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Dine on Dance

Fri., Sept. 21, 12 p.m.

Karlovsky & Company Dance celebrates its fifteenth straight year of bringing free dance to the public with this year's two Dine on Dance shows. As is tradition, the company will perform a program of newly choreographed, site-specific pieces at Strauss Park (Washington and North Grand boulevards; www.karlovskydance.org) at noon on Friday, September 21. This year's choreographers are Vance Baldwin and Elise Marie Ringenberg, Dawn Karlovsky and dance historian Alice Bloch. Performing traditional folk dances of Colombia, Grupo Atlantico will make a special appearance, while a new piece by Ashley Tate features dance students from the Grand Center Arts Academy. Admission is free, so quit staring at the internet and go outside to get some culture under some sun. A second performance minus the arts-academy students takes place at noon on Friday, September 28, at the Old Post Office Plaza (Ninth and Locust streets). free admission

Strauss Park (map)
Washington & N. Grand boulevards
St. Louis - Grand Center Dine on Dance

BookFest St. Louis

Fri., Sept. 21, 7 p.m. and Sat., Sept. 22, 10:30 a.m.
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Readers, start your ... glasses, maybe? BookFest St. Louis is back for a second year, with an impressive array of authors from all corners of the Dewey decimal system. Sally Field starts the party at 7 p.m. Friday, September 21, with a discussion about her new memoir, In Pieces, at the Chase Park Plaza (212 North Kingshighway; $37 for one person and one copy of the book). Day two gets underway Saturday, September 22, at 10:30 a.m., with A. LaFaye and Deborah Zemke hosting a children's storytime with costumed characters and photo opportunities at the Schlafly Branch of the St. Louis Public Library (225 North Euclid Avenue). It's off to the races after that, with panels ranging from Deborah Eisenberg, Rebecca Makkai, Anne Valentine and Lucy Jane Bledsoe discussing "Fresh Fierce Fiction" at noon to Michael Isikoff and Sarah Kendzior addressing the worst presidential election ever and authoritarian states in "Russian Roulette: Global Politics in the Age of Trump." If you're into spoken word, Cheeraz Gormon, Paul Tran and Jacqui Germain will be waiting for you at 2 p.m., and at 4 p.m. Wayétu Moore, Bethany Morrow and Marcia Douglas will get into the heady delights of magical realism and speculative fiction at "Alternate Realities: Re-Imagining the Past & The Future." The vast majority of the panels are free to attend, and it all takes place in the Central West End. Visit www.bookfeststl.com for a full schedule. most panels are free, but some events require a fee; check the website for details

Left Bank Books (map)
399 N Euclid Ave
St. Louis - Central West End
phone 314-367-6731
BookFest St. Louis

Q in the Lou

Fri., Sept. 21, 4-9 p.m., Sat., Sept. 22, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 23, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.

There's only one number you need to know to understand what Q in the Lou is all about: 18,000. That's the number of pounds of meat that will be barbecued in Kiener Plaza (500 Chestnut Street; www.qinthelou.com) this weekend. From 4 to 9 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday (September 21 to 23) that meat will be given the smoky respect it deserves from pitmasters Marlando "Big Moe" Cason, Carey Bringle and hometown favorites Mike Johnson, Christina Fitzgerald and Mike Emerson. If that's not enough, you can reserve one of eighteen slots in the Rib Rumble on Saturday and Sunday, which gives you ten minutes to eat as many ribs as you can. You can compete for the sheer joy of it, but prizes go to the biggest and fastest eaters. The Pernikoff Brothers, Hillary Fitz, the Darrells and Nate Lowry play live during the festival, and admission is free. You pay for BBQ and beer as you go, and VIP options are available. free admission

To Survive on This Shore: Photographs and Interviews with Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Older Adults

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Oct. 10
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While the transgender/gender-fluid community continues to become more welcome in American society with every passing year, for the most part, its younger members tend to be most visible within the mainstream. Youth is inappropriately valued in our culture, but you can be certain that a growing number of older trans and gender-non-conforming people are out there living their best lives. Photographer Jess T. Dugan and social worker Vanessa Fabbre spent more than five years traveling the nation to photograph and record the life stories of this hidden demographic, finding subjects in both big cities and small towns. The duo's work is compiled in a new book and exhibition, both titled To Survive on This Shore: Photographs and Interviews with Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Older Adults. On Thursday, September 13, the exhibit opens and the book is officially released at a dual reception from 5 to 8 p.m. at Projects + Gallery (4733 McPherson Avenue; www.projects-gallery.com). A dozen large-scale photos of participants are on display, along with ten 18-by-24-inch portraits; all of them include a written narrative about the subject's life. The show continues through October 10. free admission

