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A Century of Japanese Prints

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 28, 2018

Japan had a long history of woodblock printing (ukiyo-e) that, although now recognized for their artistic qualities, were at the time purely commercial works. That began to change in the mid-nineteenth century, as Japanese artists were exposed to Western printmaking. These early modern artists began the creative print movement, which was motivated by a desire to explore the artistic possibilities of Japan's traditional hand-carved woodblock printing methods. Artists such as Kobayakawa Kiyoshi and Hashiguchi Goyō created portraits of modern Japanese society in prints that are both beautiful works of art and incredible documents of an era. The Saint Louis Art Museum displays a treasure trove of them in the new exhibit, A Century of Japanese Prints. The show opens on Friday, August 11, and remains up through January 28. Admission is free. free admission

Currents 114: Matt Saunders

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Feb. 4, 2018

American artist Matt Saunders is interested in the way an image can be altered with the passage of time. He pursues that interest through photography and animation, with a particular emphasis on avoiding cameras. Instead he captures light that has passed through oil paintings on linen, or through printed-on plastic, to create the shadows of images; his photograms are almost dark reflections of the intervening material. Saunders has created all-new work for Currents 114: Matt Saunders, his new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Among these new works are large-scale copper-plate etchings and a video installation that plays across multiple screens in two galleries. The mutable images of Matt Saunders are on display Tuesday through Sunday (November 17 to February 4) in gallery 249 and 250. Admission is free. free admission

Living Proof: The Art of Japanese Draftsmanship in the 19th Century

Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through March 3, 2018

As strange as it seems to us in the West, Japanese artists in the nineteenth century did not view their own drawings as individual works of art. They were "thinking on paper" or creating visual aids for wood carvers and printers who would create the actual work of art: the woodblock print. But despite their creators' misgivings about the artistry, drawings by master woodblock printers such as Utagawa Kuniyoshi and Katsushika Hokusai are indeed works of art. Living Proof: The Art of Japanese Draftsmanship in the 19th Century, the new exhibition at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation (3716 Washington Boulevard; www.pulitzerarts.org), collects more than 80 such "throwaway" drawings that capture the artists' work in their own hands, with corrections and alterations that demonstrate how they thought about and edited their projects "in camera." Living Proof is on display November 3 through March 3. free admission

Pulitzer Arts Foundation (map)
3716 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-754-1850
Living Proof: The Art of Japanese Draftsmanship in the 19th Century

Steve McCurry: The Importance of Elsewhere

Tuesdays-Saturdays. Continues through Feb. 3, 2018

Photographer Steve McCurry created an iconic image with his portrait of a young Afghani girl and her haunting, bottomless eyes, which stared down his lens and seemingly into the innermost chamber of your heart. But that photograph isn't the extent of McCurry's work. For almost 40 years he has been traveling the world, photographing people in India, the temples of Angkor Wat, burning oil fields in Kuwait, and indeed, even an entire series on the striking eyes he spots in people's faces the world over. Steve McCurry: The Importance of Elsewhere, the new exhibition of his work at the Sheldon (3648 Washington Boulevard; www.thesheldon.org), features 37 photographs made by McCurry during his journey. The exhibit opens with a free reception from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, October 6. The show continues through February 3, 2018, and the gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday. Admission is free. free admission

Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900
Steve McCurry: The Importance of Elsewhere

U.S. Bank Wild Lights

Wednesdays-Sundays, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Through Dec. 23, 5-8:30 p.m. and Through Dec. 30, 5-8:30 p.m. Continues through Dec. 17

Last year readers of USA Today determined that the Saint Louis Zoo (1 Government Drive; www.stlzoo.org) had the third-best holiday light display in the country. Buoyed by that ranking, the zoo is determined this year to come out on top — so expect to be dazzled by U.S. Bank Wild Lights. This year's light installation is open from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday (November 24 to December 17) and then goes nightly from December 18 to 23 and December 26 to 30. There will be carolers and costumed characters, fireside storytellers and children's craft projects in the Woodland Workshop. Penguin & Puffin Coast, Sea Lion Sound and the Monsanto Insectarium are all open during the evening event, as is the gift shop. Admission is $7 to $10. $7-$10

Saint Louis Zoo (map)
1 Government Dr
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-781-0900
U.S. Bank Wild Lights

