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Rachel Whiteread

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 9

Rachel Whiteread emerged on the London art scene in the "cool Britannia" era of the late '80s and early '90s. The country was doing well financially and culturally, and people were ready to buy contemporary art made by contemporary British artists. Whiteread established herself as a leading light with her casts of everyday objects, which solidified the negative space in, under and/or around them in materials such as wax, plaster, concrete and resin. House, Whiteread's massive, freestanding concrete cast of the interior of an entire three-story Victorian house, earned her the prestigious Turner Prize in 1993, making her the first woman to win. Rachel Whiteread, the new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum, is a retrospective of the artist's career that showcases 96 objects. They range from the small Untitled (Pink Torso), a voluptuous form of the inside of a hot water bottle cast in pink dental plaster, to the expansive Untitled (Twenty-Five Spaces), translucent resin casts of the underside of various chairs and stools arrayed on a game-board-like grid. The exhibit is on display Tuesday through Sunday (March 17 to June 9) at the Saint Louis Arts Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), and tickets are $6 to $12 (but free on Friday). $6-$12

Currents 116: Oliver Laric

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 27

Austrian-born artist Oliver Laric creates work that explores image creation and repetition, which he displays on both the museum and gallery circuit and the online realm. For his new exhibition, Currents 116: Oliver Laric, he presents his video animation Betweenness, which features repurposed mushrooms, people, anime characters and some snippets of the CT scan of the Saint Louis Art Museum's mummy, Amen-Nestawy-Nakht, all morphing into animals. The cycle of looped video blurs all of these borrowed images together, which reveals their shared shapes and forms. Laric also sculpted his own version of Reclining Pan (long on display in the museum's gallery 236) using 3D scans of the original. He used the digital files to "print" sections of the sculpture in various materials on a 3D printer, which he then assembled. Currents 116: Oliver Laric is on display in galleries 249 and 250 from February 22 to May 27 at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). The museum is open Tuesday through Sunday, and admission is free. free admission

Counterpublic

Fridays, Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Wednesdays, Thursdays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through July 13

St. Louis is a city of neighborhoods. Everyone in St. Louis has said that at some point; if there is a truth universally acknowledged in this town, it's that our many neighborhoods are our strength and civic identity. And yet, how many people in your neighborhood eat the same food, share the same values and dream the same dreams?

For James McAnally, who with his wife Brea is the cofounder of the Luminary, the neighborhood theory may be true, but it's not a unifying principal.

"William Gass wrote that 'the Midwest is a dissonance of parts and people,'" says McAnally, referencing the late St. Louis-based writer.

That idea is the inspiration for the Luminary's ambitious new project, Counterpublic. The three-month long artistic exploration of the many dissonances that inhabit a shared geographic area incorporates public art, installations, discussions and performances. The McAnallys and curator Katherine Simóne Reynolds chose their own home turf for this experiment: Cherokee Street, with all the many cultures and people who inhabit it.

"It's a complicated project and something that hasn't been done yet," McAnally says with just a hint of understatement. "This idea of the 'counterpublic,' it speaks to the idea [that] there are people who don't feel included in this community. A counterpublic is analogous to subculture. It comes out of queer culture and feminist writing. The framing that's most helpful for Counterpublic is that it's a public art festival, or a platform that is meant to activate the neighborhood."

McAnally is quick to note that Cherokee isn't simply one neighborhood. The street crosses through four different ones on official city maps — Tower Grove East, Benton Park West, Marine Villa and Gravois Park — as well as two different aldermanic wards.

"Cherokee is the Latinx community, it's majority African American, it's eclectic and diverse," explains McAnally. "What do all of these groups have to say to each other? How can we keep the neighborhood together? Counterpublic is meant to activate the neighborhood — all of it, every group."

To do so successfully, the McAnallys began by talking to representatives of each division and explaining the plan and seeking partnerships.

"It was important to us early on to involve the business community, the Latinx community, all of these groups," McAnally says. "We have twenty permanent exhibitions throughout the project, from both local and national artists who come from the cultures found in Cherokee. We invited several Indigenous artists — we call it 'Cherokee' casually, but what does that really mean?"