Projects + Gallery (map)
4733 McPherson Ave
St. Louis - Central West End
phone 314-696-8678
To Survive on This Shore: Photographs and Interviews with Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Older Adults

Chinese Buddhist Art, 10th-15th Centuries

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through Sept. 30

Very rarely does an art exhibition include the actual wall an artist worked on, but the Saint Louis Art Museum does so for Chinese Buddhist Art, 10th-15th Centuries. A six-foot-by-four-foot section of a temple wall that has a painting of the Bodhisattva Akalokiteśvara (Guanyin) on one side is the focal point of the exhibition, and an exceptionally rare object. The show also includes four hanging scrolls, and a never-before-displayed painted, wooden sculpture of a seated arhat, the Buddhist term for a person who has achieved enlightenment. Chinese Buddhist Art, 10th-15th Centuries is open Tuesday through Sunday (March 30 to August 30) in gallery 225 of the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Admission is free. free admission

Love Never Dies

Tuesdays-Fridays, Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun., Sept. 23, 1 & 6:30 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 30, 1 p.m. Continues through Sept. 30

Ten years after her horrific experience at and under the Paris Opera House, famed soprano Christine Daae arrives in America with her husband Raoul and son Gustave. Life hasn't been great; Raoul has both a gambling and drinking problem, and Christine needs to find success in New York to keep the family solvent. But little does the family suspect that its invitation to visit America came from the mysterious Phantom, who now operates (from the shadows, of course) a successful attraction at Coney Island. Can the Phantom reclaim Christine's love, which he possessed for one brief night, or will she remain loyal to her dissolute husband? The musical Love Never Dies is less a sequel to The Phantom of the Opera than a second story starring the same characters, according to composer Andrew Lloyd Webber. Love Never Dies makes its St. Louis premiere at the Fox Theatre (527 North Grand Boulevard; www.fabulousfox.com) this month. Performances are Tuesday through Sunday (September 18 to 30), and tickets are $35 to $99. $35-$99

Buy Tickets
The Fox Theatre (map)
527 N. Grand Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-534-1111
Love Never Dies

New Media Series: Cyprien Gaillard

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through Sept. 30

Wild rose-ringed parakeets are found in Africa and India — and also in Düsseldorf, Germany. The German variety arrived as pets and then either were released or escaped into the city. The birds have made a home for themselves on one of the city's upscale streets, roosting happily in building façades. Artist Cyprien Gaillard followed the parakeets with a camera as they winged home at twilight. His short film KOE shows flocks of them as they fly past concrete and steel, thousands of miles away from their tropical ancestral lands. The silent film is a commentary on how humanity interferes with nature, and how animals are forced to adapt to a rapidly urbanizing world. KOE is shown on a loop in gallery 301 at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org) as part of the New Media Series. It remains on display Tuesday through Sunday (April 20 to July 15), and admission is free. free admission

Muny Memories: 100 Years on Stage

Through June 2, 2019

The Muny is just about to open its landmark 100th season, and its neighbor, the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBalivere Avenue; www.mohistory.org), celebrates the occasion with an exhibit dedicated to the history of America's largest outdoor theater. Muny Memories: 100 Years on Stage features exhibits that explain the founding of the theater, display favorite memories from stars and staff, and give a look back stage to see how the dedicated technical crew creates and rigs all those sets and lights. You can also take a look at programs from the Muny's long, storied past. Muny Memories opens on Saturday, June 9, and remains on display daily through June 2, 2019. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
Muny Memories: 100 Years on Stage

Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico

Wednesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Fridays, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through Feb. 16, 2019

Lola Álvarez Bravo was a Mexican artist, educator and curator whose life spanned nearly the entire twentieth century. From the 1930s to the 1970s, Álvarez Bravo crisscrossed her way across the country with camera in hand, creating portraits of other working artists. Always shooting, she also made images of regular people and the architecture — both old and new — at a time when Mexico was rapidly growing and transforming. Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico, the new exhibition at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation (3716 Washington Boulevard; www.pulitzerarts.org), features more than 40 of her black-and-white photographs in all their glory. Picturing Mexico opens with a free reception from 6 to 9 p.m. on Friday, September 14. Also debuting the same night are more than 60 sculptures by Ruth Asawa, who often worked with wire. Both shows remain on display through February 16. The Pulitzer is open Wednesday through Saturday. free admission

