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The Color of August

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through Aug. 19

Maria and Laura have known each other for most of their lives, but they have been apart for the last few years. In the interim Maria's art career has taken off, and she's married well. Laura is struggling to get by, professionally and emotionally. But it wasn't that long ago that the two were bound together, emotionally, physically and creatively. What happened in the past that makes this current meeting more of a cautious interrogation and stand-off than a happy reunion? Paloma Pedrero's The Color of August is a psychological investigation of two women who once shared a life — but now can barely share the same room. Slightly Askew Theatre Ensemble presents The Color of August at 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday (August 9 to 19) at the Chapel (6238 Alexander Drive; www.slightlyoff.org). Tickets are $15 to $20. $15-$20

The Chapel (map)
6238 Alexander Drive
Clayton The Color of August

Out on Broadway: The Third Coming

Thursdays-Saturdays. Continues through Aug. 19
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New Line Theatre's sporadically produced musical revue Out on Broadway returns for only the third time in 21 years with Out on Broadway: The Third Coming. It's an exceptionally simple set-up: You take five male singers, give them a pianist as accompaniment, and let them loose to tell their stories — the loves, losses and lives of five gay men — through the songs of musicals such as Kinky Boots, Heathers, Hamilton and The Book of Mormon. This lucky third production comes with the added bonus of "Hope," a brand-new song from Jason Robert Brown (composer of The Last Five Years and Parade, among many others), which will open the show. Come for some old favorites and get a couple new surprises as well. Out on Broadway: The Third Coming is performed at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday (August 3 to 19) at the Marcelle Theatre (3310 Samuel Shepard Drive; www.newlinetheatre.com). Tickets are $15 to $25. $15-$25

Imagery of Chess: St. Louis Artists

Wednesdays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Mondays, Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 17

In 1944 Marcel Duchamp, Julien Levy and Max Ernst organized The Imagery of Chess, an exhibition of chess sets reimagined by artists and performers. Their hope was that people's vision of the chess board and pieces would be expanded beyond the then-accepted options of either the classic Staunton design or the "French" set. In 2016, the World Chess Hall of Fame exhibited some of the works from the 1944 show to acknowledge the debt owed to those artists for forever altering the look of chess. Imagery of Chess: St. Louis Artists is the new follow-up exhibit, which invites twenty local artists to have their way with the game pieces. Among those participating are Eugenia Alexander, who cites the Afrofuturism movement as a key influence on her work; fashion designer and Project Runway vet Michael Drummond; and Yuka Suga, a glass and metals artist who also works as a therapist. A second, simultaneous show, Pow! Capturing Superheroes, Chess & Comics, showcases more than 200 chess-themed comic books (you'd be surprised by how many super villains play chess to keep their minds sharp for optimal intricate scheming functionality). There are also superhero-themed chess boards and a comic book reading room. Both exhibitions open a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, March 23, at the World Chess Hall of Fame (4652 Maryland Avenue; www.worldchesshof.org). Imagery of Chess continues through September 14. Pow! remains up through September 17. Admission is a suggested $5 donation. $5 suggested donation

Ragtime

Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. and Sat., Aug. 19, 2 p.m. Continues through Aug. 19

E.L. Doctorow's novel Ragtime is about three of the many Americas that existed at the start of the twentieth century. There are the immigrants, as personified by the Jewish man Tateh and his daughter; the black Americans, here 300 years and still on the outside of everything, represented by the musician Coalhouse and his girl, Sarah; and there are the established, comfortable families, in this case temporarily headed by Mother while her husband participates in a scientific expedition. What do these three strands of society have in common? Not much, but over time they can — and will — weave together and form a new image of America. The musical version of Ragtime, adapted by Terrence McNally, Stephen Flaherty and Lynn Ahrens, sets the story in the framework of the American art form, revealing the faith and courage required to pursue a new life. Stray Dog Theatre closes its current season with Ragtime. Performances are at 8 p.m. Thursday to Saturday (August 3 to 19) at the Tower Grove Abbey (2336 Tennessee Avenue; www.straydogtheatre.org). There are additional shows at 8 p.m. Wednesday, August 16, and at 2 p.m. Saturday, August 19. Tickets are $20 to $25. $20-$25

Tower Grove Abbey (map)
2336 Tennessee Ave.
St. Louis - South Grand
phone 314-865-1995
Ragtime