Counterpublic encompasses many parts, people and ideas, all coming together to facilitate a free exchange of ideas. The plan is for Counterpublic to be a triennial festival that moves to a new neighborhood with each new iteration, but it's not at all an attempt to pigeonhole or homogenize any community. The dissonance is vital, and in the case of the inaugural production, deeply personal for the McAnallys.

"Counterpublic is a chance to ask ourselves, 'How do these many different voices come together, and how do we maintain an equitable development?'" James asks, not all rhetorically. "'How do we account for difference, and dissent? And how do we continue to live alongside each other while disagreeing?'"

Counterpublic opens Saturday, April 13, with tours, talks and performances from 1 to 6 p.m. at the Luminary (2701 Cherokee Street; www.theluminaryarts.org). An opening-night party takes place from 8 to 11 p.m., with complimentary food from neighborhood restaurants, artist-designed galletas by Rodolfo Marron III and Diana's Bakery and live video and DJ performances. New installations, processions, performances and public programs will continue through July 13. The full schedule is available at www.counterpublic.us. free admission

The Luminary (map)
2701 Cherokee St
St. Louis - South City
phone 314-773-1533
Counterpublic

How We See: Materiality and Color

Through June 29, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Humans can perceive a wide palette of colors, but we don't see as many hues as nature contains. The limitations of human vision are stretched in the Laumeier Sculpture Park's new exhibition How We See: Materiality and Color. Six artists who combine modern art practices with a keen observation of the natural world explore the possibilities of color manipulation and perception. Claire Ashley's specially commissioned, large-scale inflatable Ruddy Udder Dance is painted in neon colors. Volunteers will get inside it and perform a series of choreographed routines that allow you to see how its various shades change with movement and daylight. Ann Lindberg's graphite-and-colored-pencil piece as though air could turn to honey features a closely packed array of thin lines of pure pigment that become subtly darker toward the bottom. From a distance those tints blend and fade, and the piece appears to have a more uniform golden hue. How We See opens with a free reception at 11 a.m. Saturday, March 2, at Laumeier's Aronson Fine Arts Center (12580 Rott Road, Sunset Hill; www.laumeier.org). The exhibit continues through June 29, and admission is free. free admission

Muny Memories: 100 Years on Stage

Through June 2

The Muny is just about to open its landmark 100th season, and its neighbor, the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBalivere Avenue; www.mohistory.org), celebrates the occasion with an exhibit dedicated to the history of America's largest outdoor theater. Muny Memories: 100 Years on Stage features exhibits that explain the founding of the theater, display favorite memories from stars and staff, and give a look back stage to see how the dedicated technical crew creates and rigs all those sets and lights. You can also take a look at programs from the Muny's long, storied past. Muny Memories opens on Saturday, June 9, and remains on display daily through June 2, 2019. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
Muny Memories: 100 Years on Stage

Fashioning the Black Body

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 4

For black Americans, dressing well was not merely a matter of fashion — it was necessary for survival. In the era of sundown towns and the Green Book, when black families took the highways of America they dressed to the nines to show white America that they were people of substance, respectable and decent and not going to start any trouble. As they did with many of the rules enforced upon them, these early Americans took what little was allowed to them and made it their own source of pride. Hats were cocked at rakish angles, colors were vibrant and cuts were cleaner and sharper than what white America wore. In time, black styles were appropriated by the mainstream. Again and again the cycle has repeated itself, moving from black subcultures to the malls and schoolyards of middle America. The art show Fashioning the Black Body explores the ways in which fashion defines and projects the black identity in a variety of media. Mickalene Thomas' silkscreen I've Been Good to Me shows a black woman adorned and surrounded by color and pattern in her home. Mario Moore's oil painting One Day in the Land of Milk and Honey depicts a black figure laying flat on the ground, beneath it a subway platform upon which mills a group of faceless people in identical hoodies. Fashioning the Black Body opens with a free reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, March 15, at Projects+Gallery (4733 McPherson Avenue; www.projects-gallery.com). The show continues through May 4. free admission

