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Lupin III: The Castle of Cagliostro

Tue., Sept. 19, 7 p.m.
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Hayao Miyazaki's first film as a director was the fast-paced heist film Lupin III: The Castle of Cagliostro. Titular antihero and natural goofball Arsene Lupin III comes from a long line of thieves; when his latest crime nets him nothing but counterfeit dollars, he decides to find the forger. The search leads him to the small country of Cagliostro, where a forbidding castle hides a beautiful woman and a conspiracy stretching back years. The Castle of Cagliostro has fantastic action, beautiful animation and a delightfully loopy hero — and now it finally gets released in American theaters. Fathom Events presents two screenings of the film, with bonus footage and commentary from legendary animator John Lasseter, at 7 p.m. Thursday and Tuesday (September 14 and 19) at the Marcus Wehrenberg Ronnies 20 Cine (5320 South Lindbergh Boulevard; www.fathomevents.com). The dubbed version of the film is shown on Thursday and the subtitled version on Tuesday. Tickets are $7.50 to $12. $7.50-$12

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Margaret Atwood

Tue., Sept. 19, 7 p.m.
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The TV adaptation of The Handmaid's Tale has raised writer Margaret Atwood's profile in the public consciousness, but for those in the know, Atwood was already a singular artist. She has written novels, poetry, criticism, short fiction, children's books and libretti. Throughout her writing she advocates for women's rights, animal rights, a better relationship with nature and a more humanistic approach to the world and each other. She's prickly about how her work is classified by others, and about how her homeland — Canada — is viewed by Americans. She's a true original; brilliant, thoughtful and a gifted stylist. Tonight at 7 p.m. Margaret Atwood receives the 2017 St. Louis Literary Award at the Sheldon (3648 Washington Boulevard). Admission is free, but registration is required. Visit www.thesheldon.org for details. free admission, but registration is required

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The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900
Margaret Atwood

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through Oct. 1

Christopher Boone is discovered next to the corpse of his neighbor's dog and is immediately accused of killing her beloved hound. Christopher professes his innocence, but nobody — neither the dog's owner, Mrs. Shears, nor his father — appears to take what he's telling them into account. Of course, Christopher has trouble understanding emotions and personal interaction; he's a bright young man, especially for a fifteen-year-old, but he just doesn't process people that well. So Christopher sets out to find the real dog-killer, which requires him to comprehend motivation and the many ways people fudge the truth. He's also going to have to go to London, a place that overwhelms him even when he's chaperoned by a responsible adult. This time, he'll go it alone. Simon Stephens won the 2015 Tony Award for his modern mystery The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, which is based on the novel by Mark Haddon. The Repertory Theatre St. Louis opens its new season with this unusual coming-of-age story. Performances take place Tuesday through Sunday (September 8 to October 1) at the Loretto-Hilton Center on Webster University's campus (130 Edgar Road; www.repstl.org). Tickets are $18.50 to $89. $18.50-$89

South Pacific

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through Oct. 8

If you want to end a season on a high note, it's difficult to beat Rodgers & Hammerstein's >South Pacific. The perennially popular musical has everything: sweeping romance, a pointed lesson about learned prejudice, the loss of innocence and the horrors of war. And we haven't even mentioned the songs yet, which include "There's Nothing Like a Dame" and "Some Enchanted Evening." Stages St. Louis goes brings down the curtain on its 2017 season with the incomparable South Pacific. Performances take place Tuesday through Sunday (September 8 to October 8) at the Robert G. Reim Theatre at the Kirkwood Community Center (111 South Geyer Road, Kirkwood; www.stagesstlouis.org). Tickets are $47 to $63. $47-$63

Robert G. Reim Theatre (map)
111 S. Geyer Road
Kirkwood
phone 314-821-2407
South Pacific

A Century of Japanese Prints

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 28, 2018

Japan had a long history of woodblock printing (ukiyo-e) that, although now recognized for their artistic qualities, were at the time purely commercial works. That began to change in the mid-nineteenth century, as Japanese artists were exposed to Western printmaking. These early modern artists began the creative print movement, which was motivated by a desire to explore the artistic possibilities of Japan's traditional hand-carved woodblock printing methods. Artists such as Kobayakawa Kiyoshi and Hashiguchi Goyō created portraits of modern Japanese society in prints that are both beautiful works of art and incredible documents of an era. The Saint Louis Art Museum displays a treasure trove of them in the new exhibit, A Century of Japanese Prints. The show opens on Friday, August 11, and remains up through January 28. Admission is free. free admission