Global Moves: Americans in Chess Olympiads

Mondays, Tuesdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sundays, 12-5 p.m. and Wednesdays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through April 1, 2018

The Chess Olympiad is a biennial competition in which national teams compete for the title. America is the current holder, triumphing against 180 other nations to achieve the victory. It was our first win since 1976, and so the World Chess Hall of Fame takes this golden opportunity to honor the reigning champions. The exhibition Global Moves: Americans in Chess Olympiads is a celebration of America's current and past glories, with numerous historic chess artifacts being displayed — among them, a gold medal from the 2016 team. Grandmasters Fabiano Caruana, Hikaru Nakamura, Wesley So, Ray Robson and Sam Shankland, who all played for the 2016 American team, will attend the opening reception, which takes place from 6 to 8 p.m. tonight at the World Chess Hall of Fame (4652 Maryland Avenue; www.worldchesshof.org). Also on display is the Hamilton-Russell Cup, the trophy granted to the Olympiad's winning team. Global Moves continues through April 1. $3-$5 suggested donation

Theo Welling: Portraits

Sundays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11-1 a.m. Continues through Dec. 31

For the past couple years, Theo Welling has had a weekly gig photographing and interviewing St. Louisans for the Riverfront Times (there's that full disclosure). Every week the paper publishes the photo, and accompanying commentary from his subjects, as "The Lede." Welling has spoken with short-order cooks, kids, acrobats, artists, yoga practitioners — pretty much anybody who is willing to share something about their life. As documents, they're interesting, but as a barometer of what St. Louis worries about, believes, celebrates and condemns, they're fascinating. Welling's best shots are familiar and startling, reminding us that for all the ways we're different, we're also recognizably the same. Theo Welling: Portraits, an exhibition of his favorite images, opens with a free public reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, November 3, at the Dark Room (3610 Grandel Square; www.thedarkroomstl.com). The show remains up through December 31. free admission

The Dark Room (map)
3610 Grandel Square
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-776-9550
Theo Welling: Portraits

Kader Attia: Reason's Oxymorons

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 8, 2018

Human beings' adaptability is what allows people to gradually come to terms with catastrophic change and trauma. In the Western world, we consider it possible for someone who has experienced a tragedy to "heal," thereby erasing a wrong. But the non-Western world doesn't always believe that disaster can be plastered over. In some countries, the scars and imperfections are celebrated. These conflicting ideas of past damage are the inspiration for French-Algerian artist Kader Attia's exhibition Reason's Oxymorons. Attia interviewed and filmed historians, storytellers, philosophers and ethnographers from around the world discussing their cultural ideas of healing psychic damage. These films are then continuously played on an array of televisions placed throughout a maze of gray cubicles. The viewer can pass from cube to cube, gaining exposure to previously foreign worldviews. Kader Attia: Reason's Oxymorons opens with a free public reception from 7 to 9 p.m. tonight at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum on the Washington University campus (1 Brookings Drive; www.kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu). The show remains up through January 8, and the museum is open every day except Tuesday. free admission

Mickalene Thomas: Mentors, Muses and Celebrities

Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through Dec. 31

New York-based artist Mickalene Thomas pursues the perception of black women in the spotlight in her new exhibit, >Mentors, Muses and Celebrities. Known mostly for her rhinestone, acrylic and enamel paintings, here Thomas explores how gender and beauty are represented in modern society through film and video installations. Her twelve-minute, two-channel video projection Do I Look Like a Lady? features images of Eartha Kitt, Moms Mabley and Whitney Houston, all of them black women who attained a level of power and fame. Thomas draws equal inspiration from the three women at the heart of the film adaptation of The Color Purple, as played by Oprah Winfrey, Whoopi Goldberg and Margaret Avery. The juxtaposition of three characters who had little to no power in their lives being portrayed by three exceptionally powerful women is the essence of Thomas' work. Who decides which women are beautiful? What is the source of their power? Who controls the image? Mickalene Thomas: Mentors, Muses and Celebrities opens with a free public reception at 7 p.m. tonight at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org). The show remains up through December 31, and the museum is open Wednesday through Sunday. free admission

