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Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery

Sundays, 2 p.m. and Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Oct. 29

What if Arthur Conan Doyle was more interested in Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson getting laughs than in solving another thorny case? This is the conceit of Ken Ludwig's comedy Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery. Something stalks the Baskerville family, killing off the male heirs with startling precision; is it the fabled beast that prowls the moors, or is it a greedy relative? Holmes and Watson take the case, and in due course an ensemble cast of three essays the 35 different characters entangled in the investigation. Insight Theatre Company closes its 2017 season with the fast-paced comedy. Performances take place at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and at 2 p.m. Sunday (October 12 to 29) at .Zack (3224 Locust Street; www.insighttheatrecompany.com). Tickets are $20 to $35. $20-$35

.Zack (map)
3224 Locust St
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-304-3602
Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery

A Century of Japanese Prints

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 28, 2018

Japan had a long history of woodblock printing (ukiyo-e) that, although now recognized for their artistic qualities, were at the time purely commercial works. That began to change in the mid-nineteenth century, as Japanese artists were exposed to Western printmaking. These early modern artists began the creative print movement, which was motivated by a desire to explore the artistic possibilities of Japan's traditional hand-carved woodblock printing methods. Artists such as Kobayakawa Kiyoshi and Hashiguchi Goyō created portraits of modern Japanese society in prints that are both beautiful works of art and incredible documents of an era. The Saint Louis Art Museum displays a treasure trove of them in the new exhibit, A Century of Japanese Prints. The show opens on Friday, August 11, and remains up through January 28. Admission is free. free admission

New Media Series: Amy Granat

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Nov. 12

In the nineteenth century the American Dream was tied up in Manifest Destiny. We would spread across the continent from the East to the West on foot, by wagon or train. Once the West was won, the dream changed and became nice home, a fast car and an open road. But what is the American Dream today, when we cover the land from to sea to sea and all frontiers are gone? Amy Granat's Cars, Trees, Houses, Beaches is a silent 16mm film loop of Hawaiian beaches, muscle cars and modernist homes, among them Kirkwood's own Russell and Ruth Goetz Krauss house, which was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The film ruminates on these conquered frontiers, many of which are once again the stuff of dreams for Americans. The Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org) presents Granat's film as part of its long-running New Media Series. It shows on an endless loop from July 14 to November 12 in gallery 301. Admission is free, and the museum is open every day except Monday. free admission

Steve McCurry: The Importance of Elsewhere

Tuesdays-Saturdays. Continues through Feb. 3, 2018

Photographer Steve McCurry created an iconic image with his portrait of a young Afghani girl and her haunting, bottomless eyes, which stared down his lens and seemingly into the innermost chamber of your heart. But that photograph isn't the extent of McCurry's work. For almost 40 years he has been traveling the world, photographing people in India, the temples of Angkor Wat, burning oil fields in Kuwait, and indeed, even an entire series on the striking eyes he spots in people's faces the world over. Steve McCurry: The Importance of Elsewhere, the new exhibition of his work at the Sheldon (3648 Washington Boulevard; www.thesheldon.org), features 37 photographs made by McCurry during his journey. The exhibit opens with a free reception from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, October 6. The show continues through February 3, 2018, and the gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday. Admission is free. free admission

Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900
Steve McCurry: The Importance of Elsewhere

Killer Napkins: Crummy Deities

Fridays, Saturdays, 12-3 p.m. Continues through Oct. 28

Killer Napkins (who also goes by Jason Spencer) is a St. Louis artist who combines his passion for horror with things that are conventionally cute. His paintings range from totemic combinations of icons to the grislier realms of fantasy/nightmare; his sculptures hew closer to pure horror, with an emphasis on disembodied heads and damaged faces. His exhibition, Killer Napkins: Crummy Deities, showcases new work in both painting and sculpture and should feel seasonally appropriate. Crummy Deities opens with a public reception from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday, October 13, at Hoffman LaChance Contemporary (2713 Sutton Boulevard, Maplewood; www.hoffmanlachancefineart.com). The show remains up through the end of the month, and the gallery is open noon to 3 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. free admission

Hoffman LaChance Contemporary (map)
2713 Sutton Blvd.
Maplewood
phone 314-960-5322
Killer Napkins: Crummy Deities