Projects + Gallery (map)
4733 McPherson Ave
St. Louis - Central West End
phone 314-696-8678
Fashioning the Black Body

Miss Saigon

Sundays, 1 & 6:30 p.m., Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Tuesdays-Fridays, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., May 5, 1 p.m. Continues through May 4

In the midst of the Vietnam War, G.I. Chris meets Kim, a war orphan. Kim works in a bar run by the opportunistic man known as the Engineer, and she's essentially his property. Chris' tour is almost over, and even if it wasn't he'll be leaving in a matter of days when Saigon falls to the communists. Here at the end of the world, Kim and Chris find love — at least for one night. But their union has unintended consequences when the communists take over, and Kim is left behind to deal with them. The revival of Claude-Michel Schönberg and Alain Boublil's bombastic musical Miss Saigon returns to the Fox Theatre (527 North Grand Boulevard; www.fabulousfox.com) for a two-week run. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 and 6:30 p.m. Sunday (April 23 to May 4). There's a final matinee at 1 p.m. Sunday, May 5, and tickets are $30 to $99. $30-$99

Buy Tickets
The Fox Theatre (map)
527 N. Grand Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-534-1111
Miss Saigon

Cirque du Soleil: Corteo

Thu., April 25, 7:30 p.m., Fri., April 26, 7:30 p.m., Sat., April 27, 3:30 & 7:30 p.m. and Sun., April 28, 1 & 5 p.m.
phone 314-977-5000

Corteo, the latest and most enchanting Cirque du Soleil’s arena production is now touring in North America. Corteo, which means cortege in Italian, is a joyous procession, a festive parade imagined by a clown. The show brings together the passion of the actor with the grace and power of the acrobat to plunge the audience into a theatrical world of fun, comedy and spontaneity situated in a mysterious space between heaven and earth. $55+

https://www.cirquedusoleil.com/corteo
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Chaifetz Arena (map)
1 S. Compton Ave.
St. Louis - Midtown
phone 314-977-5000

Jefferson Barracks Telephone Museum Military Telephone Exhibit

Wednesdays-Sundays, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Continues through June 30
phone 314-416-8004
jbtelmuseum@yahoo.com

@ Jefferson Barracks Telephone Museum, 12 Hancock Ave, St Louis MO 63125
To commemorate the upcoming 75th anniversary of D-Day, the Jefferson Barracks Telephone Museum has created an exhibit featuring telephones used by military personnel. Housed in a restored 1896 building, the museum also features an extensive collection of telephones from the early 1900s through the 2000s, hundreds of pieces of telephone-related equipment, memorabilia from 1880s through the 2000s, a wide variety of novelty telephones and much more. It is located in the Jefferson Barracks Park, a 15-minute drive south of downtown. The Jefferson Barracks Telephone Museum has many hands-on, how-things-work exhibits created to inspire an interest in engineering and history. Adults $5; Seniors $4; Children Ages 5-12 $3

http://www.jbtelmuseum.org

Ceramic Centric and Accompanying Exhibitions

Tuesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through May 24
phone 636-255-0270
exhibitions@foundryartcentre.org
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The Foundry Art Centre is excited to present “Ceramic Centric”, a juried exhibition of thirty-three ceramic artists from twelve states, to the community this April 12, 2019. Local Artist and owner of The Reese Gallery, Ruth Reese, curated this exhibition that explores modern interpretations of the ceramic medium. Sculptural and utilitarian pieces alike will both amuse and awe viewers. Going Solo Award Winner from 2017 exhibition “Context II”, Elizabeth Conn, will be exhibiting her papier-mache sculptures in Gallery III. In the Ameristar Gallery, the Foundry Art Centre Studio Artists will have an exhibition of their artwork. Free

http://www.foundryartcentre.org/ceramic-centric
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Foundry Art Centre (map)
520 N. Main Center
St. Charles
phone 636-255-0270

Fabric of Spring I

Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through April 26
phone 314-402-1959
GreenDoorartgallery@aol.com

