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#1 in Civil Rights

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through April 15, 2018

St. Louis' history as a wellspring of civil rights activism is deep and impressive. Dred and Harriet Scott's legal fight to be free, Mary Meachum's bold actions leading slaves to freedom across the Mississippi River, the Jefferson Bank protesters organizing to get access to better jobs, Percy Green and the daring VP Ball invaders who challenged St. Louis' powerful elite and the exclusionary nature of their private party — all of these people fought the good fight in St. Louis. #1 in Civil Rights, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; www.mohistory.org) chronicles the history of the civil rights movement in the metro area through artifacts, historical photos, oral histories, art work and actors' performances. Every key moment in the black struggle for equality is covered up to the present day, with artifacts collected by the museum staff following the killing of Michael Brown and the resulting civil unrest in Ferguson playing a major role in the exhibit. #1 in Civil Rights opens on Saturday, March 11, and continues through April 15, 2018. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
#1 in Civil Rights

A Century of Japanese Prints

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 28, 2018

Japan had a long history of woodblock printing (ukiyo-e) that, although now recognized for their artistic qualities, were at the time purely commercial works. That began to change in the mid-nineteenth century, as Japanese artists were exposed to Western printmaking. These early modern artists began the creative print movement, which was motivated by a desire to explore the artistic possibilities of Japan's traditional hand-carved woodblock printing methods. Artists such as Kobayakawa Kiyoshi and Hashiguchi Goyō created portraits of modern Japanese society in prints that are both beautiful works of art and incredible documents of an era. The Saint Louis Art Museum displays a treasure trove of them in the new exhibit, A Century of Japanese Prints. The show opens on Friday, August 11, and remains up through January 28. Admission is free. free admission

Currents 114: Matt Saunders

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Feb. 4, 2018

American artist Matt Saunders is interested in the way an image can be altered with the passage of time. He pursues that interest through photography and animation, with a particular emphasis on avoiding cameras. Instead he captures light that has passed through oil paintings on linen, or through printed-on plastic, to create the shadows of images; his photograms are almost dark reflections of the intervening material. Saunders has created all-new work for Currents 114: Matt Saunders, his new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). Among these new works are large-scale copper-plate etchings and a video installation that plays across multiple screens in two galleries. The mutable images of Matt Saunders are on display Tuesday through Sunday (November 17 to February 4) in gallery 249 and 250. Admission is free. free admission

Thomas Struth: Nature & Politics

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 21, 2018

We live in a high-tech world in which we can communicate instantly with someone on the other side of the globe — or even orbiting in space on the International Space Station — without really understanding how such technological marvels occur. We may as well be victims of Arthur C. Clarke's Third Law: "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." German artist Thomas Struth reveals how scientists and engineers perform their magic tricks simply by showing you where the magic happens. His monumental photographs reveal the research spaces and installations where science reshapes our world every day. Thirty-five of Struth's visually dense photographs make up the new exhibition Thomas Struth: Nature & Politics at Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org). The show features robotics laboratories and aeronautical centers that appear to be sets from a big-budget sci-fi movie, but they're really just office spaces for some of the most intelligent people on earth. Thomas Struth: Nature & Politics will be on display November 5 through January 21. Admission is $6 to $12. $6-$12, free on Friday

Mission: Mars

Mondays-Saturdays, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. and Sundays, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
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NASA is currently working toward the goal of putting humans on Mars in the 2030s, which is not as far away as it sounds. The space agency just last week opened the astronaut application process for the class of 2017, which indicates a certain urgency. If you're eager to see what the future holds, the Mission: Mars exhibition at the Saint Louis Science Center (5050 Oakland Avenue; 314-289-4400 or www.slsc.org) is the place to be. This interactive display is developed by the science center, Washington University and NASA and is divided into two parts. Mission Control gives you the chance to program and remotely drive a simulated Mars rover, complete with the time delay caused by the signal transit time between Earth and Mars. Mission Mars — Base lets you take on the role of an explorer on the Red Planet in the year 2076. You'll conduct scientific operations at key points using one of the science center's two rovers. Mission: Mars is open daily, and admission is free. free admission

