Events Today in St. Louis

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Printing the Pastoral: Visions of the Countryside in 18th-Century Europe

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 1


The consumers of middle- and upper-class society in the eighteenth century developed a passion for rural scenes of traditional country life, just as the introduction of copperplate printing to the textile industry made it possible to produce fabrics with intricately detailed scenes printed upon them. Textile factories began churning out yards of fabric with shepherds, village fêtes and strolling couples for a market that could afford to buy them as furniture coverings, bedding and curtains. Printing the Pastoral: Visions of the Countryside in 18th-Century Europe, an exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum, includes numerous examples of the craft, several of which have never before been shown at the museum. The centerpiece of the exhibit is a reconstructed bed with printed bedding and curtains. Printing the Pastoral continues through December 1 in gallery 100 at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Admission is free. 314-721-0072

Ai Weiwei: Bare Life

Sundays, 12-5 p.m. and Mondays, Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 5


The Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum (1 Brookings Drive; kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu) officially reopens with a bang. Chinese artist and dissident Ai Weiwei presents a major exhibition of work that spans the past twenty years of his career, some of which has never before been shown in the United States. Divided into two parts, Bare Life and Rupture, the show features monumental exhibitions such as Forever Bicycles (2019) and Through (2007-2008). The former is a commemorative arch built with Chinese-made bicycles, their carefully positioned tires lining up to create the image of telescoping lenses; the latter is an intersecting series of wooden pillars that pierce the surface of Qing Dynasty wooden tables. The work evokes China's own interrupted and intentionally erased history. Ai Weiwei: Bare Life also includes sculptures, photographs, films and a triptych constructed of LEGO bricks. The show runs from September 28 to January 5. 314-935-4523

Sam Falls: Conception

Through Dec. 22, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.


Sam Falls' artworks are inspired by, and at least in part created by, nature. For his exhibition at Laumeier Sculpture Park, Falls laid a canvas covered with dry pigments on ground in the park's woodland. Left there for several days, the dew, whatever rain fell and the sunlight that passed through the leaves overhead and onto the canvas made a record of the local flora. In addition to his large-scale nature paintings, Falls has also mosaicked a pair of steel I-beams with tiles featuring native plants grown especially by Laumeier's master gardener at Falls' request. The finished beams are placed standing upright in the forest, reflecting and refracting the natural landscape that surrounds them. Sam Falls: Conception opens with a free public reception from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, August 24, at the Aronson Fine Arts Center in Laumeier Sculpture Park (12580 Rott Road, Sunset Hills; www.laumeier.org). Falls' work remains on display through December 22. 314-615-5278

Foundations of Freedom

Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through Jan. 31
Field House Museum 634 S. Broadway, St. Louis St. Louis - Downtown

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Dred Scott was a slave who'd been taken from Missouri, a slave state, to Illinois, a free one. Yet he remained in bondage. In 1846 Scott sued for freedom from enslavement for himself and his wife Harriet, arguing that his two years of residing in a free state should make him a citizen under the doctrine of "once free, always free." The case was fought in various courts from 1846 to 1857, with victories and setbacks along the way. After the Scotts' patron could no longer pay their legal fees, St. Louis attorney Roswell Field took the case pro bono and continued the fight to win the Scotts' freedom. It was an unpopular cause in Missouri, but the Scotts' eventual defeat helped further stiffen the spine of the abolitionist cause. Roswell Field's home is now the Field House Museum, which opens its new exhibition, Foundations of Freedom, in honor of Black History Month. The exhibit tells the story of the Scotts' long legal struggle, other freedom suits and the national conversation about the legality of slavery in the nineteenth century. Foundations of Freedom opens Saturday, February 2, at the Field House Museum (634 South Broadway; www.eugenefieldhouse.org). It remains on display through January 31, 2020, and the museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. Admission is $5 to $10. 314-421-4689

The Shape Of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through March 22


The Thelma and Bert Ollie Memorial Collection of abstract art officially went on display Tuesday, September 17, at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). The collection was gifted to the museum in 2017 by New Jersey-based art collector Ronald Maurice Ollie and his wife, Monique McRipley Ollie, in honor of Ronald's parents. The elder Ollies often visited the Saint Louis Art Museum with their children, instilling a lifelong passion for art. Ronald and Monique Ollie together collected art for many years, particularly work by contemporary black artists. Among the treasures in the exhibit, The Shape Of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection, are important works such as Robert Blackburn's lithograph Faux Pas, Mary Lovelace O'Neal's City Lights and Frank Bowling's Fishes, Wishes and Star Apple Blue, which demonstrates Bowling's innovative painting technique. In all, 40 works are displayed in the show, which draws its title from a poem by Quincy Troupe. The St. Louis native was inspired by the artworks in the Ollie Collection and wrote "The Shape of Abstraction; for Ron Ollie" in response. Troupe's poem is included in the exhibit catalog. 314-721-0072

