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Tom Huck: Electric Baloneyland

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through March 31

For decades, St. Louis artist Tom Huck has been delighting and revolting the masses in equal parts with his beautifully grotesque woodcut prints. From his Evil Prints outpost on Washington Avenue, Huck creates incredibly intricate, satirical images that call to mind the best of the Garbage Pail Kids as passed through an Albrecht Dürer filter. His latest show, Electric Baloneyland, catalogs the downward trajectory of American society through the lens of a county fair in Huck's patented confrontational style. The exhibition makes its St. Louis debut this week with an opening reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, February 16, at the Duane Reed Gallery (4729 McPherson Avenue; www.duanereedgallery.com). The show continues through March 31. free admission

Duane Reed Gallery (map)
4729 McPherson Ave.
St. Louis - Central West End
phone 314-361-4100
Tom Huck: Electric Baloneyland

Global Moves: Americans in Chess Olympiads

Mondays, Tuesdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sundays, 12-5 p.m. and Wednesdays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through April 1

The Chess Olympiad is a biennial competition in which national teams compete for the title. America is the current holder, triumphing against 180 other nations to achieve the victory. It was our first win since 1976, and so the World Chess Hall of Fame takes this golden opportunity to honor the reigning champions. The exhibition Global Moves: Americans in Chess Olympiads is a celebration of America's current and past glories, with numerous historic chess artifacts being displayed — among them, a gold medal from the 2016 team. Grandmasters Fabiano Caruana, Hikaru Nakamura, Wesley So, Ray Robson and Sam Shankland, who all played for the 2016 American team, will attend the opening reception, which takes place from 6 to 8 p.m. tonight at the World Chess Hall of Fame (4652 Maryland Avenue; www.worldchesshof.org). Also on display is the Hamilton-Russell Cup, the trophy granted to the Olympiad's winning team. Global Moves continues through April 1. $3-$5 suggested donation

The Dead Deads

Tue., Feb. 20, 7 p.m.

$12-$13

The Firebird (map)
2706 Olive St.
St. Louis - Midtown
phone 314-535-0353

Gabriel Fried

Tue., Feb. 20, 7 p.m.
phone 314-367-6731
info@left-bank.com
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Left Bank Books welcomes award-winning poet and University of Missouri professor Gabriel Fried, who will sign and read from his new collection, "The Children are Reading"! This event is free and open to the public, but proof of purchase of "The Children are Reading" from Left Bank Books will be required to enter the signing line. "The Children Are Reading" inhabits childhood spaces, physical and imaginative, on either side of the emergence of adult awareness, desires, and anxieties. Free

http://www.left-bank.com/event/gabriel-fried
Left Bank Books (map)
399 N Euclid Ave
St. Louis - Central West End
phone 314-367-6731
Gabriel Fried

Southern Outlaw Music Review

Tue., Feb. 20, 8 p.m.

w/ Lewis Brice, Jesse Kramer, Jake Shafer, Drew Dixon free

Tin Roof St. Louis (map)
1000 Clark Ave
St. Louis - Downtown
phone 314-240-5400

Southern Outlaw Music Review Presented by: Southern Comfort

Tue., Feb. 20, 8-11 p.m.
phone 314-540-5400
brooke@tinroofbars.com

St. Louis, Join us for a night of authentic Southern Outlaw Music presented by our good friends at Southern Comfort. This is your night to hear music with roots from legends such as Waylon Jennings, Johnny Cash, Merle Haggard, and David Allen Coe, to name a few. Come listen to up-and-coming Southern Outlaw artists Lewis Brice, Jesse Kramer, Jake Shafer, and Drew Dixon. This event is one night only! Invite a friend, enjoy a smooth Southern Comfort cocktail and get ready to listen to great music on Tuesday, February 20th. The Southern Outlaw Music Review. *Please drink responsibly

https://www.facebook.com/events/798000933729176/
Tin Roof St. Louis (map)
1000 Clark Ave
St. Louis - Downtown
phone 314-240-5400
Southern Outlaw Music Review Presented by: Southern Comfort
BB's Jazz, Blues & Soups (map)
700 S. Broadway
St. Louis - Downtown
phone 314-436-5222

Winter Selections - In the Abstract

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through March 31
phone 314-367-1076
info@atriumgallery.net

Atrium announces an upcoming exhibition "Winter Selections In the Abstract", opening Friday, February 16th. Featured will be a group show highlighting some of our favorite works with light and intense color for a seasonal winter warm up. Artists included are James Kuiper, Michael Marshall, Fredrick Nelson, Kirk Pedersen, Doug Salveson and Steven Sorman. Opening reception will be Friday, February 16, 6-8 PM and the exhibition runs through March 31. Please consult the gallery for images and information. Free

http://www.atriumgallery.net
Atrium Gallery (map)
4814 Washington Ave.
St. Louis - Central West End
phone 314-367-1076
Winter Selections - In the Abstract