Kader Attia: Reason's Oxymorons

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 8, 2018

Human beings' adaptability is what allows people to gradually come to terms with catastrophic change and trauma. In the Western world, we consider it possible for someone who has experienced a tragedy to "heal," thereby erasing a wrong. But the non-Western world doesn't always believe that disaster can be plastered over. In some countries, the scars and imperfections are celebrated. These conflicting ideas of past damage are the inspiration for French-Algerian artist Kader Attia's exhibition Reason's Oxymorons. Attia interviewed and filmed historians, storytellers, philosophers and ethnographers from around the world discussing their cultural ideas of healing psychic damage. These films are then continuously played on an array of televisions placed throughout a maze of gray cubicles. The viewer can pass from cube to cube, gaining exposure to previously foreign worldviews. Kader Attia: Reason's Oxymorons opens with a free public reception from 7 to 9 p.m. tonight at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum on the Washington University campus (1 Brookings Drive; www.kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu). The show remains up through January 8, and the museum is open every day except Tuesday. free admission

Mickalene Thomas: Mentors, Muses and Celebrities

Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through Dec. 31

New York-based artist Mickalene Thomas pursues the perception of black women in the spotlight in her new exhibit, >Mentors, Muses and Celebrities. Known mostly for her rhinestone, acrylic and enamel paintings, here Thomas explores how gender and beauty are represented in modern society through film and video installations. Her twelve-minute, two-channel video projection Do I Look Like a Lady? features images of Eartha Kitt, Moms Mabley and Whitney Houston, all of them black women who attained a level of power and fame. Thomas draws equal inspiration from the three women at the heart of the film adaptation of The Color Purple, as played by Oprah Winfrey, Whoopi Goldberg and Margaret Avery. The juxtaposition of three characters who had little to no power in their lives being portrayed by three exceptionally powerful women is the essence of Thomas' work. Who decides which women are beautiful? What is the source of their power? Who controls the image? Mickalene Thomas: Mentors, Muses and Celebrities opens with a free public reception at 7 p.m. tonight at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org). The show remains up through December 31, and the museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. free admission

Hamlet

Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m., Saturdays, 4 p.m., Tuesdays, 7 p.m., Sun., Oct. 22, 2 p.m., Wed., Oct. 25, 7 p.m., Saturdays, 4 & 8 p.m., Sun., Oct. 29, 2 p.m., Wed., Nov. 1, 1:30 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 5, 2 & 7 p.m. Continues through Nov. 5

In its 50 years of operation, the Repertory Theatre St. Louis has somehow never mounted a production of William Shakespeare's Hamlet. That all changes this year — the company's 51st season. Prince Hamlet mopes around castle Elsinore, trying to figure out what to do with his life now that his father the king is dead and his Uncle Claudius has assumed both the throne and the heart of his sister-in-law, Hamlet's mother. When his father's ghost tells Hamlet that Claudius is a murderous usurper, the young man finds his bloody purpose in life. Will he throw away everything to avenge his father? The Repertory Theatre St. Louis presents its first-ever Hamlet Tuesday through Sunday (October 12 to November 5) at Webster University's Loretto-Hilton Center (130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves; www.repstl.org). Tickets are $18.50 to $89. $18.50-$89

Urinetown the Musical

Sundays, 2 p.m. and Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Oct. 29

In the near future of Urinetown the Musical, having a private toilet is a crime. A long-lasting drought has dangerously depleted the world's water supply, leaving public pay toilets as the only sane option for the citizens' relief. But the CEO of the company that runs the toilets wants to raise the rates again, which will make the daily tinkle an unaffordable luxury for the poorest citizens. And don't even think about whizzing in the streets — that's a crime punishable by lifetime banishment to the grim peenal colony (tee-hee) called Urinetown. Greg Kotis and Mark Hollmann's dark satire of modern life follows the heroic Bobby Strong as he attempts to free the people from the grip of corporatized urination. The Washington University Performing Arts Department presents Urinetown the Musical at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday (October 20 to 29) at Washington University's Edison Theatre (6465 Forsyth Boulevard; www.edison.wustl.edu). Tickets are $10 to $20. $10-$20

Buy Tickets
Edison Theatre (map)
6445 Forsyth Blvd.
Clayton
phone 314-935-6543
Urinetown the Musical

The Rocky Horror Picture Show

Fridays, Saturdays, 11:55 p.m. Continues through Oct. 28
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The Tivoli Theatre's annual Halloween screening of The Rocky Horror Picture Show features a live shadow cast (the Samurai Electricians). $10

Landmark Tivoli Theatre (map)
6350 Delmar Blvd.
Delmar/ The Loop
phone 314-727-7271