Green Door art gallery is proud to present “Fabric of Spring”. The Opening Reception will be Friday, March 22, from 5-8 pm and is free and open to the public. Featuring Gena Loseto with sensitive drawing and yupo watercolors, Alicia Farris’ watercolors, the sewn fabric paintings of Mary Beth Gray, Sandra Illian’s textural weavings and Michael Plurd’s modern calendar pin-ups. These painting will be available from March 6, 2019 thru April 26, 2019. Free

http://GreenDoorartgallery.com/events
Green Door Art Gallery (map)
21 N. Gore Ave.
Webster Groves
phone 314-402-1959

The Wonderful World of Collecting Disneyana

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through Aug. 18
phone 314-421-4689
info@fieldhousemuseum.org
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The Field House Museum invites you to be our guest as we celebrate the 90th anniversary of Mickey Mouse with an array of Disney© collectibles on loan from Don & Shirley Zork. Since 1923, Walt Disney and his creations have entertained audiences across the large and small screens. From humble beginnings here in Missouri to stardom, the company has developed into a household name capturing hearts worldwide. Learn about the man behind the magic and all things Disney© while reminiscing over a collection that has taken more than 30 years to compile. $5-$10

https://fieldhousemuseum.org/exhibits/
Field House Museum (map)
634 S. Broadway
St. Louis - Downtown
phone 314-421-4689

Counterpublic

Wednesdays, Thursdays, 12-5 p.m. and Fridays, Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through July 13
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The Luminary presents Counterpublic, a major new public art platform set to animate the everyday spaces of Cherokee Street with expansive artist commissions, performances, processions, and public programs from April 13th to July 13th, 2019. Counterpublic 2019 will bring groundbreaking contemporary art to the barbershops, bakeries, parks, and taquerias that anchor the Cherokee Street neighborhoods of South St. Louis. The project centers on a series of twenty-plus site-responsive commissions in venues as divergent as a tea shop, punk club, former sanctuary, Buddhist temple, Mexican panaderia, and community-organized park. Free and open to the public. Free

http://counterpublic.us
The Luminary (map)
2701 Cherokee St
St. Louis - South City
phone 314-773-1533

Foundations of Freedom

Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through Jan. 31, 2020
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Dred Scott was a slave who'd been taken from Missouri, a slave state, to Illinois, a free one. Yet he remained in bondage. In 1846 Scott sued for freedom from enslavement for himself and his wife Harriet, arguing that his two years of residing in a free state should make him a citizen under the doctrine of "once free, always free." The case was fought in various courts from 1846 to 1857, with victories and setbacks along the way. After the Scotts' patron could no longer pay their legal fees, St. Louis attorney Roswell Field took the case pro bono and continued the fight to win the Scotts' freedom. It was an unpopular cause in Missouri, but the Scotts' eventual defeat helped further stiffen the spine of the abolitionist cause. Roswell Field's home is now the Field House Museum, which opens its new exhibition, Foundations of Freedom, in honor of Black History Month. The exhibit tells the story of the Scotts' long legal struggle, other freedom suits and the national conversation about the legality of slavery in the nineteenth century. Foundations of Freedom opens Saturday, February 2, at the Field House Museum (634 South Broadway; www.eugenefieldhouse.org). It remains on display through January 31, 2020, and the museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. Admission is $5 to $10. $5-$10

Field House Museum (map)
634 S. Broadway
St. Louis - Downtown
phone 314-421-4689
Foundations of Freedom

St. Louis School of Burlesque and Variety Spring Session

Mondays, 6-7, 7-8:30 & 7:30-8:30 p.m., Tuesdays, 6:30-7:30 & 8:30-9:30 p.m., Wednesdays, 8-9 p.m., Thursdays, 8:30-9:30 p.m., Sundays, 2-3 p.m. and Thursdays, 2-3 p.m. Continues through May 23
phone 314-578-2858
stlburlesque@gmail.com

St. Louis School of Burlesque and Variety is happy to present to you our Spring session as the next phase of Van Ella Studios. This school prides itself on being a place for humans to feel empowered and free. We provide a creative environment open to all genders, national origins, sexual orientations, body types, and good humans. We encourage and support our community to live their best lives and strive to do so along with them. $60-$180

http://www.stlburlesque.com
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