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The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through Oct. 1

Christopher Boone is discovered next to the corpse of his neighbor's dog and is immediately accused of killing her beloved hound. Christopher professes his innocence, but nobody — neither the dog's owner, Mrs. Shears, nor his father — appears to take what he's telling them into account. Of course, Christopher has trouble understanding emotions and personal interaction; he's a bright young man, especially for a fifteen-year-old, but he just doesn't process people that well. So Christopher sets out to find the real dog-killer, which requires him to comprehend motivation and the many ways people fudge the truth. He's also going to have to go to London, a place that overwhelms him even when he's chaperoned by a responsible adult. This time, he'll go it alone. Simon Stephens won the 2015 Tony Award for his modern mystery The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, which is based on the novel by Mark Haddon. The Repertory Theatre St. Louis opens its new season with this unusual coming-of-age story. Performances take place Tuesday through Sunday (September 8 to October 1) at the Loretto-Hilton Center on Webster University's campus (130 Edgar Road; www.repstl.org). Tickets are $18.50 to $89. $18.50-$89

South Pacific

Tuesdays-Sundays. Continues through Oct. 8

If you want to end a season on a high note, it's difficult to beat Rodgers & Hammerstein's >South Pacific. The perennially popular musical has everything: sweeping romance, a pointed lesson about learned prejudice, the loss of innocence and the horrors of war. And we haven't even mentioned the songs yet, which include "There's Nothing Like a Dame" and "Some Enchanted Evening." Stages St. Louis goes brings down the curtain on its 2017 season with the incomparable South Pacific. Performances take place Tuesday through Sunday (September 8 to October 8) at the Robert G. Reim Theatre at the Kirkwood Community Center (111 South Geyer Road, Kirkwood; www.stagesstlouis.org). Tickets are $47 to $63. $47-$63

Robert G. Reim Theatre (map)
111 S. Geyer Road
Kirkwood
phone 314-821-2407
South Pacific

A Century of Japanese Prints

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 28, 2018

Japan had a long history of woodblock printing (ukiyo-e) that, although now recognized for their artistic qualities, were at the time purely commercial works. That began to change in the mid-nineteenth century, as Japanese artists were exposed to Western printmaking. These early modern artists began the creative print movement, which was motivated by a desire to explore the artistic possibilities of Japan's traditional hand-carved woodblock printing methods. Artists such as Kobayakawa Kiyoshi and Hashiguchi Goyō created portraits of modern Japanese society in prints that are both beautiful works of art and incredible documents of an era. The Saint Louis Art Museum displays a treasure trove of them in the new exhibit, A Century of Japanese Prints. The show opens on Friday, August 11, and remains up through January 28. Admission is free. free admission

New Media Series: Amy Granat

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Nov. 12

In the nineteenth century the American Dream was tied up in Manifest Destiny. We would spread across the continent from the East to the West on foot, by wagon or train. Once the West was won, the dream changed and became nice home, a fast car and an open road. But what is the American Dream today, when we cover the land from to sea to sea and all frontiers are gone? Amy Granat's Cars, Trees, Houses, Beaches is a silent 16mm film loop of Hawaiian beaches, muscle cars and modernist homes, among them Kirkwood's own Russell and Ruth Goetz Krauss house, which was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The film ruminates on these conquered frontiers, many of which are once again the stuff of dreams for Americans. The Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org) presents Granat's film as part of its long-running New Media Series. It shows on an endless loop from July 14 to November 12 in gallery 301. Admission is free, and the museum is open every day except Monday. free admission

Howard Jones: Think Rethink

Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Oct. 22

Like many artists, Howard Jones is deeply enamored of his tools. These are the objects that channel the creative vision, after all. But Jones engages with tools beyond merely working with them. He views them as material and media, taking them apart, modifying them and reshaping them into art objects. In Jones' hands a shovel handle sprouts three blades; the handle of a paint brush sprouts a violin neck or an assemblage of pencils; and the legs of a chair curl out in rake heads. His exhibition Howard Jones: Think Rethink features a host of tools that offer an elegant beauty — and sometimes function as well. Think: Rethink opens with a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, August 25, at the Craft Alliance Center of Art + Design (6640 Delmar Boulevard, University City; www.craftalliance.org). The show remains up through October 22, and the gallery is open every day except Monday. free admission