Carlos Zamora: cART

Through Dec. 22


Art is something to be appreciated, and St. Louis-based illustrator/graphic designer Carlos Zamora's cART exhibition at Laumeier Sculpture Park is one of those examples. Zamora transformed three golf carts into kinetic sculptures by installing his oversized paper boat sculptures on top and wrapping the bodies with printed vinyl slogans. A fourth large paper boat sculpture will be placed in a creek on the Laumeier grounds. The Cuban native drew inspiration for the project from his heritage, specifically the song "Baraquio de papel" — "Little Paper Boat" — as well as Cuban car culture, nursery rhymes and politics.

Carlos Zamora: cART opens with a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, July 25, at Laumeier Sculpture Park (12580 Rott Road; www.laumeier.org). The following night a Havana Night celebration takes place in the park's Aronson Fine Arts Center from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., with mojitos, snacks, "Casino" dance lessons and a screenprinted poster station. Tickets are $25, but admission to the park and Zamora's boat sculptures is free. The exhibition continues through December 22, and the park is open daily from 8 a.m. to 30 minutes past sunset.

314-615-5278

Pulitzer Prize Photographs and In Focus: St. Louis Post-Dispatch Photographs

Through Jan. 20, 2020
Missouri History Museum 5700 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis St. Louis - Forest Park

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Photographs are a key element of narrative storytelling, which is why it's so baffling that newspapers have deemed staff photographers an expendable luxury. You probably recognize many of the photographs that won Pulitzer Prizes, from Joe Rosenthal's shot Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, to Alan Diaz's memorable photo of U.S. federal agents seizing Elian Gonzalez, to St. Louis Post-Dispatch photographer Robert Cohen's 2014 image of a protestor throwing a tear-gas canister back at police while protesting the killing of Michael Brown. These photographs shock us, inspire feelings of pride and anger, and inform us, just as great written journalism does. The Newseum in Washington created a traveling exhibit of some of the most beautiful images to win the Pulitzer, and it's a show that will make its St. Louis debut on Saturday, August 3, at the Missouri History Museum (5700 Lindell Boulevard; www.mohistory.org). A second exhibition organized by the Missouri History Museum collected 75 photos of everyday life in St. Louis from the Post-Dispatch archives. Pulitzer Prize Photographs and In Focus: St. Louis Post-Dispatch Photographs remain on display through January 20, and admission is free. Parents are cautioned that some of the photographs are intense and may be too much for younger children. 314-746-4599

Howard Barry: Inertia

Tuesdays-Saturdays. Continues through Dec. 9
University of Missouri-St. Louis-Gallery 210 1 University Dr at Natural Bridge Road, Normandy North St. Louis County


Local artist Howard Barry has gained significant attention for his illustrations inspired by the Ferguson protests, but he's not just an activist artist. Barry's drawings are a form of physical therapy and mental therapy. He creates to relieve his frustration with the world and his own pain. Using ink, coffee and various computer programs for effects, Barry creates images of artists, musicians, civil rights pioneers and modern-day protesters, all with an eye for gesture and a gift for imbuing something of his subject's character. James Baldwin's luminous eyes reveal his hurt and anger with the country that rejected him for his blackness and homosexuality, while a barefoot child pushing his way through cotton emerges from a page of sheet music for Billie Holiday's "God Bless the Child." Inertia, an exhibition of Barry's artwork, opens with a free reception from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday, September 14, at Gallery 210 on the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus (1 University Drive at Natural Bridge Road; www. gallery210.umsl.edu). The show remains on display through December 9. 314-516-5976

Soft Scrub

Fridays, Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Wednesdays, Thursdays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Oct. 26
The Luminary 2701 Cherokee St, St. Louis St. Louis - South City


The everyday black household is foreign territory to most of America. There have been a few TV shows (The Jeffersons at the richer end of the spectrum, Good Times at the more financially tenuous) that depicted fictionalized domestic situations, but even those can be considered non-standard families. They certainly weren't entirely relatable to Katherine Simóne Reynolds' own upbringing. Inspired by this dearth of representation, Reynolds asked black male artists to address the idea of black home life from a male perspective. The exhibition Soft Scrub challenges stereotypes and reveals lessons learned about cleanliness, division of labor and social expectations. Soft Scrub opens with a free reception from 7 to 10 p.m. Friday, September 13, at the Luminary (2701 Cherokee Street; www.theluminaryarts.com). Participating artists include Vaughn Davis Jr., Mitchell Squire, Cameron Granger and Keyon Gaskin. The exhibit remains up through October 26. 314-773-1533

