Events This Weekend in St. Louis

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Printing the Pastoral: Visions of the Countryside in 18th-Century Europe

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 1


The consumers of middle- and upper-class society in the eighteenth century developed a passion for rural scenes of traditional country life, just as the introduction of copperplate printing to the textile industry made it possible to produce fabrics with intricately detailed scenes printed upon them. Textile factories began churning out yards of fabric with shepherds, village fêtes and strolling couples for a market that could afford to buy them as furniture coverings, bedding and curtains. Printing the Pastoral: Visions of the Countryside in 18th-Century Europe, an exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum, includes numerous examples of the craft, several of which have never before been shown at the museum. The centerpiece of the exhibit is a reconstructed bed with printed bedding and curtains. Printing the Pastoral continues through December 1 in gallery 100 at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Admission is free. 314-721-0072

Dutch Paintings in the Age of Rembrandt

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 12


The Netherlands gained independence from Spain during the brutal and grueling 80 Years War, which was followed by the Dutch Golden Age. Its ports, wind power and sailing prowess kindled a financial engine that powered the new country into the forefront of banking and trade; and with that windfall of money came the rise of the Dutch school of portrait painters. Rembrandt van Rijn, Frans Hals and Aeltje Uylenburgh all created masterpieces in this period of prosperity. Dutch Paintings in the Age of Rembrandt, the new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), showcases 70 paintings on loan from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, that demonstrate the Dutch mastery of portraiture, landscape and genre painting (paintings depicting stories with a moral). The exhibit opens Sunday, October 20, and remains on display through January 12. Tickets are $6 to $15 (but free on Friday), and the museum is open every day except Monday and major holidays. 314-721-0072

Sam Falls: Conception

Through Dec. 22, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.


Sam Falls' artworks are inspired by, and at least in part created by, nature. For his exhibition at Laumeier Sculpture Park, Falls laid a canvas covered with dry pigments on ground in the park's woodland. Left there for several days, the dew, whatever rain fell and the sunlight that passed through the leaves overhead and onto the canvas made a record of the local flora. In addition to his large-scale nature paintings, Falls has also mosaicked a pair of steel I-beams with tiles featuring native plants grown especially by Laumeier's master gardener at Falls' request. The finished beams are placed standing upright in the forest, reflecting and refracting the natural landscape that surrounds them. Sam Falls: Conception opens with a free public reception from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, August 24, at the Aronson Fine Arts Center in Laumeier Sculpture Park (12580 Rott Road, Sunset Hills; www.laumeier.org). Falls' work remains on display through December 22. 314-615-5278

The Lifespan of a Fact

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through Nov. 10
Loretto-Hilton Center 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves Webster Groves


John D'Agata is a literary essayist whose latest piece is a magazine article — more of a classicist's rumination, perhaps — on the Las Vegas suicide of a teenager. The problem is his fact-checker, Jim Fingal, who insists on precision of language and detail. D'Agata's not interested in details; he's trying to convey the sweep of symbolism inherent in the death of a young man in Sin City. Through emails and eventually in person, both men wage what is increasingly a very personal war over language, intention and fact. Can facts be molded to better get at D'Agata's meaning? Is the truth of anything in fact quantifiable — and can it be done on a very tight deadline? Jeremy Kareken, David Murrell and Gordon Farrell's comic play The Lifespan of a Fact is about the struggle to get the truth in print, a feat made more difficult by that peculiar habit of men, taking all criticism as an attack. The Repertory Theatre St. Louis presents The Lifespan of a Fact Tuesday through Sunday (October 18 to November 10) at the Loretto-Hilton Center (130 Edgar Road; www.repstl.org). Tickets are $20 to $94.50.