New Media Series: Amy Granat

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Nov. 12

In the nineteenth century the American Dream was tied up in Manifest Destiny. We would spread across the continent from the East to the West on foot, by wagon or train. Once the West was won, the dream changed and became nice home, a fast car and an open road. But what is the American Dream today, when we cover the land from to sea to sea and all frontiers are gone? Amy Granat's Cars, Trees, Houses, Beaches is a silent 16mm film loop of Hawaiian beaches, muscle cars and modernist homes, among them Kirkwood's own Russell and Ruth Goetz Krauss house, which was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The film ruminates on these conquered frontiers, many of which are once again the stuff of dreams for Americans. The Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org) presents Granat's film as part of its long-running New Media Series. It shows on an endless loop from July 14 to November 12 in gallery 301. Admission is free, and the museum is open every day except Monday. free admission

Howard Jones: Think Rethink

Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Oct. 22

Like many artists, Howard Jones is deeply enamored of his tools. These are the objects that channel the creative vision, after all. But Jones engages with tools beyond merely working with them. He views them as material and media, taking them apart, modifying them and reshaping them into art objects. In Jones' hands a shovel handle sprouts three blades; the handle of a paint brush sprouts a violin neck or an assemblage of pencils; and the legs of a chair curl out in rake heads. His exhibition Howard Jones: Think Rethink features a host of tools that offer an elegant beauty — and sometimes function as well. Think: Rethink opens with a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, August 25, at the Craft Alliance Center of Art + Design (6640 Delmar Boulevard, University City; www.craftalliance.org). The show remains up through October 22, and the gallery is open every day except Monday. free admission

Exposure 19: Jumbled Time

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 2

Gallery 210's long-running Exposure series brings together local artists who work in the same media or pursue the same ideas in their work. In the case of Exposure 19: Jumbled Time, Stan Chisholm, Lizzy Martinez and Adam Turl all share an interest in narrative art, whether that's the sometimes enigmatic phrases Chisholm stamps out on bricks and other building materials, or Turl's set-like assemblages of objects and paint that hint at the personality of their subject. Jumbled Time opens with a free artists' reception from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, August 26, at Gallery 210 on the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus (1 University Drive at Natural Bridge Road; 314-516-5976). The show remains up through December 2, and the gallery is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. free admission

University of Missouri-St. Louis-Gallery 210 (map)
1 University Dr at Natural Bridge Road
North St. Louis County
phone 314-516-5976
Exposure 19: Jumbled Time

The Golden Hour

Mondays-Fridays, 7 a.m.-5 p.m., Saturdays, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 21, 5-7 p.m. Continues through Oct. 27

Art Saint Louis challenged artists to capture the golden hour — that magic time at dawn and dusk when sunlight gives the world a luminous beauty — in the medium of their choice for the gallery's new show. The works selected for the juried exhibit run the gamut. Lorraine Cange photographed a Jewel Box lily pond in black and white, focusing on the pattern of shadows formed on the lily pads. Russell Vanecek captured the glory of a Flad Avenue alley bisected by a bright box of brilliant sunlight. Bob Rickert's abstract photograph of the Palouse hills in Washington State is a model of contrasts, with stark shadows giving way to glowing hilltops. The Golden Hour is at Art Saint Louis (1223 Pine Street; www.artsaintlouis.org). The show continues through October 27, and the gallery is open 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. There will be a rescheduled closing reception from 5-7 p.m. Saturday, October 21. free admission

Art Saint Louis (map)
1223 Pine St
St. Louis - Downtown
phone 314-241-4810
The Golden Hour

Kader Attia: Reason's Oxymorons

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 8, 2018

Human beings' adaptability is what allows people to gradually come to terms with catastrophic change and trauma. In the Western world, we consider it possible for someone who has experienced a tragedy to "heal," thereby erasing a wrong. But the non-Western world doesn't always believe that disaster can be plastered over. In some countries, the scars and imperfections are celebrated. These conflicting ideas of past damage are the inspiration for French-Algerian artist Kader Attia's exhibition Reason's Oxymorons. Attia interviewed and filmed historians, storytellers, philosophers and ethnographers from around the world discussing their cultural ideas of healing psychic damage. These films are then continuously played on an array of televisions placed throughout a maze of gray cubicles. The viewer can pass from cube to cube, gaining exposure to previously foreign worldviews. Kader Attia: Reason's Oxymorons opens with a free public reception from 7 to 9 p.m. tonight at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum on the Washington University campus (1 Brookings Drive; www.kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu). The show remains up through January 8, and the museum is open every day except Tuesday. free admission

