienne Bloch, who photographed much of Rivera and Kahlo's work, and prolific Mexican photographer Agustin Victor Casasola. Diego and Frida is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday (Saturday, May 13, to Friday, August 4). Admission is $3 to $5. $5

Reigning Men: Fashion in Menswear 1715-2015

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through Sept. 17
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It was the poet-philosopher Billy Gibbons who first posited that "every girl is crazy 'bout a sharp-dressed man," and yet on the whole, American men have settled for athletic team logos and cargo shorts. But there's more to life than five-pocket shorts and t-shirts. Reigning Men: Fashion in Menswear 1715-2015, the new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), celebrates the beauty and style that's available to men. The show traces development of the suit from its origins as a military uniform through the heavily embroidered great coats of the nineteenth century, with a detour into the effectiveness of the black leather jacket before finishing up with modern sartorial splendors. Reigning Men is open Tuesday through Saturday (June 25 to September 17), and admission is $6 to $15, but the show is free on Friday. $6-$15, free on Friday

Little Shop Of Horrors

Thu., July 27, 7-9 p.m., Fri., July 28, 7-9 p.m., Sat., July 29, 7-9 p.m. and Sun., July 30, 2-4 p.m.
phone 618-698-6661
KimberlyLorrene@gmail.com

Join us on Skid Row with the Ignite Cast of Little Shop of Horrors Rated: PG13 The meek floral assistant Seymour Krelborn discovers a new breed of plant he names "Audrey II" - after his coworker crush. This foul-mouthed, R&B-singing carnivore promises unending fame and fortune to the down and out Krelborn as long as he keeps feeding it, BLOOD. Over time, Seymour discovers Audrey II's intergalactic origins and evil intent to global domination! A delicious Broadway and Hollywood sci-fi musical, Little Shop Of Horrors has devoured the hearts of theatre goers for over 30 years. $17.00

https://www.facebook.com/events/1469938033049582/
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