The Shape Of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through March 22


The Thelma and Bert Ollie Memorial Collection of abstract art officially went on display Tuesday, September 17, at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). The collection was gifted to the museum in 2017 by New Jersey-based art collector Ronald Maurice Ollie and his wife, Monique McRipley Ollie, in honor of Ronald's parents. The elder Ollies often visited the Saint Louis Art Museum with their children, instilling a lifelong passion for art. Ronald and Monique Ollie together collected art for many years, particularly work by contemporary black artists. Among the treasures in the exhibit, The Shape Of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection, are important works such as Robert Blackburn's lithograph Faux Pas, Mary Lovelace O'Neal's City Lights and Frank Bowling's Fishes, Wishes and Star Apple Blue, which demonstrates Bowling's innovative painting technique. In all, 40 works are displayed in the show, which draws its title from a poem by Quincy Troupe. The St. Louis native was inspired by the artworks in the Ollie Collection and wrote "The Shape of Abstraction; for Ron Ollie" in response. Troupe's poem is included in the exhibit catalog. 314-721-0072

Pulitzer Prize Photographs and In Focus: St. Louis Post-Dispatch Photographs

Through Jan. 20, 2020
Missouri History Museum 5700 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis St. Louis - Forest Park

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Photographs are a key element of narrative storytelling, which is why it's so baffling that newspapers have deemed staff photographers an expendable luxury. You probably recognize many of the photographs that won Pulitzer Prizes, from Joe Rosenthal's shot Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, to Alan Diaz's memorable photo of U.S. federal agents seizing Elian Gonzalez, to St. Louis Post-Dispatch photographer Robert Cohen's 2014 image of a protestor throwing a tear-gas canister back at police while protesting the killing of Michael Brown. These photographs shock us, inspire feelings of pride and anger, and inform us, just as great written journalism does. The Newseum in Washington created a traveling exhibit of some of the most beautiful images to win the Pulitzer, and it's a show that will make its St. Louis debut on Saturday, August 3, at the Missouri History Museum (5700 Lindell Boulevard; www.mohistory.org). A second exhibition organized by the Missouri History Museum collected 75 photos of everyday life in St. Louis from the Post-Dispatch archives. Pulitzer Prize Photographs and In Focus: St. Louis Post-Dispatch Photographs remain on display through January 20, and admission is free. Parents are cautioned that some of the photographs are intense and may be too much for younger children. 314-746-4599

Carlos Zamora: cART

Through Dec. 22


Art is something to be appreciated, and St. Louis-based illustrator/graphic designer Carlos Zamora's cART exhibition at Laumeier Sculpture Park is one of those examples. Zamora transformed three golf carts into kinetic sculptures by installing his oversized paper boat sculptures on top and wrapping the bodies with printed vinyl slogans. A fourth large paper boat sculpture will be placed in a creek on the Laumeier grounds. The Cuban native drew inspiration for the project from his heritage, specifically the song "Baraquio de papel" — "Little Paper Boat" — as well as Cuban car culture, nursery rhymes and politics.

Carlos Zamora: cART opens with a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, July 25, at Laumeier Sculpture Park (12580 Rott Road; www.laumeier.org). The following night a Havana Night celebration takes place in the park's Aronson Fine Arts Center from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., with mojitos, snacks, "Casino" dance lessons and a screenprinted poster station. Tickets are $25, but admission to the park and Zamora's boat sculptures is free. The exhibition continues through December 22, and the park is open daily from 8 a.m. to 30 minutes past sunset.

314-615-5278

Howard Barry: Inertia

Tuesdays-Saturdays. Continues through Dec. 9
University of Missouri-St. Louis-Gallery 210 1 University Dr at Natural Bridge Road, Normandy North St. Louis County


Local artist Howard Barry has gained significant attention for his illustrations inspired by the Ferguson protests, but he's not just an activist artist. Barry's drawings are a form of physical therapy and mental therapy. He creates to relieve his frustration with the world and his own pain. Using ink, coffee and various computer programs for effects, Barry creates images of artists, musicians, civil rights pioneers and modern-day protesters, all with an eye for gesture and a gift for imbuing something of his subject's character. James Baldwin's luminous eyes reveal his hurt and anger with the country that rejected him for his blackness and homosexuality, while a barefoot child pushing his way through cotton emerges from a page of sheet music for Billie Holiday's "God Bless the Child." Inertia, an exhibition of Barry's artwork, opens with a free reception from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday, September 14, at Gallery 210 on the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus (1 University Drive at Natural Bridge Road; www. gallery210.umsl.edu). The show remains on display through December 9. 314-516-5976