Mickalene Thomas: Mentors, Muses and Celebrities

Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through Dec. 31

New York-based artist Mickalene Thomas pursues the perception of black women in the spotlight in her new exhibit, >Mentors, Muses and Celebrities. Known mostly for her rhinestone, acrylic and enamel paintings, here Thomas explores how gender and beauty are represented in modern society through film and video installations. Her twelve-minute, two-channel video projection Do I Look Like a Lady? features images of Eartha Kitt, Moms Mabley and Whitney Houston, all of them black women who attained a level of power and fame. Thomas draws equal inspiration from the three women at the heart of the film adaptation of The Color Purple, as played by Oprah Winfrey, Whoopi Goldberg and Margaret Avery. The juxtaposition of three characters who had little to no power in their lives being portrayed by three exceptionally powerful women is the essence of Thomas' work. Who decides which women are beautiful? What is the source of their power? Who controls the image? Mickalene Thomas: Mentors, Muses and Celebrities opens with a free public reception at 7 p.m. tonight at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org). The show remains up through December 31, and the museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. free admission

Dot

Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., Sundays, 3 p.m. and Wednesdays, Thursdays, 7 p.m. Continues through Sept. 24

Dotty is not who she once was — and some days, even she can admit that. Gone is the middle-class woman who raised three kids and used to entertain all and sundry during the holidays. In her place is a woman who forgets to take her pills and can't safely prepare her own meals or be trusted alone in her own home. Her daughter Shelly has taken charge of Dotty's care, but Shelly has her own life to get back to. What does Dotty have left? Colman Domingo's play Dot deals with aging, Alzheimer's and the unsettling passing of the baton that happens when children step up to care for their own parents. The Black Rep opens its 41st season with Dot. Performances take place at 7 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday (September 6 to 24) at Washington University's Edison Theatre (6465 Forsyth Boulevard; www.theblackrep.org). Tickets are $15 to $45. $15-$45

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Edison Theatre (map)
6445 Forsyth Blvd.
Clayton
phone 314-935-6543
Dot

#1 in Civil Rights

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through April 15, 2018

St. Louis' history as a wellspring of civil rights activism is deep and impressive. Dred and Harriet Scott's legal fight to be free, Mary Meachum's bold actions leading slaves to freedom across the Mississippi River, the Jefferson Bank protesters organizing to get access to better jobs, Percy Green and the daring VP Ball invaders who challenged St. Louis' powerful elite and the exclusionary nature of their private party — all of these people fought the good fight in St. Louis. #1 in Civil Rights, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; www.mohistory.org) chronicles the history of the civil rights movement in the metro area through artifacts, historical photos, oral histories, art work and actors' performances. Every key moment in the black struggle for equality is covered up to the present day, with artifacts collected by the museum staff following the killing of Michael Brown and the resulting civil unrest in Ferguson playing a major role in the exhibit. #1 in Civil Rights opens on Saturday, March 11, and continues through April 15, 2018. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
#1 in Civil Rights

LA Painting: Formalism to Street Art

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Oct. 7

The Los Angeles art scene doesn't get as much attention as New York's does (they're just not cool enough), but the West Coast scene is thriving. LA Painting: Formalism to Street Art, the new exhibition at Bruno David Gallery (7513 Forsyth Boulevard; www.brunodavidgallery.com), features contemporary work by 24 artists working in a broad range of styles. Some artists capture the unique LA sunlight, some work in Abstract Expressionism, others are more concerned with the narrative use of the figure or the uniquely Southern Californian school of Abstraction, Hard-Edge Geometry. LA Painting: Formalism to Street Art opens with a free reception 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday, September 2, and remains up through October 7. The gallery is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday. free admission

Bruno David Gallery (map)
7513 Forsyth Blvd.
Clayton
phone 314-696-2377
LA Painting: Formalism to Street Art

Unsuspecting Susan

Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Sept. 30

Susan is a 50-something divorcee who lives in England's Hampshire countryside. She leads a very proper and normal life, participating in the local theater and gossiping with and about her neighbors. Everything in her life is fine, except that her son lives in London (she doesn't like to go to the city if she can help it) and he's still unmarried. But suddenly, everything in her life isn't fine. The police raid her house, looking for clues that could explain how her son became the lead suspect in a suicide bombing that took place in London. Stewart Permutt's one-woman show Unsuspecting Susan charts a woman trying to figure out what went wrong, and when. The Inevitable Theatre Company presents Unsuspecting Susan at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday (September 15 to 30) at the Chapel (6238 Alexander Drive; www.inevitabletheatre.org). Tickets are $15 to $25. $15-$25

The Chapel (map)
6238 Alexander Drive
Clayton Unsuspecting Susan
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