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The Jazz Edge Orchestra

Every fourth Sunday, 6-8:30 p.m.
phone 314-966-2739
deblaze@gmail.com

Recognized as a dynamic, driving and versatile ensemble, TJEO delivers original charts combined with exciting contemporary R&B, soul and blues. Under the direction of Thomas Moore, its unmatched menu of rhythmic renditions yields great creativity and depth. TJEO has performed with giants Clark Terry, Lester Bowie, James Moody, Frank Foster, Oliver Nelson, Jr., Keyon Harrold, Russell Gunn, Denise Thimes, Frank Wess, Chuck Berry, Geri Allen, The Cunninghams, Wallace Roney and plenty more at venues like Powell Symphony Hall, The St. Louis Arch, and St. Louis Science Center. $10 cover

http://www.kirkwoodstationbrewing.com
Kirkwood Station Brewing Company (map)
105 E. Jefferson Ave
Kirkwood
phone 314-966-2739
The Jazz Edge Orchestra

Charis: War & Peace

Fri., Dec. 15, 8 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 16, 8 p.m.
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Charis, St. Louis' women's chorus, marks its 25th anniversary this year, and of course the ladies are celebrating with a concert. War & Peace features songs about the nature of charity and compassion, the necessary elements for a just society. The program includes Elizabeth Alexander's prescient anthem for change, "Fighting Over What We Believe" ("I see us fighting over what we believe, how to love and how to pray. We begin with hope and resolve and dreams, and end up fighting over what we believe"), as well some lighter songs about the domestic battles that all partners wage on the homefront. Charis: War & Peace is performed at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday (December 15 and 16) at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; www.charischorus.org). Tickets are $13 to $20. $13-$20

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
Charis: War & Peace

Remnant

Sundays, 2 p.m. and Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Dec. 23

Theater companies often present Christmas-themed plays during December, but you rarely see one as alien and yet familiar as Ron Reed's drama Remnant. The play takes place after the end of the world, in the cramped home of Barlow Sho'r and family, who live surrounded by the electric detritus of the pre-apocalypse world. Despite the cataclysm that has broken society, memories of Christmas still linger for the survivors — and Barlow fervently believes that if they properly perform all the Christmas rituals tonight, the world will spontaneously rejuvenate. When a mysterious stranger arrives seeking shelter, Barlow has a tough decision to make. Does Christmas require him to kill a man to make its miracle work? Mustard Seed Theatre made its debut with Remnant way back in 2007. It mounts its second production of the show — one even closer to the end of the world — at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and at 2 p.m. Sunday (December 7 to 23) at Fontbonne Fine Arts Theatre (6800 Wydown Boulevard; www.mustardseedtheatre.com). Tickets are $15 to $35. $15-$35

Fontbonne University Fine Arts Theatre (map)
6800 Wydown Blvd.
Clayton
phone 314-862-3456
Remnant

Currents 114: Matt Saunders

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Feb. 4, 2018

American artist Matt Saunders is interested in the way an image can be altered with the passage of time. He pursues that interest through photography and animation, with a particular emphasis on avoiding cameras. Instead he captures light that has passed through oil paintings on linen, or through printed-on plastic, to create the shadows of images; his photograms are almost dark reflections of the intervening material. Saunders has created all-new work for Currents 114: Matt Saunders, his new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Among these new works are large-scale copper-plate etchings and a video installation that plays across multiple screens in two galleries. The mutable images of Matt Saunders are on display Tuesday through Sunday (November 17 to February 4) in gallery 249 and 250. Admission is free. free admission

Living Proof: The Art of Japanese Draftsmanship in the 19th Century

Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through March 3, 2018

As strange as it seems to us in the West, Japanese artists in the nineteenth century did not view their own drawings as individual works of art. They were "thinking on paper" or creating visual aids for wood carvers and printers who would create the actual work of art: the woodblock print. But despite their creators' misgivings about the artistry, drawings by master woodblock printers such as Utagawa Kuniyoshi and Katsushika Hokusai are indeed works of art. Living Proof: The Art of Japanese Draftsmanship in the 19th Century, the new exhibition at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation (3716 Washington Boulevard; www.pulitzerarts.org), collects more than 80 such "throwaway" drawings that capture the artists' work in their own hands, with corrections and alterations that demonstrate how they thought about and edited their projects "in camera." Living Proof is on display November 3 through March 3. free admission

Pulitzer Arts Foundation (map)
3716 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-754-1850
Living Proof: The Art of Japanese Draftsmanship in the 19th Century