The Rocky Horror Picture Show

Fridays, Saturdays, 11:55 p.m. Continues through Oct. 28
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Just like Christmas trees in December and Uncle Sam/Betsy Ross erotic cosplay in July, you can't celebrate Halloween without indulging in The Rocky Horror Picture Show sometime in October. The film moved past "cult classic" status once it entered the Library of Congress' National Film Registry in 2006, making it officially a bona fide classic. Richard O'Brien's immortal love story tells the tale of decent American couple Brad and Janet (a couple of squares) who break down on the road and seek help at the castle of Dr. Frank-N-Furter on the same night he's about to bring his greatest, most virile creation to life. There's very little horror (unless you're terrified by alternative lifestyles), but a whole lot of singing about what's hot and being brave enough to live out your dreams. The Rocky Horror Picture Show is shown at 11:55 p.m. Friday and Saturday (October 20 to 28) at the Landmark Tivoli Theatre (6350 Delmar Boulevard, University City; www.landmarktheatres.com) as part of the Reel Late series. The Samurai Electricians returns to perform the essential role of "shadow cast," which recreates the movie while it screens. Tickets are $10. $10

Landmark Tivoli Theatre (map)
6350 Delmar Blvd.
Delmar/ The Loop
phone 314-727-7271
The Rocky Horror Picture Show

#1 in Civil Rights

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through April 15, 2018

St. Louis' history as a wellspring of civil rights activism is deep and impressive. Dred and Harriet Scott's legal fight to be free, Mary Meachum's bold actions leading slaves to freedom across the Mississippi River, the Jefferson Bank protesters organizing to get access to better jobs, Percy Green and the daring VP Ball invaders who challenged St. Louis' powerful elite and the exclusionary nature of their private party — all of these people fought the good fight in St. Louis. #1 in Civil Rights, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; www.mohistory.org) chronicles the history of the civil rights movement in the metro area through artifacts, historical photos, oral histories, art work and actors' performances. Every key moment in the black struggle for equality is covered up to the present day, with artifacts collected by the museum staff following the killing of Michael Brown and the resulting civil unrest in Ferguson playing a major role in the exhibit. #1 in Civil Rights opens on Saturday, March 11, and continues through April 15, 2018. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
#1 in Civil Rights

Exposure 19: Jumbled Time

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 2

Gallery 210's long-running Exposure series brings together local artists who work in the same media or pursue the same ideas in their work. In the case of Exposure 19: Jumbled Time, Stan Chisholm, Lizzy Martinez and Adam Turl all share an interest in narrative art, whether that's the sometimes enigmatic phrases Chisholm stamps out on bricks and other building materials, or Turl's set-like assemblages of objects and paint that hint at the personality of their subject. Jumbled Time opens with a free artists' reception from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, August 26, at Gallery 210 on the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus (1 University Drive at Natural Bridge Road; 314-516-5976). The show remains up through December 2, and the gallery is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. free admission

University of Missouri-St. Louis-Gallery 210 (map)
1 University Dr at Natural Bridge Road
North St. Louis County
phone 314-516-5976
Exposure 19: Jumbled Time

Jefferson Barracks Telephone Museum

Wednesdays-Sundays, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Continues through Dec. 31
phone 314-416-8004
jeffersonbarrackstelephonemuseum@yahoo.com
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Housed in a beautifully restored 1896 building, the museum features an extensive collection of telephones manufactured from the early 1900s through the 2000s, hundreds of pieces of telephone-related equipment and memorabilia and military telephones from WWII through the Vietnam War. It is located in the historic Jefferson Barracks Park, a 15 minute drive south of downtown St. Louis. The self-guided, accessible museum has many hands-on, how-things-work displays. The displays were created to inspire an interest in engineering and history. Guided tours are available for groups of 10 or more and should be scheduled at least two weeks before the tour. $3 - $5

http://www.jbtelmuseum.org

Retrospective of Mary Engelbreit

Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Oct. 29
greendoorartgallery@gmail.com

Green Door art gallery presents “Retrospective of Mary Engelbreit-Originials“ Reception will be Friday, September 8, 2017 from 5-9 pm featuring Mary Engelbreit’s original drawings and paintings and over 35 other artists. There will be a Engelbreit book signing on Saturday, September 9, 2017. Mary Engelbreit’s warm-hearted style has endeared her to consumers for 40 years—her colors are luminous, the designs ornate. It is a style that captures hearts everywhere. Mary Engelbreit Studios is located in Mary’s hometown, St. Louis, Missouri. Artwork available from September 8 thru October 29, 2017. Opening reception from 5:45 to 9 p.m. Friday, September 8. Thirty other local artists will be exhibiting with artwork free

http://www.greendoorartgallery.com
Green Door Art Gallery (map)
21 N. Gore Ave.
Webster Groves
phone 314-402-1959
Retrospective of Mary Engelbreit
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