Cayce Zavaglia: Unseen

Tuesdays-Saturdays. Continues through Nov. 27
William Shearburn Gallery 665 S Skinker Blvd, Clayton Clayton


Cayce Zavaglia's artworks appear to be hyper-realistic painted portraits when viewed from a distance; it's only when you move closer that you realize that they're embroidered. Zavaglia eventually noticed that the backside of each work contained a second portrait, one whose knotted and blurred features were just as beautiful and perhaps more psychologically interesting than the front. Recently she's returned to her roots as a painter by recreating these "hidden faces" in painted portraits. Unseen, a solo exhibition of Zavaglia's work in both paint and embroidery, goes on display at the William Shearburn Gallery (665 South Skinker Boulevard; www.shearburngallery.com) on Friday, October 18. The show opens with a free reception from 5 to 7 p.m. Unseen remains on display through November 27. 314-367-8020

Dear Evan Hansen

Sundays, 1 p.m., Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Tuesdays-Fridays, 7:30 p.m. Continues through Nov. 3
The Fox Theatre 527 N. Grand Blvd., St. Louis St. Louis - Grand Center

Buy Tickets$45-$105


Benj Pasek and Justin Paul's musical Dear Evan Hansen caused a national stir on Broadway, thanks to its ultra-contemporary plot. Evan Hansen is a high schooler with social anxiety being raised by his working mom, who's rarely at home. When a pep-talk letter he wrote to himself ends up in the pocket of a fellow student who commits suicide, Evan becomes involved with the grieving family. This gets him closer to Zoe, his longtime crush who's also the younger sister of the deceased. A white lie he tells to comfort the boy's parents spins out of control but also brings him closer to Zoe. Of course, Evan also is throwing out more lies all the time to keep his story afloat, and he's doomed to come back to the truth eventually. The Fox Theatre (527 North Grand Boulevard; www.fabulousfox.com) presents Dear Evan Hansen at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday (October 22 to November 3). Tickets are $45 to $150. 314-534-1111

Ai Weiwei: Bare Life

Sundays, 12-5 p.m. and Mondays, Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 5


The Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum (1 Brookings Drive; kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu) officially reopens with a bang. Chinese artist and dissident Ai Weiwei presents a major exhibition of work that spans the past twenty years of his career, some of which has never before been shown in the United States. Divided into two parts, Bare Life and Rupture, the show features monumental exhibitions such as Forever Bicycles (2019) and Through (2007-2008). The former is a commemorative arch built with Chinese-made bicycles, their carefully positioned tires lining up to create the image of telescoping lenses; the latter is an intersecting series of wooden pillars that pierce the surface of Qing Dynasty wooden tables. The work evokes China's own interrupted and intentionally erased history. Ai Weiwei: Bare Life also includes sculptures, photographs, films and a triptych constructed of LEGO bricks. The show runs from September 28 to January 5. 314-935-4523

Foundations of Freedom

Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through Jan. 31
Field House Museum 634 S. Broadway, St. Louis St. Louis - Downtown

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Dred Scott was a slave who'd been taken from Missouri, a slave state, to Illinois, a free one. Yet he remained in bondage. In 1846 Scott sued for freedom from enslavement for himself and his wife Harriet, arguing that his two years of residing in a free state should make him a citizen under the doctrine of "once free, always free." The case was fought in various courts from 1846 to 1857, with victories and setbacks along the way. After the Scotts' patron could no longer pay their legal fees, St. Louis attorney Roswell Field took the case pro bono and continued the fight to win the Scotts' freedom. It was an unpopular cause in Missouri, but the Scotts' eventual defeat helped further stiffen the spine of the abolitionist cause. Roswell Field's home is now the Field House Museum, which opens its new exhibition, Foundations of Freedom, in honor of Black History Month. The exhibit tells the story of the Scotts' long legal struggle, other freedom suits and the national conversation about the legality of slavery in the nineteenth century. Foundations of Freedom opens Saturday, February 2, at the Field House Museum (634 South Broadway; www.eugenefieldhouse.org). It remains on display through January 31, 2020, and the museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. Admission is $5 to $10. 314-421-4689