Stephanie Syjuco: Rogue States

Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 29

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Artist Stephanie Syjuco was born in Manila and immigrated to the United States with her family when she was three years old, which gave her an American education and an immigrant's eye for our national blindspots. It's these blindspots that inform the art in her exhibition Stephanie Syjuco: Rogue States, which opens with a free reception at 7 p.m. Friday, September 6, at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org). The title of the show comes from her installation of 22 flags that were used to represent the flags of made-up nations in various American films. Also in the exhibit is her large-scale installation Neutral Calibration Studies (Ornament + Crime), which comprises artifacts representing both colonizer and colonized societies. Cultural objects such as wicker chairs and traditional rugs Syjuco purchased online, cardboard cutouts of people and actual artifacts are mixed together in a larger-than-life diorama. Nestled in the background is a color photograph of the "stone-age" tribe of the Tasaday, found on a remote island in the Philippines in the early 1970s, who were actually modern people posed by a photographer. Rogue States continues through December 29, and the museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. 314-535-4660

SSM Health St Clare Hospital Auxiliary Linen Sale

Wed., Oct. 16, 7 a.m.-3 p.m.


@ SSM Health St. Clare Hospital, 1015 Bowles Ave., Fenton, MO 63026
Come purchase beautiful sheet sets, bed linens, comforters, Sherpa throws, pillows, etc. at St Clare Auxiliary's Linen Sale on Tuesday, October 15th & Wednesday, October 16th on the Garden Level of St. Clare Hospital - Fenton under the stairwell by the Golf Ball Wall from 7AM until 3PM. Cash, Checks, Credit card, SSM Health St Clare Hospital Employees payroll deduction accepted. All proceeds to benefit the purchase of a 3D Mammography Unit & other ongoing hospital projects. If you have any questions, please contact Ginny Goede, Auxiliary President, @ 314-660-3026. 3146603026

Missouri Day: Celebrating Missouri’s Artistic Heritage

Wed., Oct. 16, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.


For nearly 200 years Missouri has served as a hub for artistic innovation. From quilt making to oil painting, and from Ragtime to blacksmithing, Missouri has been the birthplace of hundreds of folk artists, musicians, authors, dancers, actors, and more. Join us at the First Missouri State Capitol State Historic Site on Missouri Day to celebrate Missouri’s unique and longstanding love of the arts. During this family friendly event visitors will be able to engage with modern artists and learn about the history of the arts in our state. There will be crafts, music, dance, games, storytelling, and more! 636-940-3322

Kim Fuller & Carolbeth True, “Songs We Can’t Forget”

Wed., Oct. 16, 10-11 a.m.
The Sheldon 3648 Washington Blvd., St. Louis St. Louis - Grand Center

Buy Tickets$18 orchestra / $15 balcony


Jazz vocalist Kim Fuller and pianist Carolbeth True perform great songs from the 1950s, ‘60s and ‘70s, including well-known songs made famous by Billie Holiday, Nancy Wilson and Stevie Wonder, and some lesser-known gems that didn’t top the charts but should have! Enjoy complimentary coffee and pastries at 9 a.m. in the beautiful Louis Spiering Room, just before these one-hour concerts at 10 a.m. in the historic Sheldon Concert Hall. 314-533-9900

Transit Stop Transformation Project Public Meetings

Wed., Oct. 16, 9-11 a.m.
Foundation Grounds 7298 Manchester Road, Maplewood Maplewood


Maplewood area residents, business leaders and transit riders are invited to attend public meetings to determine what the community would like to see at the space around a Maplewood MetroBus Stop. Those unable to attend the meetings can also provide feedback on the project via an online survey that can be found at www.cmt-stl.org. The partners will use the feedback from the Oct. 15 and Oct. 16 public meetings and the insights from the online survey to develop two or more conceptual designs for the space. The “Transit Stop Transformation Project” is expected to be completed in Spring 2020. 314-231-7272

Happy Hour with the St. Louis Publishers Association

Wed., Oct. 16, 6-9 p.m.
Earthbound Brewing 2710 Cherokee St., St. Louis St. Louis - South City

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Wednesday, October 16. 6:00 – 9:00pm. Share a drink and make some friends at the St. Louis Publishers Association Happy Hour at Earthbound Brewing. Meet fellow writers, editors, illustrators and others in the self-publishing community. No registration required. No cost to attend. Food and non-alcoholic beverages will be available. Earthbound Brewing. 2724 Cherokee St. St. Louis, MO 63118. https://www.stlouispublishers.org/events 314-504-3532