A Century of Japanese Prints

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 28, 2018

Japan had a long history of woodblock printing (ukiyo-e) that, although now recognized for their artistic qualities, were at the time purely commercial works. That began to change in the mid-nineteenth century, as Japanese artists were exposed to Western printmaking. These early modern artists began the creative print movement, which was motivated by a desire to explore the artistic possibilities of Japan's traditional hand-carved woodblock printing methods. Artists such as Kobayakawa Kiyoshi and Hashiguchi Goyō created portraits of modern Japanese society in prints that are both beautiful works of art and incredible documents of an era. The Saint Louis Art Museum displays a treasure trove of them in the new exhibit, A Century of Japanese Prints. The show opens on Friday, August 11, and remains up through January 28. Admission is free. free admission

New Media Series: Amy Granat

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Nov. 12

In the nineteenth century the American Dream was tied up in Manifest Destiny. We would spread across the continent from the East to the West on foot, by wagon or train. Once the West was won, the dream changed and became nice home, a fast car and an open road. But what is the American Dream today, when we cover the land from to sea to sea and all frontiers are gone? Amy Granat's Cars, Trees, Houses, Beaches is a silent 16mm film loop of Hawaiian beaches, muscle cars and modernist homes, among them Kirkwood's own Russell and Ruth Goetz Krauss house, which was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The film ruminates on these conquered frontiers, many of which are once again the stuff of dreams for Americans. The Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org) presents Granat's film as part of its long-running New Media Series. It shows on an endless loop from July 14 to November 12 in gallery 301. Admission is free, and the museum is open every day except Monday. free admission

Jennifer Colten: Higher Ground

Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 26

Back in the old days, the insanities of racism and segregation kept black people and white people out of the same graveyards. Washington Park Cemetery was for many years the largest final resting place for black St. Louis. Its proximity to Lambert St. Louis International Airport doomed it, however. Highway 70 ran through the middle of the cemetery in the 1950s, and more bodies were moved in the '90s when MetroLink tracks were laid and the airport expanded. Photographer Jennifer Colten documented the current state of the cemetery for the new multimedia exhibition Higher Ground: Honoring Washington Park Cemetery, Its People and Place. Her large-scale, color photographs are supported by historical documentation, video and oral histories (by Denise Ward-Brown) and an art installation by Dail Chambers, all toward the goal of illuminating the racial politics and tangled history behind a black cemetery’s sacrifice in the name of progress. free admission

Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900
Jennifer Colten:  Higher Ground

Emily Oliver: Weaving as Ritual and Art

Sundays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3

Emily Oliver's work in Weaving as Ritual and Art is deceptively sparse. Her widely spaced color bars and shapes only look that way because you're thinking like a painter; all the white space in her weaving requires as much work as the colored bits, after all. Oliver's new exhibition Weaving as Ritual and Art alludes to early Modernist painters through her use of negative space and isolated color, but her work also hews to the pattern-making that comprises traditional textile arts. The exhibition opens with a free reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, July 7, at the Dark Room (3610 Grandel Square; www.thedarkroomstl.com). The show remains up through September 3. free admission

The Dark Room (map)
3610 Grandel Square
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-776-9550
Emily Oliver: Weaving as Ritual and Art

9 to 5 The Musical

Tuesdays-Fridays, 8 p.m., Saturdays, 4 & 8 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 20, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Continues through Aug. 20

Violet is the sort of hard-working employee most bosses would love to have. Unfortunately she works directly under Franklin Hart, a chauvinist who is never going to appreciate her skills or promote her. Newly divorced Judy has rejoined the workforce after a lengthy gap. She learns that the technology has outpaced her, even with excellent mentoring from colleague Violet. And then there's Doralee, Hart's busty personal secretary and, according to him, devoted love slave. These three working gals quickly realize that many of their problems would be solved if the boss was out of the way — and so they hatch a scheme to get him out of the picture. The 1980 film 9 to 5 was a surprise hit thanks to its fizzy feminist approach and wish fulfillment plot. Original star Dolly Parton adapted it into a musical with screenwriter Patricia Resnick (she co-wrote the film); Parton handles the music and lyrics, and Resnick the book. Stages St. Louis continues its season with 9 to 5 The Musical. Performances take place Tuesday through Sunday (July 21 to August 20) at the Robert G. Reim Theatre (111 South Geyer Road, Kirkwood; www.stagesstlouis.org). Tickets are $47 to $63. $47-$63

Robert G. Reim Theatre (map)
111 S. Geyer Road
Kirkwood
phone 314-821-2407
9 to 5 The Musical