Panoramas of the City

Through Aug. 12, 2018

In a year in which the Missouri History Museum exhibition team has given us the stories of St. Louis' greatest civil rights freedom fighters and returned us to the glory days of Route 66, it would take something truly spectacular for the museum to outdo itself — and yet somehow it's done just that. The museum's new exhibition, Panoramas of the City, is as close to time travel as you can get without involving Morlocks. The show comprises seven floor-to-ceiling-size images of scenes such as Charles Lindbergh speaking to a crowd of 100,000 people on Art Hill at his "welcome home" party and a 1920 march on Olive Street by the League of Women Voters. These massive photographs are joined by props and interactive media displays that give viewers a better understanding of the historical context of each scene. More than 60 panoramas of various sizes round out the exhibit, which will be on display from September 2 to August 12, 2018, at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; www.mohistory.org). Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
Panoramas of the City

U.S. Bank Wildlights

Starts Nov. 24. Fridays-Sundays, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Wednesdays, Thursdays, 5-8:30 p.m., Dec. 18-21, 5-8:30 p.m. and Dec. 26-30, 5-8:30 p.m. Continues through Dec. 14

U.S. Bank Wild Lights offers light displays, campfire s'mores, ice carving demonstrations on weekends and special nighttime viewings of Penguin & Puffin Coast, the Monsanto Insectarium and the Sea Lion Sound exhibition. $7-$10

Saint Louis Zoo (map)
1 Government Dr
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-781-0900

DJ Mahf:

Tuesdays, 10 p.m.

From the 2013 RFT Music awards: DJ Mahf works from some place in his brain that pumps out enough enthusiasm to make his work look easy. Performing with a chilled zeal, the Indyground DJ interplays dense minutes of thumping samples with crackling movie clips and fine-tuned, one-and-two-handed scratches. He has already banged around Kansas City's spirited Middle of the Map Festival with labelmate Brett Gretzky, crossed the northern American border and cut and pasted for Red Bull's Thre3style competition this year. Whether live or replayed through Indyground's streaming footage, Mahf exudes the enjoyment he feels: In tempo he bobs at the waist, moving faster in the moments when he is inundated with the floor's energy, always looking pleased. It is Mahf's obvious enjoyment of his craft that puts his sets so squarely in the spotlight. free

Pin-Up Bowl (map)
6191 Delmar Blvd.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-727-5555
DJ Mahf

New Media Series Screening: Local Urbanism

Fri., Dec. 1, 7-9:30 p.m.

Film and Panel Discussion New Media Series: Local Urbanism Friday, December 1, 7 pm The Farrell Auditorium, Free Get Tickets This program will feature screenings of video works by three local multi-media artists—Kat Reynolds, Jun Bae, and William Morris. The videos screened all explore in different ways the layered and complicated histories that can be found in the built environment. In particular, these artists are concerned with the urban landscape of Saint Louis, using it as a backdrop for further social, political, and art historical discussions. This screening examines the vibrant artistic scene of Saint Louis. Free; tickets required

http://www.slam.org/education/classes.php?expanddiv=class_4
Buy Tickets

St. Louis Hot Chocolate 15K & 5K Road Race

Sun., Dec. 10, 7:30-10 a.m.
phone 847-243-8500
stlouis@hotchocolate15k.com

The best goodie bags in running, free instantaneous race photos and scrumptious post-race treats are just three reasons you’ll want to sign up for RAM Racing’s 5th annual Hot Chocolate 15K/5K Race in St. Louis. The popular USATF-certified event hits the Gateway City starting near the Dwight Davis Tennis Center in Forest Park on December 10, 2017. Whether you’re a serious or recreational runner, you’ll score Hot Chocolate’s award-winning and always impressive race swag (this time it’s a quarter-zip long sleeve technical jacket). Then, after crossing the finish line a city specific medal and key chain await you. 5K: $49; 15K: $74

https://www.hotchocolate15k.com/stlouis
Buy Tickets

Walk For Wishes

Sat., April 14, 8 a.m.-3 p.m.
STLwalk@mo.wish.org
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The Walk For Wishes is a community-wide fundraising effort to help make wishes come true to children with a life threatening medical condition. A wish fulfilled gives hope, strength, and joy to the children and their families when they need it most. The wish experience provides something that medicine simply cannot - an improved outlook, better state of mind, and a newfound strength to fight their illness. Most importantly, it changes lives! free

http://walkforwishesstl.com
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