St. Charles Christmas Traditions

Saturdays, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Sundays, 12-5 p.m. and Wednesdays, Fridays, 6-9 p.m. Continues through Dec. 24
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With Thanksgiving officially out of the way, we progress on to (sigh) Christmas (look, I don't make the rules). If you're a fan, there's only one place you should be: St. Charles Christmas Traditions. Historic downtown St. Charles harkens back to an earlier generation's Christmas, with chestnut roasters, carolers and costumed Santas from around the world wandering its brick streets. Following the opening ceremony at 11 a.m. Friday, November 24, at Frontier Park (First Capitol Drive and South Riverside Drive; www.stcharleschristmas.com), the Santas partake in a parade with their seasonal friends (the parade is repeated at 1:30 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday 'til Christmas). The Cobblestone Wassailers sing after the parade, followed by the Land of Sweets dance party. You can get in a little shopping or just soak up the atmosphere. St. Charles Christmas Traditions continues from 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesday and Friday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday through December 24. Those Wednesday nights are also Krampusnachts, when Krampus, the Mouse King and Belsnickel make their appearances — bring your naughty kids and it'll straighten 'em up quickly, before it's too late. Admission is free. free admission

Steve McCurry: The Importance of Elsewhere

Tuesdays-Saturdays. Continues through Feb. 3, 2018

Photographer Steve McCurry created an iconic image with his portrait of a young Afghani girl and her haunting, bottomless eyes, which stared down his lens and seemingly into the innermost chamber of your heart. But that photograph isn't the extent of McCurry's work. For almost 40 years he has been traveling the world, photographing people in India, the temples of Angkor Wat, burning oil fields in Kuwait, and indeed, even an entire series on the striking eyes he spots in people's faces the world over. Steve McCurry: The Importance of Elsewhere, the new exhibition of his work at the Sheldon (3648 Washington Boulevard; www.thesheldon.org), features 37 photographs made by McCurry during his journey. The exhibit opens with a free reception from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, October 6. The show continues through February 3, 2018, and the gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday. Admission is free. free admission

Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900
Steve McCurry: The Importance of Elsewhere

U.S. Bank Wild Lights

Wednesdays-Sundays, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Through Dec. 23, 5-8:30 p.m. and Through Dec. 30, 5-8:30 p.m. Continues through Dec. 17

Last year readers of USA Today determined that the Saint Louis Zoo (1 Government Drive; www.stlzoo.org) had the third-best holiday light display in the country. Buoyed by that ranking, the zoo is determined this year to come out on top — so expect to be dazzled by U.S. Bank Wild Lights. This year's light installation is open from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday (November 24 to December 17) and then goes nightly from December 18 to 23 and December 26 to 30. There will be carolers and costumed characters, fireside storytellers and children's craft projects in the Woodland Workshop. Penguin & Puffin Coast, Sea Lion Sound and the Monsanto Insectarium are all open during the evening event, as is the gift shop. Admission is $7 to $10. $7-$10

Saint Louis Zoo (map)
1 Government Dr
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-781-0900
U.S. Bank Wild Lights

Global Moves: Americans in Chess Olympiads

Mondays, Tuesdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sundays, 12-5 p.m. and Wednesdays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through April 1, 2018

The Chess Olympiad is a biennial competition in which national teams compete for the title. America is the current holder, triumphing against 180 other nations to achieve the victory. It was our first win since 1976, and so the World Chess Hall of Fame takes this golden opportunity to honor the reigning champions. The exhibition Global Moves: Americans in Chess Olympiads is a celebration of America's current and past glories, with numerous historic chess artifacts being displayed — among them, a gold medal from the 2016 team. Grandmasters Fabiano Caruana, Hikaru Nakamura, Wesley So, Ray Robson and Sam Shankland, who all played for the 2016 American team, will attend the opening reception, which takes place from 6 to 8 p.m. tonight at the World Chess Hall of Fame (4652 Maryland Avenue; www.worldchesshof.org). Also on display is the Hamilton-Russell Cup, the trophy granted to the Olympiad's winning team. Global Moves continues through April 1. $3-$5 suggested donation

Theo Welling: Portraits

Sundays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11-1 a.m. Continues through Dec. 31

For the past couple years, Theo Welling has had a weekly gig photographing and interviewing St. Louisans for the Riverfront Times (there's that full disclosure). Every week the paper publishes the photo, and accompanying commentary from his subjects, as "The Lede." Welling has spoken with short-order cooks, kids, acrobats, artists, yoga practitioners — pretty much anybody who is willing to share something about their life. As documents, they're interesting, but as a barometer of what St. Louis worries about, believes, celebrates and condemns, they're fascinating. Welling's best shots are familiar and startling, reminding us that for all the ways we're different, we're also recognizably the same. Theo Welling: Portraits, an exhibition of his favorite images, opens with a free public reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, November 3, at the Dark Room (3610 Grandel Square; www.thedarkroomstl.com). The show remains up through December 31. free admission

The Dark Room (map)
3610 Grandel Square
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-776-9550
Theo Welling: Portraits