Kader Attia: Reason's Oxymorons

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 8, 2018

Human beings' adaptability is what allows people to gradually come to terms with catastrophic change and trauma. In the Western world, we consider it possible for someone who has experienced a tragedy to "heal," thereby erasing a wrong. But the non-Western world doesn't always believe that disaster can be plastered over. In some countries, the scars and imperfections are celebrated. These conflicting ideas of past damage are the inspiration for French-Algerian artist Kader Attia's exhibition Reason's Oxymorons. Attia interviewed and filmed historians, storytellers, philosophers and ethnographers from around the world discussing their cultural ideas of healing psychic damage. These films are then continuously played on an array of televisions placed throughout a maze of gray cubicles. The viewer can pass from cube to cube, gaining exposure to previously foreign worldviews. Kader Attia: Reason's Oxymorons opens with a free public reception from 7 to 9 p.m. tonight at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum on the Washington University campus (1 Brookings Drive; www.kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu). The show remains up through January 8, and the museum is open every day except Tuesday. free admission

Mickalene Thomas: Mentors, Muses and Celebrities

Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through Dec. 31

New York-based artist Mickalene Thomas pursues the perception of black women in the spotlight in her new exhibit, >Mentors, Muses and Celebrities. Known mostly for her rhinestone, acrylic and enamel paintings, here Thomas explores how gender and beauty are represented in modern society through film and video installations. Her twelve-minute, two-channel video projection Do I Look Like a Lady? features images of Eartha Kitt, Moms Mabley and Whitney Houston, all of them black women who attained a level of power and fame. Thomas draws equal inspiration from the three women at the heart of the film adaptation of The Color Purple, as played by Oprah Winfrey, Whoopi Goldberg and Margaret Avery. The juxtaposition of three characters who had little to no power in their lives being portrayed by three exceptionally powerful women is the essence of Thomas' work. Who decides which women are beautiful? What is the source of their power? Who controls the image? Mickalene Thomas: Mentors, Muses and Celebrities opens with a free public reception at 7 p.m. tonight at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org). The show remains up through December 31, and the museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. free admission

Dot

Sundays, 3 p.m. Continues through Sept. 24

Dotty is not who she once was — and some days, even she can admit that. Gone is the middle-class woman who raised three kids and used to entertain all and sundry during the holidays. In her place is a woman who forgets to take her pills and can't safely prepare her own meals or be trusted alone in her own home. Her daughter Shelly has taken charge of Dotty's care, but Shelly has her own life to get back to. What does Dotty have left? Colman Domingo's play Dot deals with aging, Alzheimer's and the unsettling passing of the baton that happens when children step up to care for their own parents. The Black Rep opens its 41st season with Dot. Performances take place at 7 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday (September 6 to 24) at Washington University's Edison Theatre (6465 Forsyth Boulevard; www.theblackrep.org). Tickets are $15 to $45. $15-$45

Buy Tickets
Edison Theatre (map)
6445 Forsyth Blvd.
Clayton
phone 314-935-6543
Dot

The Feast

Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. and Sundays, 3 p.m. Continues through Oct. 8

Matt and Anna are by all accounts a happy couple. He's a painter with a burgeoning gallery deal, she's a modern business warrior-woman; really, all they can complain about is the groaning and gnashing of the plumbing, but what do you expect in New York? Matt doesn't really start to worry until the sewers begin talking to him. Then everybody he encounters speaks in the same sonorous voice, extolling him to fulfill his great destiny. Cory Finley's The Feast is an eerie comedy about the tenuous boundary separating reality from madness. St. Louis Actors' Studio opens its eleventh season with the Burroughs grad's play. Performances take place at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and at 3 p.m. Sunday (September 22 to October 8) at the Gaslight Theater (358 North Boyle Avenue; www.stlas.org). Tickets are $30 to $35. $30-$35

#1 in Civil Rights

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through April 15, 2018

St. Louis' history as a wellspring of civil rights activism is deep and impressive. Dred and Harriet Scott's legal fight to be free, Mary Meachum's bold actions leading slaves to freedom across the Mississippi River, the Jefferson Bank protesters organizing to get access to better jobs, Percy Green and the daring VP Ball invaders who challenged St. Louis' powerful elite and the exclusionary nature of their private party — all of these people fought the good fight in St. Louis. #1 in Civil Rights, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; www.mohistory.org) chronicles the history of the civil rights movement in the metro area through artifacts, historical photos, oral histories, art work and actors' performances. Every key moment in the black struggle for equality is covered up to the present day, with artifacts collected by the museum staff following the killing of Michael Brown and the resulting civil unrest in Ferguson playing a major role in the exhibit. #1 in Civil Rights opens on Saturday, March 11, and continues through April 15, 2018. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
#1 in Civil Rights