Soft Scrub

Fridays, Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Wednesdays, Thursdays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Oct. 26
The Luminary 2701 Cherokee St, St. Louis St. Louis - South City


The everyday black household is foreign territory to most of America. There have been a few TV shows (The Jeffersons at the richer end of the spectrum, Good Times at the more financially tenuous) that depicted fictionalized domestic situations, but even those can be considered non-standard families. They certainly weren't entirely relatable to Katherine Simóne Reynolds' own upbringing. Inspired by this dearth of representation, Reynolds asked black male artists to address the idea of black home life from a male perspective. The exhibition Soft Scrub challenges stereotypes and reveals lessons learned about cleanliness, division of labor and social expectations. Soft Scrub opens with a free reception from 7 to 10 p.m. Friday, September 13, at the Luminary (2701 Cherokee Street; www.theluminaryarts.com). Participating artists include Vaughn Davis Jr., Mitchell Squire, Cameron Granger and Keyon Gaskin. The exhibit remains up through October 26. 314-773-1533

Stephanie Syjuco: Rogue States

Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 29

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Artist Stephanie Syjuco was born in Manila and immigrated to the United States with her family when she was three years old, which gave her an American education and an immigrant's eye for our national blindspots. It's these blindspots that inform the art in her exhibition Stephanie Syjuco: Rogue States, which opens with a free reception at 7 p.m. Friday, September 6, at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org). The title of the show comes from her installation of 22 flags that were used to represent the flags of made-up nations in various American films. Also in the exhibit is her large-scale installation Neutral Calibration Studies (Ornament + Crime), which comprises artifacts representing both colonizer and colonized societies. Cultural objects such as wicker chairs and traditional rugs Syjuco purchased online, cardboard cutouts of people and actual artifacts are mixed together in a larger-than-life diorama. Nestled in the background is a color photograph of the "stone-age" tribe of the Tasaday, found on a remote island in the Philippines in the early 1970s, who were actually modern people posed by a photographer. Rogue States continues through December 29, and the museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. 314-535-4660

Brighton Beach Memoirs

Thursdays, 7:30 p.m., Saturdays, 4 & 8 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m. Continues through Oct. 27


All Eugene Jerome wants to do is eat ice cream and see a naked woman, preferably at the same time. At the moment, all he has to do is go get another quarter pound of butter from the store every morning and afternoon because of his mother's strange shopping habits and keep the noise down (there's a cake in the oven). The Depression is dragging on in 1937, and his aunt and her two daughters — one of them the beautiful Nora, who's close to Eugene's age — have moved in out of necessity. Eugene's dad is working two jobs to support everyone, his older brother faces a moral dilemma at his own job, and poor Eugene gets buffeted about by the whims of his mother and the various intra-family squabbles. Neil Simon's semi-autobiographical play Brighton Beach Memoirs is a trip back to the simpler days, when a family could drive each other crazy and no one tweeted about it. The New Jewish Theatre opens its new season with Brighton Beach Memoirs. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, 4 and 8 p.m. Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday (October 10 to 27) in the Wool Studio Theatre at the Jewish Community Center (2 Millstone Campus Drive; www.newjewishtheatre.org). Tickets are $47 to $54. 314-442-3283

The Who's Tommy

Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Oct. 26
Tower Grove Abbey 2336 Tennessee Ave., St. Louis St. Louis - South Grand


Eight years ago, Stray Dog Theatre unleashed its glorious production of The Who's Tommy. It was a knock out. Associate artistic director Justin Been took the lead on staging the production, revealing his prodigious talents for arranging actors in ever-shifting tableaux. The result was a beautifully kinetic production that made pinball an exuberant celebration of life. At long last, Stray Dog will once again present Tommy in all his deaf, dumb and blind glory, with Been overseeing the production. The show is performed with a live band, as it should be, at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday (October 10 to 26) at the Tower Grove Abbey (2336 Tennessee Avenue; www.straydogtheatre.org). Tickets are $25 to $30. 314-865-1995