#1 in Civil Rights

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through April 15, 2018

St. Louis' history as a wellspring of civil rights activism is deep and impressive. Dred and Harriet Scott's legal fight to be free, Mary Meachum's bold actions leading slaves to freedom across the Mississippi River, the Jefferson Bank protesters organizing to get access to better jobs, Percy Green and the daring VP Ball invaders who challenged St. Louis' powerful elite and the exclusionary nature of their private party — all of these people fought the good fight in St. Louis. #1 in Civil Rights, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; www.mohistory.org) chronicles the history of the civil rights movement in the metro area through artifacts, historical photos, oral histories, art work and actors' performances. Every key moment in the black struggle for equality is covered up to the present day, with artifacts collected by the museum staff following the killing of Michael Brown and the resulting civil unrest in Ferguson playing a major role in the exhibit. #1 in Civil Rights opens on Saturday, March 11, and continues through April 15, 2018. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
#1 in Civil Rights

Yvonne Osei: Tailored Landscapes

Mondays-Wednesdays, Fridays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Thursdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through March 4, 2018

Yvonne Osei takes over the Adam Aronson Fine Arts Center for her exhibition Tailored Landscapes — literally. Her large-scale photo installation occupies the length and breadth of the gallery, the two-year-old indoor gallery located at Laumeier Sculpture Park. The German-born artist has been photographing Laumeier throughout the past year; these images are then manipulated to create patterns reminiscent of the brightly patterned textiles of her Ghanian culture. Osei's manufactured figures comprise people observing the park’s sculptures, roads and the backdrop of greenery that surrounds Laumeier, but these elements only become apparent at close range. free admission

Thomas Struth: Nature & Politics

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 21, 2018

We live in a high-tech world in which we can communicate instantly with someone on the other side of the globe — or even orbiting in space on the International Space Station — without really understanding how such technological marvels occur. We may as well be victims of Arthur C. Clarke's Third Law: "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." German artist Thomas Struth reveals how scientists and engineers perform their magic tricks simply by showing you where the magic happens. His monumental photographs reveal the research spaces and installations where science reshapes our world every day. Thirty-five of Struth's visually dense photographs make up the new exhibition Thomas Struth: Nature & Politics at Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). The show features robotics laboratories and aeronautical centers that appear to be sets from a big-budget sci-fi movie, but they're really just office spaces for some of the most intelligent people on earth. Thomas Struth: Nature & Politics will be on display November 5 through January 21. Admission is $6 to $12. $6-$12, free on Friday

Residents of Craigslist

Dec. 13-16, 7:30 p.m.
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Putting on a show to raise some much-needed money is a time-honored tradition. Local theater company Equally Represented Arts takes this route for its first fundraising gala. The centerpiece of the evening is The Residents of Craigslist, an original show created from real posts found on Craigslist. Each performance opens with a silent auction at 7:30 p.m., followed by the play at 8 p.m. At 9:30 p.m., musical guests take the stage to perform. The entire extravaganza is reproduced across four nights, Wednesday through Saturday (December 13 to 16) at the Centene Center for the Arts (3547 Olive Street; www.eratheatre.org), with the musical act changing each night. Tickets for the evening are $25, and the dress code is "yard sale formal." $25

Jefferson Barracks Telephone Museum

Wednesdays-Sundays, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Continues through Dec. 31
phone 314-416-8004
jeffersonbarrackstelephonemuseum@yahoo.com
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Housed in a beautifully restored 1896 building, the museum features an extensive collection of telephones manufactured from the early 1900s through the 2000s, hundreds of pieces of telephone-related equipment and memorabilia and military telephones from WWII through the Vietnam War. It is located in the historic Jefferson Barracks Park, a 15 minute drive south of downtown St. Louis. The self-guided, accessible museum has many hands-on, how-things-work displays. The displays were created to inspire an interest in engineering and history. Guided tours are available for groups of 10 or more and should be scheduled at least two weeks before the tour. $3 - $5

http://www.jbtelmuseum.org

Illustrating the Words: The Artistry of the Picture Book

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through May 1, 2018
phone 314-421-4689
info@fieldhousemuseum.org

An exhibition showcasing original illustrations from classic and contemporary children’s books, Illustrating the Words: The Artistry of the Picture Book explores the drawings behind books that spark the imagination while subtly teaching morals and life lessons to readers. Let your creativity come alive as you wander through over 40 original pieces of artwork adorning the walls of the Field House Museum. $5-$10

https://fieldhousemuseum.org/
Field House Museum (map)
634 S. Broadway
St. Louis - Downtown
phone 314-421-4689
Illustrating the Words: The Artistry of the Picture Book
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