Wage War

Wed., Oct. 16, 7:30 p.m.
Fubar 3108 Locust St, St. Louis St. Louis - Midtown

Buy Tickets$18.50


314-289-9050

Scotty Sire

Wed., Oct. 16, 8 p.m.
Delmar Hall 6133 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis Delmar/ The Loop


w/ Toddy Smith, Bruce Wiegner, Chris Bloom 314-726-6161

Smooth Hound Smith

Wed., Oct. 16, 8 p.m.
Old Rock House 1200 S. 7th St., St. Louis St. Louis - Soulard

Buy Tickets$12-$15


314-588-0505

Masked Intruder

Wed., Oct. 16, 8 p.m.
Off Broadway 3509 Lemp Ave., St. Louis St. Louis - South City


w/ The Bombpops, Tightwire 314-498-6989

Ruston Kelly

Wed., Oct. 16, 8 p.m.
Blueberry Hill - The Duck Room 6504 Delmar Blvd., University City Delmar/ The Loop


w/ Donovan Woods 314-727-4444

Plague Vendor

Wed., Oct. 16, 8 p.m.
Fubar 3108 Locust St, St. Louis St. Louis - Midtown

Buy Tickets$15


314-289-9050

Rockin’ Johnny Burgin Band

Wed., Oct. 16, 10 p.m.
BB's Jazz, Blues & Soups 700 S. Broadway, St. Louis St. Louis - Downtown


314-436-5222

Totems: Personal Stories in Fiber

Mondays-Fridays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Nov. 1
Bluebird Park 225 Kiefer Creek Road, Ballwin Manchester/ Ballwin


Visitors will enter an enchanted forest of 3-dimensional art quilts between 4 and 6 feet tall. Each totem is the artist's unique creative expression in fiber, fabric, embellishment and stitch. 314-704-1501

Engeldark Art Exhibit

Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Nov. 8
Green Door Art Gallery 21 N. Gore Ave., Webster Groves Webster Groves


Green Door art gallery is proud to present “Engeldark: Because nobody’s bright and cheerful all the time…” Check out the shadier side of Mary Engelbreit in this exhibit of original black and white drawings paired with quotes that are snarky, straightforward and loaded with attitude! These works of art will be on display and available for sale from October 2 through November 8, 2019.The opening reception is Friday October 11, 2019 from 5:00-8:00 pm and is free and open to the public. Mary Engelbreit will be present at the reception. 314-202-4071

The Shape of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection

Through March 8, 2020, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.


The Shape of Abstraction: Selections from the Ollie Collection presents 40 abstract paintings, drawings, and prints by acclaimed black artists drawn from and celebrating the transformative gift of the Thelma and Bert Ollie Memorial Art Collection. In 2017, Ollie and his wife Monique gifted the Museum with 81 abstract works in honor of his parents, a collection that has added depth and breadth to the Museum’s holdings of works by black artists. 314.721.0072

Stewart D Halperin: One World - Five Decades and Six Continents

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Oct. 19


A visual journey through time and space – from the rainforests of Africa to the streets of New York City and points in between. Halperin found his photographic roots in the jungles of Tanzania studying chimpanzees along with Jane Goodall. During this time while observing the chimps Stewart developed a keen sense of observation- and what he now considers the most important element of good photography- the gift of time. Mentored by photographer Ernst Haas, Halperin traveled the world and documented his adventures. On display until October 19th at IPHF. 314-535-1999

Invent A Musical Instrument - Selections from The Sheldon's SOLID Program

Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, 12-8 p.m. Continues through Jan. 21
The Sheldon 3648 Washington Blvd., St. Louis St. Louis - Grand Center

Buy TicketsAdmission is Free


A selection of inventive musical instruments by students from over 30 area schools are featured in this exhibition. Created during the 2018 and 2019 school years, the instruments represent the results of The Sheldon’s SOLID (Science of Learning Instrument Design) program, through which students use the Engineering Cycle to build instruments out of recycled materials. SOLID is a STEAM-based program, supported by the St. Louis Science Center. 314-533-9900

Thomas Sleet: Integration: Sacred Space

Tuesdays-Fridays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through Oct. 26
Bruno David Gallery 7513 Forsyth Blvd., Clayton Clayton


Since his youth, Thomas Sleet was always fascinated with nature. He tells stories about growing up in Kirkwood in the 60’s, playing in creeks and running around the neighborhood with his siblings. This fascination followed him well into his adult years, showing up in his sculptures, paintings, prints, and more. True to concepts consistent in past works, Integration: Scared Space continues with Sleet’s theme of intersecting the natural and the manufactured. His new wall mounted pieces highlight his carefully designed experiments with light, space, arrangement/placement, and the concept of the individual intersecting with the whole—the collective. 1.314.696-2377

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