Rocky Horror Picture Show

Fridays, Saturdays, 11:55 p.m. Continues through Oct. 26
Landmark Tivoli Theatre 6350 Delmar Blvd., University City Delmar/ The Loop


Would Halloween even happen if The Rocky Horror Picture Show didn't screen in the Delmar Loop? Richard O'Brien's immortal love story tells the tale of decent American couple Brad and Janet (a couple of squares) who break down on the road and seek help at the castle of Dr. Frank-N-Furter on the same night he's about to bring his greatest, most virile creation to life. There's very little horror (unless you're terrified by alternative lifestyles) but a whole lot of singing about hotness and being brave enough to live out your dreams. Oh, and not to be too spoilery about a 40-plus-year-old movie, but Meatloaf fans: His name is taken very literally here. The Rocky Horror Picture Show is shown at 11:55 p.m. Friday and Saturday (October 18 to 26) at the Landmark Tivoli Theatre (6350 Delmar Boulevard, University City; www.landmarktheatres.com) as part of the Reel Late series. The Samurai Electricians return to perform the essential role of "shadow cast," which recreates the movie while it screens. Tickets are $11. 314-727-7271

Decoys & Depictions: Images of the Digital

Fri., Oct. 25, 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 26, 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m.

Buy TicketsFree


@ Washington University—Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts, One Wrighton Way
A symposium exploring how digital images are constructed; the implications for how architects and artists operate; and the potential effects within social and political realms. 314-935-6200

Mary Louise Edwards

Fri., Oct. 25, 2-8 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 26, 2-8 p.m.
St. Clair Square Highway 64 & N. Illinois St., Fairview Heights Belleville/ Fairview Heights


Mary Louise Edwards will be having her first book signing event October 25-27 books are 10.00 including a signing and photo if like. Friday and Saturday are from 2-4 and 6-8 and Sunday from 3-5 St Clair Square Mall Mary currently writes under Mary Louise Thole. Her book Uncontrolled Desires is available online. This book is for young adults and older. It’s very sensitive and controversial but very true as to what’s going on in our society. 618-632-7566

Halloween Movie Night

Fri., Oct. 25, 6:30-10 p.m.

Buy Tickets$10


Nine Network and St. Louis Public Radio, in partnership with Johnnie Brock’s Dungeon Party Warehouse, presents 1993's camp classic, Hocus Pocus, outdoors in the Public Media Commons. Don't miss the story of three outlandishly wild witches (Bette Midler, Sarah Jessica Parker and Kathy Najimy) return from 17th-century Salem after they're accidentally conjured up by some unsuspecting pranksters! The premovie hijinks include a costume contest and an Oh So Vivant photo booth. (Please, no costumes with weapons, drug paraphernalia, etc.) A light meal and specialty cocktail are included in ticket price. A cash bar will be available. Register at nineNet.org/events 314-512-9664

Under the Same Tree Trivia Night

Fri., Oct. 25, 6:30-10 p.m.

Buy Tickets$25 each


@ The Heights Community Center, 8001 Dale Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63117
Join us at The Heights Community Center on October 25 for a night of fun and friendly competition in support of building family stability around the world! Doors open at 6:30 pm with trivia starting promptly at 7 pm. Tickets are $25, or a table of 8 for $180. Admission includes popcorn and soft drinks, but feel free to bring your own snacks and drinks of any kind. Look forward to great prizes, raffle, and silent auction! This event supports the work of Under the Same Tree, a non-profit organization that prevents the effects of poverty. 314-397-0221

Spirits in the Dark

Fri., Oct. 25, 6:30-10 p.m.