Vivian Maier: Photography's Lost Voice

Starts Feb. 21. Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 26

Vivian Maier burst onto the art scene in 2007 with her treasure trove of urban photography. It was quite a feat for an 81-year-old, but even more so because most of her work was of mid-century New York and Chicago, and she had ceased making images a decade earlier. Also, she didn't ever show her work herself; filmmaker John Maloof bought a crate of negatives at auction and in it discovered her vast archive. He has spent years printing and scanning these negatives to bring her work to the public eye. Vivian Maier: Photography's Lost Voice, the new exhibition at the International Photography Hall of Fame and Museum (3415 Olive Street; www.iphf.org), offers St. Louis the rare opportunity to see Maier's work up close. The show includes her black-and-white urban images, her later color abstract work and examples of her landscape portraiture. Vivian Maier: Photography's Lost Voice is on display Wednesday through Saturday (February 21 to May 26). Admission is $5 to $10. $5-$10

Living Proof: The Art of Japanese Draftsmanship in the 19th Century

Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through March 3

As strange as it seems to us in the West, Japanese artists in the nineteenth century did not view their own drawings as individual works of art. They were "thinking on paper" or creating visual aids for wood carvers and printers who would create the actual work of art: the woodblock print. But despite their creators' misgivings about the artistry, drawings by master woodblock printers such as Utagawa Kuniyoshi and Katsushika Hokusai are indeed works of art. Living Proof: The Art of Japanese Draftsmanship in the 19th Century, the new exhibition at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation (3716 Washington Boulevard; www.pulitzerarts.org), collects more than 80 such "throwaway" drawings that capture the artists' work in their own hands, with corrections and alterations that demonstrate how they thought about and edited their projects "in camera." Living Proof is on display November 3 through March 3. free admission

Pulitzer Arts Foundation (map)
3716 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-754-1850
Living Proof: The Art of Japanese Draftsmanship in the 19th Century

Dario Calmese: amongst friends.

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through March 31
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Harlem preservationist Lana Turner is known for her collection of vintage fashions, among many other things. St. Louis-born artist Dario Calmese originally wanted to photograph her numerous hats, but quickly realized that Turner's personal style (she believes dressing is an artistic medium) should be captured in whole. Calmese photographed her in her Sunday best, tapping into the long black church tradition and Turner's own recreation of her identity through her savoir faire, which he fixed in black and white images. Calmese's photographs of Turner are partly theatrical, partly a statement of black identity, and they comprise his new exhibition, Dario Calmese: amongst friends. The show opens with a free public reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, February 16, at Projects+Gallery (4733 McPherson Avenue; www.projects-gallery.com). At 1 p.m. Saturday, February 17, Calmese and Tuner discuss their collaboration at the gallery. Dario Calmese: amongst friends. remains up through March 31, and the gallery is open Wednesday through Saturday. free admission

Projects + Gallery (map)
4733 McPherson Ave
St. Louis - Central West End
phone 314-696-8678
Dario Calmese: amongst friends.

Trenton Doyle Hancock: The Re-Evolving Door to the Moundverse

Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays, Thursdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through April 22

Drawing inspiration from the morality tales of cartoons (a cat is always bad, but birds or mice are good; dogs also are heroes), comic books (equally flamboyant bad guys and good guys), video games and films, Trenton Doyle Hancock created his own private universe, one in which the Mounds (half-plant, half-animal, all-good living forest) and the Vegans (they eat Mounds!) endlessly battle it out for supremacy. Both Coonbear and Bringback, a henchman in a striped unitard, are part of the battle, because they're also some part of Hancock. Politics, race, class, identity and issues of social justice are hidden in these stories, just like Sun Ra's own fully scored space operas in the jazz world. Trenton Doyle Hancock: The Re-Evolving Door to the Moundverse is a collection of these drawings, sculptures and prints that show part of the eternal struggle of good and evil, right and wrong, moral and immoral. The Re-Evolving Door to the Moundverse opens with a free reception at 7 p.m. Friday, January 19, at Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org). Hancock will discuss the Moundverse and his work at 11 a.m. Saturday, January 20. The show continues through April 22, and the gallery is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday, and 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Admission is free. free admission

#1 in Civil Rights

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through April 15

St. Louis' history as a wellspring of civil rights activism is deep and impressive. Dred and Harriet Scott's legal fight to be free, Mary Meachum's bold actions leading slaves to freedom across the Mississippi River, the Jefferson Bank protesters organizing to get access to better jobs, Percy Green and the daring VP Ball invaders who challenged St. Louis' powerful elite and the exclusionary nature of their private party — all of these people fought the good fight in St. Louis. #1 in Civil Rights, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; www.mohistory.org) chronicles the history of the civil rights movement in the metro area through artifacts, historical photos, oral histories, art work and actors' performances. Every key moment in the black struggle for equality is covered up to the present day, with artifacts collected by the museum staff following the killing of Michael Brown and the resulting civil unrest in Ferguson playing a major role in the exhibit. #1 in Civil Rights opens on Saturday, March 11, and continues through April 15, 2018. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
#1 in Civil Rights
BB's Jazz, Blues & Soups (map)
700 S. Broadway
St. Louis - Downtown
phone 314-436-5222

Crazy Town

Wed., Feb. 21, 7 p.m.

w/ Davey Suicide, Loaded Guns $17-$20

The Firebird (map)
2706 Olive St.
St. Louis - Midtown
phone 314-535-0353
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