Pulitzer Arts Foundation (map)
3716 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-754-1850
Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico

Sanford Biggers and Basquiat Before Basquiat: East 12th Street, 1979-1980

Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through Dec. 30

The Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis opens some of the most ambitious and vital shows in its history this month, with a series of exhibitions by, and about, black artists and the black experience. Sanford Biggers works directly with the materials of his forebearers — quilts and African sculptures — only he reshapes and repurposes them as contemporary statements about black identity, history and trauma. Biggers gives found quilts new life with new handwork, encoding personal messages into their original pattern. The fact that the work of an anonymous black craftsman or woman now appears in galleries and museums around the world, even in Biggers' modified form, is both subversive and celebratory. With wooden sculptures, some of which are copies, he dips them in wax and then works them over with firearms. What begins as a statue of a human or human-shaped supernatural being becomes obscured, disfigured and unrecognizable through the violence wrought upon it.

In addition to Biggers' work, CAM presents a show of the private photos of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Basquiat emerged from the New York City hip-hop/punk/graffiti scenes in the 1970s as one-half of the graffiti duo SAMO, along with Al Diaz. The pair together tagged buildings with cryptic phrases denouncing the establishment, politics and religion, always signed "SAMO" (an acronym for "Same Old Shit"). When the duo broke up, Basquiat performed in the noise rock band Test Pattern (later named "Gray") with Vincent Gallo and Michael Holman. He lived on the streets, sold drugs and experimented with Xerox art, painting and drawing. Basquiat Before Basquiat: East 12th Street, 1979-1980 will showcase everything the artist made while living in a small East Village apartment with his friend Alexis Adler before he hit the big time. It's a treasure trove of paintings, sculptures and works on paper, as well as Adler's photographs of his friend.

Both exhibitions open with a free reception from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, September 7, at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org). The shows continue through December 30.

free admission

Storytelling with Jess T. Dugan, Vanessa Fabbre and Sage

Fri., Sept. 21, 6-8 p.m.
phone 314-696-8678
margaret@projects-gallery.com
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Join SAGE of PROMO Fund and the Metro Trans Umbrella Group of St. Louis for a special storytelling event at projects+gallery, organized in conjunction with the exhibition 'To Survive on This Shore: Photographs and Interviews with Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Older Adults', based on the five year project by photographer Jess T. Dugan and social worker Vanessa Fabbre. Free

Projects + Gallery (map)
4733 McPherson Ave
St. Louis - Central West End
phone 314-696-8678

100 Boots: Aditi Machado and Geoffrey G. O’Brien

Fri., Sept. 21, 7 p.m.
phone 314-754-1850
jmeade@pulitzerarts.org
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The 100 Boots Poetry Series presents readings by a range of emerging, mid-career, and established poets from St. Louis and across the United States. Co-organized by Jessica Baran, poet and Associate Director of Curatorial and Program Development at Barrett Barrera & Projects Plus Gallery; and Ted Mathys, poet and educator at St. Louis University. Limited-edition broadsides, created by artist Sage Dawson, will be available for free to audience members, and a selection of the poets’ books are for sale courtesy of Left Bank Books. The first event of the season features readings by poets Aditi Machado and Geoffrey G. O’Brien. free

https://pulitzerarts.org/program/100-boots-aditi-machado-and-geoffrey-g-obrien/
Pulitzer Arts Foundation (map)
3716 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-754-1850

Leroy Jodie Pierson

Fri., Sept. 21, 7 p.m.

$5

BB's Jazz, Blues & Soups (map)
700 S. Broadway
St. Louis - Downtown
phone 314-436-5222

Jonathan McReynolds

Fri., Sept. 21, 8 p.m.

$20-$75

The Firebird (map)
2706 Olive St.
St. Louis - Midtown
phone 314-535-0353

Joe Metzka Band

Fri., Sept. 21, 10 p.m.

$5

BB's Jazz, Blues & Soups (map)
700 S. Broadway
St. Louis - Downtown
phone 314-436-5222
Showing 1-15 of 23 total results in this search.

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