#1 in Civil Rights

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through April 15, 2018

St. Louis' history as a wellspring of civil rights activism is deep and impressive. Dred and Harriet Scott's legal fight to be free, Mary Meachum's bold actions leading slaves to freedom across the Mississippi River, the Jefferson Bank protesters organizing to get access to better jobs, Percy Green and the daring VP Ball invaders who challenged St. Louis' powerful elite and the exclusionary nature of their private party — all of these people fought the good fight in St. Louis. #1 in Civil Rights, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; www.mohistory.org) chronicles the history of the civil rights movement in the metro area through artifacts, historical photos, oral histories, art work and actors' performances. Every key moment in the black struggle for equality is covered up to the present day, with artifacts collected by the museum staff following the killing of Michael Brown and the resulting civil unrest in Ferguson playing a major role in the exhibit. #1 in Civil Rights opens on Saturday, March 11, and continues through April 15, 2018. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
#1 in Civil Rights

Reigning Men: Fashion in Menswear 1715-2015

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through Sept. 17
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It was the poet-philosopher Billy Gibbons who first posited that "every girl is crazy 'bout a sharp-dressed man," and yet on the whole, American men have settled for athletic team logos and cargo shorts. But there's more to life than five-pocket shorts and t-shirts. Reigning Men: Fashion in Menswear 1715-2015, the new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), celebrates the beauty and style that's available to men. The show traces development of the suit from its origins as a military uniform through the heavily embroidered great coats of the nineteenth century, with a detour into the effectiveness of the black leather jacket before finishing up with modern sartorial splendors. Reigning Men is open Tuesday through Saturday (June 25 to September 17), and admission is $6 to $15, but the show is free on Friday. $6-$15, free on Friday

Finesse Mitchell

Thu., Aug. 17, 7:30 & 10 p.m., Fri., Aug. 18, 10 p.m. and Sat., Aug. 19, 10 p.m.

$18-$31

Helium Comedy Club (map)
1151 St. Louis Galleria
Richmond Heights
phone 314-727-1260

Finesse Mitchell

Thu., Aug. 17, 8-10 p.m., Fri., Aug. 18, 7:30-9:30 & 10 p.m.-12 a.m. and Sat., Aug. 19, 7:30-9:30 & 10 p.m.-12 a.m.
phone 314-727-1260
managementstl@heliumcomedy.com

Versatile comedian, actor, and author Finesse Mitchell knows a thing or two about making an audience howl with laughter. This comedy vet has a "Comedy Central Presents" special, was the breakout star of Shaq's All-Star Comedy Jam Tour, and starred in the 2007 big screen picture "Who's Your Caddy." This show is 18+. Tickets will be available for pick up at the box office prior to the show (they are generally available 1.5-2 hrs prior to showtime). $18.00 - $31.00

http://st-louis.heliumcomedy.com/events/17564
Buy Tickets
Helium Comedy Club (map)
1151 St. Louis Galleria
Richmond Heights
phone 314-727-1260
Finesse Mitchell

Volunteers Needed to Care for Wildlife

Mondays-Sundays. Continues through Oct. 1
phone 636-677-3670
info@wild-life-rehab.com
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Volunteers needed to help care for wildlife. No experience necessary! You must be 18 or older and up-to-date on your tetanus. Volunteers must be able to give their time one day a week for one 5 hour shift. Volunteer shifts are 8am-1pm and 6pm-11pm seven days a week. You will be feeding wildlife and cleaning cages while the injured or orphaned wildlife is in our care prior to it being released back into the wild. These are not pets, these are wild animals that need our help. To fill out a volunteer application go to our website at www.wild-life-rehab.com. Free

http://www.wild-life-rehab.com
Wildlife Rehabilitation Clinic (map)
1864 Little Brennan Rd
Fenton
phone 636-677-3670
Volunteers Needed to Care for Wildlife

Jefferson Barracks Telephone Museum

Wednesdays-Sundays, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Continues through Dec. 31
phone 314-416-8004
jeffersonbarrackstelephonemuseum@yahoo.com
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Housed in a beautifully restored 1896 building, the museum features an extensive collection of telephones manufactured from the early 1900s through the 2000s, hundreds of pieces of telephone-related equipment and memorabilia and military telephones from WWII through the Vietnam War. It is located in the historic Jefferson Barracks Park, a 15 minute drive south of downtown St. Louis. The self-guided, accessible museum has many hands-on, how-things-work displays. The displays were created to inspire an interest in engineering and history. Guided tours are available for groups of 10 or more and should be scheduled at least two weeks before the tour. $3 - $5

http://www.jbtelmuseum.org
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