Kader Attia: Reason's Oxymorons

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 8, 2018

Human beings' adaptability is what allows people to gradually come to terms with catastrophic change and trauma. In the Western world, we consider it possible for someone who has experienced a tragedy to "heal," thereby erasing a wrong. But the non-Western world doesn't always believe that disaster can be plastered over. In some countries, the scars and imperfections are celebrated. These conflicting ideas of past damage are the inspiration for French-Algerian artist Kader Attia's exhibition Reason's Oxymorons. Attia interviewed and filmed historians, storytellers, philosophers and ethnographers from around the world discussing their cultural ideas of healing psychic damage. These films are then continuously played on an array of televisions placed throughout a maze of gray cubicles. The viewer can pass from cube to cube, gaining exposure to previously foreign worldviews. Kader Attia: Reason's Oxymorons opens with a free public reception from 7 to 9 p.m. tonight at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum on the Washington University campus (1 Brookings Drive; www.kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu). The show remains up through January 8, and the museum is open every day except Tuesday. free admission

Mickalene Thomas: Mentors, Muses and Celebrities

Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through Dec. 31

New York-based artist Mickalene Thomas pursues the perception of black women in the spotlight in her new exhibit, >Mentors, Muses and Celebrities. Known mostly for her rhinestone, acrylic and enamel paintings, here Thomas explores how gender and beauty are represented in modern society through film and video installations. Her twelve-minute, two-channel video projection Do I Look Like a Lady? features images of Eartha Kitt, Moms Mabley and Whitney Houston, all of them black women who attained a level of power and fame. Thomas draws equal inspiration from the three women at the heart of the film adaptation of The Color Purple, as played by Oprah Winfrey, Whoopi Goldberg and Margaret Avery. The juxtaposition of three characters who had little to no power in their lives being portrayed by three exceptionally powerful women is the essence of Thomas' work. Who decides which women are beautiful? What is the source of their power? Who controls the image? Mickalene Thomas: Mentors, Muses and Celebrities opens with a free public reception at 7 p.m. tonight at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org). The show remains up through December 31, and the museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. free admission

The Flick

Sundays, 6:30 p.m. and Fridays, Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. Continues through Dec. 23

Annie Baker's Pulitzer Prize-winning drama The Flick is an atypical play. There is no action to speak of, and much of what occurs is limited to three ushers mopping the floor of a rundown movie theater. In between bouts of mopping, the trio discuss the job and films, and reveal tiny bits of themselves through nothing but naturalistic dialogue. If you enjoyed the playwright's Circle Mirror Transformation, which Repertory Theatre St. Louis produced a few years back, you'll likely find The Flick similarly enchanting. R-S Theatrics closes out its season with The Flick at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 6:30 p.m. Sunday (December 8 to 23) at the Kranzberg Arts Center (501 North Grand Boulevard; www.r-stheatrics.com). Tickets are $18 to $20. $18-$20

Buy Tickets
Kranzberg Arts Center (map)
501 N Grand Blvd
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-0367
The Flick

The Nutcracker

Wednesdays, Fridays, 7:30 p.m., Thursdays, Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Sundays, 2:30 p.m. Continues through Dec. 23
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The Saint Louis Ballet's annual performance of The Nutcracker is a grand ballet in the old sense. More than 100 dancers (both professionals and children) perform during the holiday favorite, with lavish costumes, extravagant sets and almost 500 cheese cubes (the Mouse King's pay) filling the stage. The story, and that wonderful Tchaikovsky score, remains the centerpiece. Young Clara falls asleep at a Christmas party and slips into a dreamworld in which toys come to life and her new nutcracker becomes a handsome soldier who gallantly defends her against the Mouse King. The Saint Louis Ballet performs The Nutcracker at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and Friday, 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. Thursday and Saturday and 2:30 p.m. Sunday (December 15 to 23) at the University of Missouri-St. Louis' Touhill Performing Arts Center (1 University Drive at Natural Bridge Road; www.stlouisballet.org). Tickets are $25 to $69. $25-$69

Buy Tickets
Blanche M Touhill Performing Arts Center (map)
1 University Dr at Natural Bridge Road
North St. Louis County
phone 314-516-4949
The Nutcracker

A Behanding in Spokane

Sundays, 3 p.m. and Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Dec. 17

Carmichael is approaching the closure he's been pursuing for the past 27 years. He's in a cruddy hotel room, waiting for his meeting with Toby and Marilyn, who say they can help him. All Carmichael needs is a hand out — specifically his left hand, which was severed from his arm more than a quarter-century ago. He's been pursuing his wayward appendage all the while, and now he's close: Toby and Marilyn claim to have Carmichael's hand, and they'll sell it back to him for the right price. But can a man fixated on what he doesn't have and two people who've sunk so low they're selling necrotic body parts in dumpy hotels successfully close any deal? Martin McDonagh's black comedy A Behanding in Spokane puts you in the room for the dead-end deal of the century. St. Louis Actors' Studio continues its season with A Behanding in Spokane. Performances take place at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and at 3 p.m. Sunday (December 1 to 17) at the Gaslight Theater (358 North Boyle Avenue; www.stlas.org). Tickets are $30 to $35. $30-$35

Showing 1-15 of 172 total results in this search.

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