St. Louis Renaissance Festival

Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Continues through Oct. 15

Renaissance fests come in for a great deal of mockery from the general public, and most of it is unwarranted. If you have something against jousting demonstrations, turkey legs and people dressed up as kings and queens (and that dude in Jack Sparrow cosplay who shows up everywhere) having a good time outdoors, that’s on you. Sure, much of the entertainment is historically inaccurate, but that mishmash of time, culture and historical figures doesn’t stop you from enjoying Game of Thrones. Speaking of, there’s a replica Throne of Swords at this year’s St. Louis Renaissance Festival, and it’s free to sit on for photo opps. Other attractions this year include jugglers, a mermaid cove, improv troupe the Scally Wags and the tart-tongued women in the Washing Well Wenches. Plus, apple cider floats. Apple cider floats — c’mon. This year’s St. Louis Renaissance Festival takes place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday through October 15 at Rotary Park (2577 West Meyer Road, Wentzville; www.stlrenfest.com). Tickets are $9.50 to $18.95, and you save money by buying your tickets in advance instead of at the gate. $9.50-$18.50

Rotary Park (map)
2577 W. Meyer Road
Wentzville St. Louis Renaissance Festival

Apex Motorsport Driving Experience

Sun., Sept. 24, 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
info@apexmotorsport.com

Now is your chance to get behind the wheel of a supercar on a racetrack! APEX Motorsport is a locally owned high performance driving experience that allows individuals to drive a supercar on a closed circuit racetrack with no speed limits for 4 laps. Vehicles you can drive - BMW M3 (*$125) - Nissan GTR (*$165) - Porsche 911 GT3 (*$199) - Ferrari 458 Italia (*$225) Plus $39 for minimum insurance Must be 21 or older with a valid drivers license to drive. *Use code GM504XX at checkout $125 - $225

https://apexmotorsport.com/
Buy Tickets

Pedal the Cause

Sun., Sept. 24, 6 a.m.-3 p.m.
phone 314-787-1990
info@pedalthecause.org
, ,

Pedal the Cause is the premier cycling event in the region, with the mission of curing all cancers, for everyone. Pedal the Cause is the only fundraiser that gives 100 percent of participant donations to Siteman Cancer Center and Siteman Kids at St. Louis Children’s Hospital to accelerate lifesaving, world-class cancer research being performed right here in St. Louis. With six different courses, a stationary cycling option, a kids challenge and volunteer opportunities, there is truly something for everyone. Online registration and more info is available at www.pedalthecause.org. Varies

https://www.pedalthecause.org
Buy Tickets
Chesterfield Amphitheater (map)
631 Veterans Place Drive
Chesterfield Pedal the Cause

Volunteers Needed to Care for Wildlife

Mondays-Sundays. Continues through Oct. 1
phone 636-677-3670
info@wild-life-rehab.com
,

Volunteers needed to help care for wildlife. No experience necessary! You must be 18 or older and up-to-date on your tetanus. Volunteers must be able to give their time one day a week for one 5 hour shift. Volunteer shifts are 8am-1pm and 6pm-11pm seven days a week. You will be feeding wildlife and cleaning cages while the injured or orphaned wildlife is in our care prior to it being released back into the wild. These are not pets, these are wild animals that need our help. To fill out a volunteer application go to our website at www.wild-life-rehab.com. Free

http://www.wild-life-rehab.com
Wildlife Rehabilitation Clinic (map)
1864 Little Brennan Rd
Fenton
phone 636-677-3670
Volunteers Needed to Care for Wildlife

Jefferson Barracks Telephone Museum

Wednesdays-Sundays, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Continues through Dec. 31
phone 314-416-8004
jeffersonbarrackstelephonemuseum@yahoo.com
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Housed in a beautifully restored 1896 building, the museum features an extensive collection of telephones manufactured from the early 1900s through the 2000s, hundreds of pieces of telephone-related equipment and memorabilia and military telephones from WWII through the Vietnam War. It is located in the historic Jefferson Barracks Park, a 15 minute drive south of downtown St. Louis. The self-guided, accessible museum has many hands-on, how-things-work displays. The displays were created to inspire an interest in engineering and history. Guided tours are available for groups of 10 or more and should be scheduled at least two weeks before the tour. $3 - $5

http://www.jbtelmuseum.org
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