Buy Tickets$35.00


@ Hearth Room at the Hawken House, 1155 S. Rock Hill Rd. Webster Groves , MO 63119
Spirits in the Dark: An Evening of Spooky Cocktails and Unknown Spirits with the St. Louis Bourbon Society. What is it about being in the dark that scares you the most? Is it not knowing what's about to happen or is it the reality that you have to rely on your sense of smell, taste and sound to survive? Join the St. Louis Bourbon Society this Halloween season for a Blind Bourbon tasting with Bourbon and Banter that will have you facing your fears about being in the dark! 3147998746

Cedar Lake Cellars' Halloween Party in the Barrel Tomb

Fri., Oct. 25, 7-10 p.m.
Cedar Lake Cellars 11008 Schreckengast Road, Wright City Outstate MO


Cedar Lake Cellars hosts a Halloween party in The Barrel Tomb. The evening featurea DJ Rob Cutler in the winery’s Barrel Room, plus prizes for the evening’s best Halloween costumes, as well as dance contest winners. 636-745-9500

A Day to Remember

Fri., Oct. 25, 7 p.m.
Family Arena 2002 Arena Parkway, St Charles St. Charles County

Buy Tickets$39.50-$59.50


w/ I Prevail, Beartooth 636-896-4200

The Matchsellers present Bluegrastronauts

Fri., Oct. 25, 7-10 p.m.
Pop's Blue Moon 5249 Pattison Ave., St. Louis St. Louis - Tower Grove


As featured on NPR’s Mountain Stage Radio Show, The Matchsellers’ Bluegrastronauts is the world’s first outer-space bluegrass odyssey. Mixing elements of tall tales, theater, science fiction and bluegrass, the Bluegrastonauts show isn’t quite like anything you’ve ever seen. Dressed as space travelers from the year 2437, the band takes audiences through a musical “history of the future”, including a first-hand account of the Apocalypse of 2137, the subsequent colonization of the moon, and the dangers of playing hopscotch in deep space. The show reaches the heights of absurdity while confronting deeply humanist issues of love, disillusionment, and mortality. 314-776-4200

Cliterally Speaking: The Podcast

Fri., Oct. 25, 7 p.m.
The Monocle 4510 Manchester Ave, St. Louis St. Louis - The Grove


314-932-7003

Black Cat Ball

Fri., Oct. 25, 7-11 p.m.
Blanchette Park 1900 W. Randolph St., St. Charles St. Charles

Buy Tickets$31.00

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Memorial Hall, Blanchette Park. Enjoy a Spooktacular evening with Pride St. Charles and friends! Black Cat Ball is a 21+ event with a Drag Show, Creepy Costume Contest, Silent Auction, Dancing, Chills & Thrills. Costumes! Glitter! Spirits! Support the LGBTQIA community Tickets are $31 in advance, $40 at the door. Included: Boooos and Spirits, Monster Munchies, Candy.

The Music in Me: Laka at Sole House

Fri., Oct. 25, 7:15-9:15 p.m.

Buy Tickets$12-18


@ Sole House STL, 911 North Tucker Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63101
Join us for an intimate evening of music by Laka at the beautiful, historic venue Sole House. Laka will perform acoustic soul classics by Etta James, Al Green, Bill Withers, Aretha Franklin, and James Brown, along with a few modern selections! Doors open at 6:30p. First set: 7:15-8:00p. Second set: 8:30-9:15p. Drinks will be available for purchase at the bar. Onsite gated parking is included. Tickets are $12 in advance and $18 at the door. 314-896-0609

The YOURS Underground/Indie Awards Show

Fri., Oct. 25, 7:30 p.m.
Fubar 3108 Locust St, St. Louis St. Louis - Midtown

Buy Tickets$10-$12


314-289-9050

Earth Walk — A Sacred Concert Celebrating Mother Earth

Fri., Oct. 25, 7:30 p.m.

Buy TicketsFREE


It will be a time of artistic inspiration blending jazz, dance and poetic reflection. The Oîkos Ensemble will be joined by the Skystone Conservatory Dance Ensemble and the Logos Readers. We will share earth stories celebrating the beauty of Mother Earth and the challenges of climate change facing our global community. After the concert we will be sharing resources and ideas for personal involvement as we face this global crisis. 314-962-0475

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